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further testing?

peterrabbit

Registered User
Jun 18, 2016
135
mum's GP thought she had old age memory etc problems than dementia as such, she left so another sent her for a short test with a nurse, she said if it's not bothering her then the further testing at a memory clinic may not yield much benefit and to keep socialising, GP this morning said a referral is up to us, no advice really. So what do we do? I've heard there are false positives false negatives, mum doesn't like tests but would probably go with me.
 

Cat27

Volunteer Moderator
Feb 27, 2015
11,355
Merseyside
Personally I'd get her diagnosed as it can help with an attendance allowance claim & with social services if care is needed.
 

WORRIER123

Registered User
Oct 1, 2015
1,174
Personally I'd get her diagnosed as it can help with an attendance allowance claim & with social services if care is needed.
I agree get a diagnosis even thought I found they really didn't want to put a label on memory loss as dementia. Good luck
 

Rodelinda

Registered User
Jun 15, 2015
172
Suffolk
I agree; my mum (who lives with me) wouldn't go to the memory clinic to start with but did about a year ago; luckily all the health professionals including in the hospital where she had a spell earlier in the year simply assumed she did have dementia and referred us to the dementia team etc (which was really helpful). Although nothing can be done about her vascular dementia the diagnosis has helped: with attendance allowance (which I finally claimed for her a few months ago); a few months after the diagnosis I registered the EPA I'd held for some years when it became obvious that she really didn't have any understanding of money; it's also on her hospital and medical records; it also helped validate my role and has given me confidence that I am quit legitimate in my concerns and helps me with decisions. To be honest though it didn't make any difference with health professionals as they had long accepted that she needed a lot of care and had me down as her carer and were always very happy to talk to me and have me in at all consultations and let me visit in hospital at any time. So as long as she is happy to go, I would take up the offer of a referral to the memory clinic. All the best. Sue
 

peterrabbit

Registered User
Jun 18, 2016
135
thankyou, the consensus seems to be to be referred, as long as mum herself says so too. we already get AA thanks, and I have been able to take mum to the surgery and hospital as her son ok, so far at least.
 

peterrabbit

Registered User
Jun 18, 2016
135
I agree; my mum (who lives with me) wouldn't go to the memory clinic to start with but did about a year ago; luckily all the health professionals including in the hospital where she had a spell earlier in the year simply assumed she did have dementia and referred us to the dementia team etc (which was really helpful). Although nothing can be done about her vascular dementia the diagnosis has helped: with attendance allowance (which I finally claimed for her a few months ago); a few months after the diagnosis I registered the EPA I'd held for some years when it became obvious that she really didn't have any understanding of money; it's also on her hospital and medical records; it also helped validate my role and has given me confidence that I am quit legitimate in my concerns and helps me with decisions. To be honest though it didn't make any difference with health professionals as they had long accepted that she needed a lot of care and had me down as her carer and were always very happy to talk to me and have me in at all consultations and let me visit in hospital at any time. So as long as she is happy to go, I would take up the offer of a referral to the memory clinic. All the best. Sue[/QUOTE

Sue, hope your dear mum is doing ok, it's good she lives with you I would say.
 

Aisling

Registered User
Dec 5, 2015
1,806
Ireland
mum's GP thought she had old age memory etc problems than dementia as such, she left so another sent her for a short test with a nurse, she said if it's not bothering her then the further testing at a memory clinic may not yield much benefit and to keep socialising, GP this morning said a referral is up to us, no advice really. So what do we do? I've heard there are false positives false negatives, mum doesn't like tests but would probably go with me.

Yes I think you should ask for referral to memory clinic.

Aisling
 

BIWO

Registered User
Sep 1, 2016
81
Bedfordshire
I persuaded my Mum to go to the memory clinic as the local GP around here was not allowed to prescribe the dementia tablets aricept/donezepil until she had been seen by the Consultant at the memory clinic.At that stage she could not see the point but the tablets at least kept her 'more balanced' and stoppped her seeing the 'imaginary people.
Also the Memory Clinic can put you in touch with local groups for local support etc.
 

