1. Suzanna1969

    Suzanna1969 Registered User

    Mar 28, 2015
    346
    Essex
    Mum, 81, was diagnosed with Vascular Dementia a few years ago. Following a series of strokes she has gone from being forgetful to not being able to do basic tasks, sobbing uncontrollably most mornings, forgetting who I am, being totally vague and asking for her parents. She has also lost much of her vocabulary as a result of the latest TIA. She still knows, I think, what she wants to say most of the time but they don't seem to be able to cross the bridge from her brain to her mouth so she can't explain why she's upset, how she feels or even have a basic conversation.

    This has been an enormous strain on my Dad who was diagnosed about the same time as Mum with Vascular Parkinsonism. He is now barely mobile and cannot leave the house without help. Up until now they've worked together ok with my help. Dad has been the brains and Mum has been the brawn so to speak.

    Mum's deteriorating condition has really taking its toll on Dad and he is struggling to understand the effects of dementia, that logic has no place any more and that she needs to be supervised for most tasks. I gave up work a few months ago to look after them, I do all the shopping, prepare meals in advance, take them for hospital appointments, Over 60s Club etc but he insists I don't spend too long with them at home (you have your own life to live etc etc) and that they can manage with stuff around the house by themselves.

    Sadly this is no longer true.

    Dad has been worrying me lately with forgetting important stuff and events. He forgot that he'd been told one of his ex colleagues had died, he forgets about what appointment I am taking them to the next day and often rings me just half an hour after I've left to ask what time I'll be round, even when I've written it on the white board we keep on the tea trolley which has the week planned out. He also struggles to follow when I am journey planning, times for pick up, dropping off him or Mum etc.

    At his last neurological appointment a couple of weeks ago I mentioned to the doctor quietly that I felt he is showing signs of minor cognitive impairment and asked if she could refer him to the Memory Clinic. Believe it or not she forgot :rolleyes: but I have chased it up and we should be hearing soon, however I am wondering now what purpose this will actually serve?

    As Dad's condition is vascular he doesn't respond to the drugs normally used to treat Parkinson's and I can't see that this will be any different when it comes to his memory and cognitive skills. I am now worrying that all an appointment at the Memory Clinic will achieve is to make him feel even more depressed and aware of his deterioration.

    Does anyone have any experience of what might happen to someone with Vascular Parkinsonism being diagnosed with Minor Cognitive Impairment, especially with regards to treatment? And could this become full on dementia?

    (I'm also posting this on the Parkinson's forum in the hope that I can find someone who's also been through this)
     
  2. Ash148

    Ash148 Registered User

    Jan 1, 2014
    276
    Dublin, Ireland
    Dear Susanna, I can't advise but can empathise. My dad is also following mum on the dementia journey, albeit in gentler fashion so far. It seems particularly cruel, but having a partner with dementia is apparently one of the biggest risk factors for dementia.
     
  3. Dayperson

    Dayperson Registered User

    Feb 18, 2015
    277
    Female
    Shropshire
    Suzanna1969, I'm sorry to hear about your parents story. I'm worried for my mum who is showing signs of depression and / or dementia. I think it started when she had several operations a few years back but her dad had Alzheimer's and now I found out today that her only surviving aunt has it too. I'm wondering whether this will have an effect on her by making her more depressed and making her symptoms worse quicker once her aunt dies?
     
  4. henfenywfach

    henfenywfach Registered User

    May 23, 2013
    333
    rct
    Hi!..
    My dad has dementia with lewy bodies. Thats alzheimers symptoms with parkinsonian symptoms. The alzheimers symptoms are medicated think theres only 1% improvement of his cognitive abilities.

    No legal medication according to nice guidlines for dlb.

    Im not an expert but i understand that vascular cant be medicated as it a blood supply ..and i am aware that some people have medication for parkinsons but not for parkinsonian symptoms.

    Sorry cant offer any other info...and my mum also awaiting memory clinic appointment!

    Best wishes

    Sent from my GT-I9505 using Talking Point mobile app
     
  5. Suzanna1969

    Suzanna1969 Registered User

    Mar 28, 2015
    346
    Essex
    Dad is now on Levodopa. It usually produces a marked improvement in Parkinson's sufferers. Because his condition is vascular the improvement isn't so dramatic but any improvement is better than where he was. Even now he struggles for several minutes to stand up from a chair and can't walk without a frame. He also suffers badly from 'freezing'.

    If his mind starts to go too I really don't know what we'll do. He is in denial about some of the other effects of his condition, saying that the potatoes I buy have skins that are too thick and make them difficult to peel, or that the tomato skins are very thick and make them difficult to slice, when of course it's his hands that are letting him down.

    They both have so many hospital appointments between them I do see why he gets confused, however there's no hiding from the fact that he can't follow me when I explain what is happening the next day if there's more than thing we have to do or place we have to go. :(
     
  6. henfenywfach

    henfenywfach Registered User

    May 23, 2013
    333
    rct
    Hi
    Somedays im sure like me youre on auto pilot and if you stop for too long. Or take time out.youre far more tired.
    With dlb my dad cant percieve 3d so he walks in to everything..sleep disorder and short term memory shot and long term sometimes fades.. hes still mobile and independant with considerable risk. Blood pressure can drop at any point..and hes unaware of stuff he does....
    He attends as many groups and activities as we can..because if hes sat in the house in warm temps hes just asleep in the chair all the time. Not good. He does pottery choir craft and the theraoeutic qualitues are fantastic.

    Even if like myself you stay very involved...meeting other people with similar experiences benefits carers and those with a diagnosis.

    Best wishes

    Sent from my GT-I9505 using Talking Point mobile app
     

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