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Experiences of carers

Reds

Registered User
Sep 5, 2011
541
Hertfordshire
Morning all

Wondering how people feel in general about having carers in their home. My husband has Alzheimer's and is in his sixties. I like to keep my home private apart from close family and friends.

Regards, Reds
 

Grannie G

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 3, 2006
70,710
Kent
Hello Reds

I didn`t regard carers as intrusive, I welcomed them as badly needed help for me.

By the time I got to that stage I would have opened my house to anyone who offered help.

I suppose it does depend on the carers though. Those I had were respectful of our home and only glad to help.
 

Izzy

Volunteer Moderator
Aug 31, 2003
61,166
68
Dundee
My experience is the same as Sylvia's. Over time you build up trust with them.
 
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Grannie G

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 3, 2006
70,710
Kent
Reds, I suppose it really does depend on the carers. I had agency carers , using Direct Payments. I don`t know if I`m out of date by now about available provision but it worked really well for me.

In my last house I helped care for my neighbour. He has SS carers and they were all lovely, very caring and considerate.

I`ve only had two not so good experiences. One carer was too young to cope with personal care for my husband and the other was a little intimidating with him and didn`t handle a tricky situation well. On both occasions I asked that these carers didn`t come back, gave the reasons, which were found to be valid,and no hard feelings were experienced.
 

opaline

Registered User
Nov 13, 2014
182
There will come a point when you will welcome them with open arms and I have also had nothing but positive experiences with carers. Firstly, from the local council for 6 weeks and now from an agency. You can opt for a system whereas you receive the money and employ someone of your choice, sure someone else will be along soon with more advise, x
 

carer21

Registered User
Jan 17, 2014
30
Hello. I understand your caution. I too was very wary of accepting people into the house. However once I'd taken the plunge I was very grateful for the support and found carers very respectful of our home. I did not go out at first until I felt comfortable leaving them in the house but they quite understood my caution and now I can go out for myself when they come. Remember you matter too!
 

Izzy

Volunteer Moderator
Aug 31, 2003
61,166
68
Dundee
There will come a point when you will welcome them with open arms and I have also had nothing but positive experiences with carers. Firstly, from the local council for 6 weeks and now from an agency. You can opt for a system whereas you receive the money and employ someone of your choice, sure someone else will be along soon with more advise, x
I use direct payments so employ our own carers. They are a godsend.
 

Reds

Registered User
Sep 5, 2011
541
Hertfordshire
Thanks for the replies.

How is it best to employ carers and I guess expensive?

Yes, its another change so something else to get used to.

Reds
 

Adcat

Registered User
Jun 15, 2014
287
London
I have a carer for dad via an agency at £16 per hour for companionship. I simply couldn't cope otherwise. I was beyond caring about the house and who entered it.
We have had the same carer since last August. Continuity is key.
Take care
 

stanleypj

Registered User
Dec 8, 2011
10,707
North West
Agree with responses so far. It does take a bit of getting used to - handing over the caring to someone who is, to start with, a stranger and having that stranger in your home. But there are all sorts of way more disturbing things you have to get used to once dementia strikes.:(

Of course, you need to know that you can trust the person you allow into your home. You should be able to trust someone from an agency but you can also find reliable people by asking around - for example, from people you meet at memory/dementia cafes etc.

It's not cheap but is a perfectly acceptable way of using Disability Living Allowance/Attendance Allowance/Personal Independence Payments.
 

Pegsdaughter

Registered User
Oct 7, 2014
128
London
We found that as mum had always had a cleaner upgrading to a carer was easier than if she had not been used to someone coming into the house on a regular basis.


Sent from my iPad using Talking Point
 

Sue J

Registered User
Dec 9, 2009
8,035
I knew what was happening to me when my symptoms started, and knew I needed help but I also very much didn't want it. I still don't but it is a necessity. I expressed all this to the HH and told her it is not personal . Resistance to having carers is seen by some professionals as a failure to acknowledge or engage yet as you say Reds it is 'normal' to not want strangers in your home, but understanding strangers can become friends:)
 

LizzyA

Registered User
Feb 21, 2013
72
Near Reading
Carers start from tomorrow for my mum, twice a day for 30 minutes a time plus a one hour laundry/housework visit a week. I am not sure how she will cope but it has reached the stage where not having them isn't an option. I hope that this will help manage the situation, keep her safe and me sane! We have gone via social services (mum is self-funding). X