• All threads and posts regarding Coronavirus COVID-19 can now be found in our new area specifically for Coronavirus COVID-19 discussion.

    You can directly access this area >here<.

Frontotemporal Dementia

Heartbeat

Registered User
Sep 24, 2015
10
Thanks Heartbeat.

It can be hard especially when they pick up on something and get totally the wrong meaning from it or completely misinterpret it but no matter what you say they still keep going back to the misinterpretation. I Can't say I've found the answer of successfully dealing with it.

I know what you mean regarding 'get well soon', most illnesses there is some hope that someone can get well again but it's not likely a cure for dementia will be found in time for our OH's. We can just try and make the best of things and make some good memories whilst we can and for the bad times try and deal with them as they arise.
I don't know if you have found this, but never argue or try to reason with them. Just agree and then try and distract them. Move on to something else. It was a suggestion from my son. I have tried it and it works, at least for us.
 

kezzahana

Registered User
Aug 3, 2014
8
Kent
:confused: My Husband of 86 hasFTD and I would like to chat with likewise carers
my husband has FTD and is 51. We have a 2 year daughter and find getting support a real challenge. Most organisations seem at a lost how they can help us as I work part time to support our family. Trying desperately to find activities for him to do while I am at work instead of wandering the streets but everything is so expensive with a carer too.
 

Nanna Spain

Registered User
Oct 22, 2015
3
Nanna Spain

My husband has frontal lobe syndrome, caused by a stroke that damaged that part of his brain. He is happy sitting watching DVDs or researching his family tree for hours on end, but is gradually retreating from socialising as he doesn't like noise.
My main problem at the moment is he doesn't like being asked what he is doing, he says I am interrogating him, and the other day I said the room was hot and had he put the radiator on, and he came right in my face with his teeth gritted and told me not to talk to him like that.
I know he has no insight into his behaviour but have to spend my days walking on eggshells and our daughter is getting concerned as to how he could get with our 10 year old grandson.
 

esmeralda

Registered User
Nov 27, 2014
3,074
Devon
Hello Nanna Spain and welcome from me too.

I am very sorry that you are having such difficult times. Your husband's behaviour sounds frightening and it's so upsetting when someone you love acts so out of character. Sadly you do have to be aware that there should be a risk to yourself and other people, especially your grandson or other children. It may not get to this, but it is important that you have a plan should you feel in danger. For example, have somewhere safe you can go and lock the door - most likely the bathroom. Keep your mobile phone on you so you can call for help, and try not to let him get between you and the door so you can make an exit. I know these sound extreme measures, and I hope very much you don't have to take them but it's better to be prepared.

Hello to you too Heartbeat, I hope things are going ok.
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
 

Mrsbusy

Registered User
Aug 15, 2015
355
My husband has frontal lobe syndrome, caused by a stroke that damaged that part of his brain. He is happy sitting watching DVDs or researching his family tree for hours on end, but is gradually retreating from socialising as he doesn't like noise.
My main problem at the moment is he doesn't like being asked what he is doing, he says I am interrogating him, and the other day I said the room was hot and had he put the radiator on, and he came right in my face with his teeth gritted and told me not to talk to him like that.
I know he has no insight into his behaviour but have to spend my days walking on eggshells and our daughter is getting concerned as to how he could get with our 10 year old grandson.
Welcome to TP nanna Spain. My dad can be like walking on eggshells but refuses to get any help or acknowledge it! Drives me insane and everything is never his fault always someone else. Anyway what I was going to suggest is where your grandchild is concerned explain in basic speech to your grandson that his grandfathers not well, on the basis of his brain wires are all tangled up so it doesn't always work properly but grandad doesn't realise that so it's our secret. Then try to keep grandsons visits if possible to short but regular visits about an hour tops as it will be enough for both of them I would think. Let your grandson take the lead as it depends if he's sensitive like my son and some days tolerate more than others. But make it clear to him that once he's ready to go then just say the word and we will go. Obviously it's lovely if on good days he can interact with his grandad by helping him do a jigsaw etc but if he knows he can retreat if he needs to he may feel better.

My son is 15 and has been over exposed to this disease and now suffers from anxiety attacks due to the unpredictability of it all, with having to be on call to my parents all the time and never knowing what to expect, so it's taken its toll. That's why I have made the above suggestions. Hope they help.
 

Bestgirl

Registered User
Oct 31, 2015
39
London, Ontario
just coping

My husband is 84. Today he gets an MRI to let us know what type of alzheimers he has. He was diagnosed about 5 years ago and has been on a pill since then which has slowed the process. It is beginning to pick up pace with with hallucinations. I'm hoping after the MRI he can get some medication to help with those. I wold be interested in keeping in touch with you. I live in London Ontario
:confused: My Husband of 86 hasFTD and I would like to chat with likewise carers