Rodelinda

Registered User
Jun 15, 2015
172
Suffolk
[

Sue, hope your dear mum is doing ok, it's good she lives with you I would say.[/QUOTE]

Thanks. She's OK but it's getting more difficult and I have real problems engaging her with anything these days what with her hearing (she won't wear her hearing aids)/cognition and her poor eyesight (AMD bad in one eye and forgets to wear glasses which help the other eye). She sleeps a lot. She eats well. She is quite demanding on me though which given that I'm still trying to do some work (from home, freelance and I've had a lot this year), have a large (wild would be polite) garden, an old house that needs lots of TLC and a lot of interests which require work (like playing the violin and involvement in local charities) is a bit hard. Take care. Sue
 

Debbs3006

Registered User
May 23, 2016
27
I would definitely get her referred if possible. It helps with other services, although these are limited, but also in addressing yours and mums needs at an early stage. GP's are often reluctant to refer and leave it to families to make the decision which is wrong. Even if the memory clinic feels they can't give you a definitive diagnosis at this stage, it gets you into the system


Sent from my iPhone using Talking Point
 

peterrabbit

Registered User
Jun 18, 2016
135
Thankyou for your comments, next time we see the GP or nurse we will ask a few questions about a referral, mum isn't so interested, we'ld need to talk about it a bit more, it wasn't the main thing last time we went, or we can see the nurse who did an assessment again she said.
 
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arielsmelody

Registered User
Jul 16, 2015
516
If your mum is mostly OK at the moment, if you haven't got LPA for finance and health and welfare set up, make sure you get them organised as soon as possible while there is no question that she has capacity. It makes things so much easier later on.
 

peterrabbit

Registered User
Jun 18, 2016
135
[

Sue, hope your dear mum is doing ok, it's good she lives with you I would say.
Thanks. She's OK but it's getting more difficult and I have real problems engaging her with anything these days what with her hearing (she won't wear her hearing aids)/cognition and her poor eyesight (AMD bad in one eye and forgets to wear glasses which help the other eye). She sleeps a lot. She eats well. She is quite demanding on me though which given that I'm still trying to do some work (from home, freelance and I've had a lot this year), have a large (wild would be polite) garden, an old house that needs lots of TLC and a lot of interests which require work (like playing the violin and involvement in local charities) is a bit hard. Take care. Sue[/QUOTE]

my mum's ok too, just frail, old age: very tired, weak on her legs, the memory probs, more housebound, I care and help and have mental health problems myself. my mum sleeps a lot, and eats well too. what is it like taking her to the memory clinic may I ask? its good of you to care for her, even though difficult at times.
 
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WestCountryGirl

Registered User
Jul 27, 2016
100
For my Mum, in Dorset, the process was as follows:

Two visits from Memory Team (one with me present, one without)
One appointment with Memory Nurse for Cognitive Testing (my presence not required)
CT brain scan
One appointment with Consultant Psychiatrist resulting in Alzheimers diagnosis
During appointment with Consultant Mum offered 'memory tablets' but refused

You do not mention your Mum having any denial or anger issues so a diagnosis could very well result in further help being available. If your Mum refuses help (where found to have capacity) then all Professionals will withdraw 'faster than you can shake a stick'.

Perhaps you can keep your Mum engaged with the process by saying that any help is for you as opposed to her.
 

peterrabbit

Registered User
Jun 18, 2016
135
For my Mum, in Dorset, the process was as follows:

Two visits from Memory Team (one with me present, one without)
One appointment with Memory Nurse for Cognitive Testing (my presence not required)
CT brain scan
One appointment with Consultant Psychiatrist resulting in Alzheimers diagnosis
During appointment with Consultant Mum offered 'memory tablets' but refused

You do not mention your Mum having any denial or anger issues so a diagnosis could very well result in further help being available. If your Mum refuses help (where found to have capacity) then all Professionals will withdraw 'faster than you can shake a stick'.

Perhaps you can keep your Mum engaged with the process by saying that any help is for you as opposed to her.
thankyou diannelouise. we'll talk with her GP or nurse again, she isn't bothered about going herself though. the nurse seemed to say she wouldn't want to go through it aand if it's not bothering her, and for maybe little benefit. I hope your mum is ok