General health issues

Discussion in 'I have a partner with dementia' started by Pierwalker, Aug 8, 2019.

  1. Pierwalker

    Pierwalker Registered User

    Apr 1, 2017
    18
    Now entering her sixth year with Alzheimers, thankfully my wife remains pretty cheerful and upbeat. The short term memories go very quickly but she spends many happy hours with her puzzle books almost to the point of obsession. My current concern is with her general fatigue, some unsteadiness, tiredness (but sleeps well), and occasional dizziness. Visited the doctor yesterday who confirmed nothing else serious going on but he did say the prescribed Memantine used to slow progress could cause this side effect. My question is whether this general condition can be associated with the progression of Alzheimers, and whether there are any remedies out there we may be able to try?
     
  2. Grahamstown

    Grahamstown Registered User

    Jan 12, 2018
    1,439
    East of England
    These are my husband’s symptoms to a T only much worse and there is nothing organic wrong with him. It is the disease as one by one the nerve communication is blocked and ability to function goes little by little. He won’t stand long at all because he feels dizzy and needs to lie down. He is not on any drugs, so my opinion is that it is the disease not the drug. I try to keep him moving a little bit but it is an uphill battle. So he gets weaker and weaker, isn’t wanting to eat, losing weight and sleeps or dozes on and off all day, but seems to sleep at night thank goodness. I keep him contented and don’t push him to do things, it’s the disease not him.
     
  3. Pierwalker

    Pierwalker Registered User

    Apr 1, 2017
    18
    Thank you. There doesn't seem to be much written up about the knock-on effects of the Alzheimers and the sort of progressions that can be expected although I appreciate everyone will respond individually.
     
  4. Grahamstown

    Grahamstown Registered User

    Jan 12, 2018
    1,439
    East of England
    #4 Grahamstown, Aug 8, 2019
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2019
    Just to add that I had a telephone conversation with the doctor yesterday to discuss all these symptoms and she said that it was to be expected and prescribed a supplement with added vitamins and minerals to try and help because he is losing weight so badly. I cannot force feed him and he is virtually starving himself unknowingly. Otherwise she said that I am doing the right things and there is nothing else to be done unless he weakens even more and needs more care than I can give him. I have a home nursing agency contact and they have seen him but so far I am managing and I have managed to arrange a respite break in a care home for September when I shall need it. It’s tough to organise and carry out but must be done. Good wishes to you and your wife (my husband is a lovely man too) !

    The other thing he does is breathe twice as fast as is normal most of the time, it’s very fast and may partly account for feeling dizzy when he stands up, as over breathing does do that. It’s quite worrying but it’s a feature of the disease.
     
  5. Pierwalker

    Pierwalker Registered User

    Apr 1, 2017
    18
    I'm back asking whether my wife's health issue is likely to be a symptom of the progression of her Alzheimers. She has developed much more dizziness and light headedness and clutches onto me when walking. The doctor today has found no other cause but is running a Urine check for infections. If it is a progression, and not linked, say, to the Memantine she is taking which has also been mentioned, then I need to know so I can be prepared.
     
  6. Grahamstown

    Grahamstown Registered User

    Jan 12, 2018
    1,439
    East of England
    These symptoms are the same as my husband who now rarely goes out of the house. This doesn’t mean that it’s the same for your wife but I think that it is a symptom of Alzheimer’s disease when everything else has been excluded. I have carers twice a week now to help with personal care and I have asked for a third day. He is having trouble swallowing and I blend his food which has made a bit of a difference although he doesn’t eat enough. We just have to respond to the symptoms and keep contented and that’s an achievement. My best wishes to you.
     
  7. BryanG2001

    BryanG2001 Registered User

    Mar 2, 2014
    46
  8. Grahamstown

    Grahamstown Registered User

    Jan 12, 2018
    1,439
    East of England
    That is interesting and will ask the doctor. His breathlessness seems to be related to stress because he breathes normally when he is relaxed doing what he wants and the rate increases exponentially as he gets more anxious. The doctor has seen him like this but I can only ask.
     
  9. Shedrech

    Shedrech Volunteer Moderator

    Dec 15, 2012
    8,077
    Yorkshire
    hi @Pierwalker
    if your wife is clutching on to you whilst walking arrange a check with an Occupational Therapist (talk to the GP and Social Services) to see if a wheeled walker (dad had a 3 wheeled one that looked similar to a shopping trolley) would support her ... the problem is, if she pulls on you and you both fall you could both be injured, which is not what you want at all
    dad felt much more secure using his walker as it took his weight easily
     
  10. chick1962

    chick1962 Registered User

    Apr 3, 2014
    11,282
    Female
    near Folkestone
    My husband was on memantine and the effects were not good . It seemed he declined quickly and was always tired and sleepy .After 2 years a new consultant changed his memantine to rivastigmine and all over sudden I got my husband back . He is alert, talkative and much more himself again . Might be an idea to see if a change in meds would be of help
     

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