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Father’s Alzheimer’s sudden decline

Norris3

New member
May 21, 2022
5
0
Hi my name is Lindsay and I live in Vancouver, Canada. I have just returned home from a month visiting my parents in the UK. I went to see my Dad who has just turned 89. He was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s about a year ago. He was I would say early stages until a few weeks ago. My Mum (84) popped out briefly, and when she came back he was behaving as though he had a stroke and could not speak properly. The paramedics came and were apparently v.good and thorough. They determined that he had not had a stroke, that it was the Alzheimers, and that he did not need to go to hospital. However, he has never recovered, and seems now to be in the middle stages of Alzheimers, where he can no longer be left alone, finds it hard to articulate, and gets confused easily. What I don’t understand is why he still has not been seen by a Dementia Dr. He had been “signed off” from them after his initial diagnosis. Since the incident we have had no direction on whether he medication should change, and no explanation or examination of why the dramatic change. Is what happened to my Father normal and just the way things are? As that seems to be the message we are getting. The Admiral Nurses have been great with Mum, and she is waiting for social services to contact her for support. Thanks Lindsay
 

Sueperzoom

Registered User
Aug 15, 2021
36
0
Does your dad have vascular dementia? Something similar happened with my dad a while ago. I was talking on the phone to him and his voice sounded different and he was slurring words. He said he didn't feel quite right. I went driving round there like a crazy woman thinking he might be having a stroke but it turns out he wasn't. The doc said with vascular dementia they can have a sudden decline like that and then level off for a while.
 

jennifer1967

Registered User
Mar 15, 2020
12,605
0
Southampton
it goes in steps. drop big step down then goes along then big step down. if you are worried, may need to phone the gp. we had the test and diagnosis then the gp took over. i phone the gp if there is something wrong and either they deal with it or referred to appropriate department. mental health for tablets to control symptoms. you are basically left to get on with it.
 

Scarlet Lady

Registered User
Apr 6, 2021
225
0
Hi, Lindsay. So sorry this has happened to your dad. Unfortunately in the U.K., there is little medical follow up once a person has been discharged from the Memory Clinic. The responsibility is passed to the GP and experiences vary as to how useful this is. You haven't said if your dad has been prescribed medication for his AD. If he is on Donepezil, for example, it’s worth checking this out, because I know my late aunt had some dreadful episodes where we thought she was dying, which turned out to be extreme anxiety attacks caused by the medication. Even if it’s not serious, it can still mean a decline in cognitive function. Most healthcare professionals will shrug their shoulders and say there is little they can do.
Keep the Admiral Nurses onboard, they are truly worth their weight in gold and will go where Angels fear to tread!
 

Norris3

New member
May 21, 2022
5
0
Does your dad have vascular dementia? Something similar happened with my dad a while ago. I was talking on the phone to him and his voice sounded different and he was slurring words. He said he didn't feel quite right. I went driving round there like a crazy woman thinking he might be having a stroke but it turns out he wasn't. The doc said with vascular dementia they can have a sudden decline like that and then level off for a while.
I wondered whether that might be the case after the incident. But no one has seen him to assess.
 

Norris3

New member
May 21, 2022
5
0
Hi, Lindsay. So sorry this has happened to your dad. Unfortunately in the U.K., there is little medical follow up once a person has been discharged from the Memory Clinic. The responsibility is passed to the GP and experiences vary as to how useful this is. You haven't said if your dad has been prescribed medication for his AD. If he is on Donepezil, for example, it’s worth checking this out, because I know my late aunt had some dreadful episodes where we thought she was dying, which turned out to be extreme anxiety attacks caused by the medication. Even if it’s not serious, it can still mean a decline in cognitive function. Most healthcare professionals will shrug their shoulders and say there is little they can do.
Keep the Admiral Nurses onboard, they are truly worth their weight in gold and will go where Angels fear to tread!
Thanks for your reply. He is on Memantine hydrochloride.
 

Norris3

New member
May 21, 2022
5
0
it goes in steps. drop big step down then goes along then big step down. if you are worried, may need to phone the gp. we had the test and diagnosis then the gp took over. i phone the gp if there is something wrong and either they deal with it or referred to appropriate department. mental health for tablets to control symptoms. you are basically left to get on with it.
It does seem to be the case, and Dad still seems to be just in the hands of his gp.
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
18,843
0
South coast
The paramedics assessed him and they are very good at spotting strokes - they are trained to look for them. When OH suddenly lost mobility and fell I called an ambulance and although I had not spotted that he had had a stroke, the paramedics did and took him straight to hospital.
 

Jaded'n'faded

Registered User
Jan 23, 2019
3,399
0
High Peak
It does sound very much like a Trans Ischaemic Attack

 

Norris3

New member
May 21, 2022
5
0
The paramedics assessed him and they are very good at spotting strokes - they are trained to look for them. When OH suddenly lost mobility and fell I called an ambulance and although I had not spotted that he had had a stroke, the paramedics did and took him straight to hospital.
Thanks