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Fussy Eating

Daddygee

Registered User
Jan 12, 2015
20
West Sussex
My wife has Parkinson Dementia for 5years she has been fairly healthy. Recently she has started "playing"with her food and not eating a lot, I have offered to help feed her but this has recieved a rebuff but occasionally she will happily let me help.
Has anybody had a similar experience or could give us advice
 

Shedrech

Volunteer Moderator
Dec 15, 2012
9,166
Yorkshire
Hi Daddygee
meal times can be challenging sometimes
dad goes through phases with his eating - at one point he just wasn't sure of the steps in the process so I made sure he could see what I was doing so he could copy me
sometimes he wasn't sure what food was what on the plate and that seemed to lead to playing with it - I often found stews were better than meat (which had to be cut up)and 2 veg, as then everything was in small chunks, mixed together and in the sauce, so he often just used a spoon to eat
and sometimes he just sits at the table and hasn't a clue so I don't even ask, I just say something pleasant and start feeding him as if it is what happens every day; sometimes he takes over, sometimes he seems so relieved not to have to think about anything but chewing and swallowing, which he does with his eyes closed
and at times he's more interested in the pudding than the main course and has that first
a bit of trial and error, I'm afraid
best wishes to you both
 

Jessbow

Registered User
Mar 1, 2013
3,044
West Hertfordshire
Does the food contrast with the plate? She may get frustrated and give up easily if she cant see perhaps while mash on a white plate.

I gave my mum a very straight sided dish an a spoon- as you swept with the spoon , food HAD to fall onto it

Finger food can be good, as can grazing, rather than 3 formal meals- if you are about the house,and not planning on going out, take your time try perhaps cereal, wait a bit, then toast cut into 'pop it in' sized pieces. A small table just to the side with food to pick up and pop in, in her own time.

Elevenses = small sandwich, again cut ready to just put in
1ish - fruit cut up , or perhaps cake

3 ish, cup of tea and cake or biscuit

teatime, dryish food, again just left to be eaten in own time, Quiche, cold meat cut up, a new potato or two.

Make it all mouth sized , Forget cutlery! Fingers may work better.

One of the happiest memories I have of my now late mum, as the pleasure on her face as she enjoyed a carvery lunch in a pub garden....eaten completely with her fingers, in her own time
 
Last edited:

mot

Registered User
May 4, 2016
73
USA
Hi Daddygee,

My mom went into memory care the first of July. In this facility the residents all have dementia and/or alzheimer's.

One thing that has surprised me is mealtime. Most of them don't eat a lot. Many of them play with their food or otherwise have odd behaviors with their food. There are a few that dig in and eat heartily, but for the most part I have found they don't seen to consume a lot of food.

I also have noticed that they have weekly weigh-ins, are given snacks several times a day, and that many will eat when assisted. Even some of the ones who flat out say "no" to food seem to automatically open their mouths when someone puts food on a fork or in a spoon and feed them.

The suggestions that have been made are great! Hopefully you will be able to sort it out and get her eating!!!!

What a lucky lady she is to have such a caring husband!!!

Keep us posted with her progress!

Mot
 

Daddygee

Registered User
Jan 12, 2015
20
West Sussex
Hi Daddygee
meal times can be challenging sometimes
dad goes through phases with his eating - at one point he just wasn't sure of the steps in the process so I made sure he could see what I was doing so he could copy me
sometimes he wasn't sure what food was what on the plate and that seemed to lead to playing with it - I often found stews were better than meat (which had to be cut up)and 2 veg, as then everything was in small chunks, mixed together and in the sauce, so he often just used a spoon to eat
and sometimes he just sits at the table and hasn't a clue so I don't even ask, I just say something pleasant and start feeding him as if it is what happens every day; sometimes he takes over, sometimes he seems so relieved not to have to think about anything but chewing and swallowing, which he does with his eyes closed
and at times he's more interested in the pudding than the main course and has that first
a bit of trial and error, I'm afraid
best wishes to you both

Hi Shedrech
Thank you for the advice I will give it a try
 

Daddygee

Registered User
Jan 12, 2015
20
West Sussex
Does the food contrast with the plate? She may get frustrated and give up easily if she cant see perhaps while mash on a white plate.

I gave my mum a very straight sided dish an a spoon- as you swept with the spoon , food HAD to fall onto it

Finger food can be good, as can grazing, rather than 3 formal meals- if you are about the house,and not planning on going out, take your time try perhaps cereal, wait a bit, then toast cut into 'pop it in' sized pieces. A small table just to the side with food to pick up and pop in, in her own time.

Elevenses = small sandwich, again cut ready to just put in
1ish - fruit cut up , or perhaps cake

3 ish, cup of tea and cake or biscuit

teatime, dryish food, again just left to be eaten in own time, Quiche, cold meat cut up, a new potato or two.

Make it all mouth sized , Forget cutlery! Fingers may work better.

One of the happiest memories I have of my now late mum, as the pleasure on her face as she enjoyed a carvery lunch in a pub garden....eaten completely with her fingers, in her own time
Hi Jessbow

Thank for the advice I am in the process of trying it out
 

Daddygee

Registered User
Jan 12, 2015
20
West Sussex
Hi Daddygee,

My mom went into memory care the first of July. In this facility the residents all have dementia and/or alzheimer's.

One thing that has surprised me is mealtime. Most of them don't eat a lot. Many of them play with their food or otherwise have odd behaviors with their food. There are a few that dig in and eat heartily, but for the most part I have found they don't seen to consume a lot of food.

I also have noticed that they have weekly weigh-ins, are given snacks several times a day, and that many will eat when assisted. Even some of the ones who flat out say "no" to food seem to automatically open their mouths when someone puts food on a fork or in a spoon and feed them.

The suggestions that have been made are great! Hopefully you will be able to sort it out and get her eating!!!!

What a lucky lady she is to have such a caring husband!!!

Keep us posted with her progress!

Mot
Hi Mot
Thanks for your kind words they are appreciated.
I hope your Mom is well
 

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