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General Anaesthetic

Cath59

Registered User
Jan 23, 2015
46
I hope I'm worrying unnecessarily, but I remember reading on here about general anaesthetic coming with a risk of permanently worsening dementia. Does anyone know how likely this is? My mother has broken her hip, and is due for surgery tomorrow. There really isn't any choice, as it's not the sort of thing that can be done under local anaesthetic, and she can't be left as she is. My concerns aren't helped by the fact that she's been in hospital a couple of times recently, and both times quickly became completely delusional, although normally she can be quite sensible, though her memory is shot, and she can't make anything work. How would I be able to distinguish between any effects of the anaesthetic and the effects of being in hospital which would hopefully wear off? I know the obvious answer to that one is wait and see, but I can't help worrying! Advice from anyone with any experience of this, reassuring or not, would be helpful.
 

2jays

Registered User
Jun 4, 2010
11,598
West Midlands
My mum broke her leg/hip at Christmas. She was totally confused whilst in hospital and if my sister and I hadn't taken turns to be with her I think she would have starved and had dehydration.

She would not (couldn't) co-operate with the Physio and there was a possibility that she wouldn't be able to go back to her care home because she was so confused and wouldn't walk. Thankfully the care home did take her back.

3-4 months later mum now walks, feeds herself and tho she is further down the road with her dementia, she is so much better than she was in hospital.

xx


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susy

Registered User
Jul 29, 2013
801
North East
Having a broken hip itself often leads to an increase in confusion. This often doesn't last too long. Maybe a few weeks. The anaesthetic can make things worse you are right, is the anaesthetist aware that she has dementia? Is he going to try to give a spinal anaesthetic first with a little light sedation (which also can increase the confusion).

Just make sure that the anaesthetist is fully aware of the dementia and you are worried and see what they say.
 

nmintueo

Registered User
Jun 28, 2011
847
UK
Try Advanced Search for Keyword(s): anaesthetic or anaesthesia, [Search Titles Only], and you'll find a good few previous discussions that are worth reviewing.
 

2jays

Registered User
Jun 4, 2010
11,598
West Midlands
One point - make sure she has enough pain killers

Broken hip, anaesthetic , hospital and pain are not a good mix - especially the pain as mum knew her leg hurt but not why it hurt. No wonder she wouldn't walk for the Physio as her pain relief wasn't enough. Once back "home" the carers sorted with the GP better pain relief than the hospital were giving her.

x


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BR_ANA

Registered User
Jun 27, 2012
1,079
Brazil
My mom (stage 6-7) had a hip surgery on feb, 2014.

Her dementia worsened before surgery due to pain and pressure wound (an hospital courtesy). After 2 weeks she was back on CH and after some weeks she was back on stage 6-7.

About 6 months ago she went to another surgery ( she was with tooth ache - so all her teeth removed with anaesthesia)

What I usually do is talk openly to anaesthesia's doctor of what is my mom health.