1. Expert Q&A: Protecting a person with dementia from financial abuse - Weds 26 June, 3:30-4:30 pm

    Financial abuse can have serious consequences for a person with dementia. Find out how to protect a person with dementia from financial abuse.

    Sam, our Knowledge Officer (Legal and Welfare Rights) is our expert on this topic. She will be here to answer your questions on Wednesday 26 June between 3:30 - 4:30 pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

  1. Margaret W

    Margaret W Registered User

    Apr 28, 2007
    3,725
    North Derbyshire
    Mums face is red raw today. For the last 3 months, she has been troubled with her face, she has had antibiotics, hydrocortisone cream, and they have worked but as soon as they have run out, the problem is back. Her skin is crusted, her chin is almost bleeding, she says it is very itchy. I put Sudocreme on it today, don't know if I have done right or wrong. Any advice please, the doc will be rung on Monday, but I don't know why this keeps recurring. My daughter said "is it like excema?" and I think it might me, in which case stress comes to mind. Mum hates the home, she is not one to express complaint, but stress could be a possibility. In which case what treatments might there be?

    Thanks

    Margaret
     
  2. alfjess

    alfjess Registered User

    Jul 10, 2006
    1,213
    south lanarkshire
    Hi Margaret

    Sorry, I can't help at all, but your poor Mother.

    If she was prescribed steriod cream, do you think that would help?

    My Daughter has a skin condition and sometimes she has steroid cream.

    Love
    Alfjess
     
  3. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    #3 Margarita, Feb 3, 2008
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2008

    I am no expert , but my daughter used to sufferer from excema when younger so did I , they Never use to get it on the face , but I did when younger , side of my face cheek .

    My face would always feel very dry they , so I would rub it , then , the more I rub it , because it felt tight dry it would bleed , then it crusted , it felt so itchy I would rub it more so it would bleed . Mum use to take me to doctor they give me creams soon as it was gone it came back , because it still felt tight dry , because I was using perfume soaps

    ( I was told not to use prescribed steroid cream on the face all other parts of the body , but not the face )

    Then I released as I got older


    My mother brought me up washing my face with perfume soaps , I found out for myself that when I never use Soap on my face I did not get that , dryness on the side of my face . I would just use cleansing Milk to wash my face , I can not even use Simple soap that has no perfume , in it as it dry my face to much would bring back the excema on my face. I have to use a lot of moisturize on that side of my face when younger also now .

    when it clears up , tell staff they must moisturiser your mother face every day , after washing her face . also I find with my mother sides of her nose get very flaky dry , so I put Moisturiser, then NIVA cream they , other wise its drying out, she rub it and it go very red

    I use Simple Moisturiser as other Moisturiser just irritate that side of my face .
     
  4. poppet

    poppet Registered User

    Aug 3, 2007
    70
    hi margret,

    i am not a complete expert but my field of study requires me to have some knowledge of this area...and my son suffers from eczema. however, i must stress that the information i post here is NOT to replace what a qualified practitioner would diagnose and prescribe.

    there are many types of eczema and each have numerous causes...thus treatment is often trial and error...other conditions such as psoriasis are often mistaken for eczema, hence the need for appropriate medical intervention. my son uses aveeno cream...it has properties to reduce the itching as well as being an essential moistureisor...these moistureisors are necessary every day at least once a day if not more...depends on individual but, some of these can cause irritation themselves so if one is seeming to cause a 'flare up' then try another. soap substitutes are also another useful application...aqueous cream has now been found to be more beneficial as a soap substitute rather than a moisturisor as it has been seen to cause irritation...this latter point was found in children with eczema (in case you were interested!!!).

    it sounds like there has been a trigger/s, so it may take a while to find out what works /doesnt work...but good luck and let us know how you get on with the GP.

    poppet
     
  5. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    Yes I had to bath my children in aqueous cream , it very oily slippery , as they got older did not like using it , Only one of my daughter use it now , its very expensive in the chemist to buy . but they can get it on perception ,

    your right they My son who 28 now just does not like it , he likes a moisturizer that leave a nice fresh small in it , so he found Body shop products work for him .
     
  6. Nebiroth

    Nebiroth Registered User

    Aug 20, 2006
    3,518
    It could be eczema (I have it). Some people have allergies which can trigger it, in which case it is important to remove the trigger (such as a type of soap powder or perfume). In some people it is what is called "atopic" which means there is no known cause. This is most common in people with hayfever and asthma. It can also be triggered by stress.

    The usual treatment is to relieve the symptoms , often using a steroid cream. Normally, treatment will start with the lowest strength ointment, moving up in stages until the desired result is achieved; this is because prolonged use of strong steroids can lead to problems such as thinning of the skin. The cream will relieve the itch, breaking the itch-scratch-damage skin-itch cycle.

    It is also important to keep the skin moisturised so a different cream may be prescribed for this.

    Sometimes the scratching can damage to skin and open the way to infection (this is called "wet" eczema), so an antibiotic is used to treat that.

    Sudocreme can help moisturise which may alleviate the itch, and is a mild antiseptic - I can't see that it can do any harm.

    The treatments aim at helping with the symptoms rather than achieving a permanent cure. Often once brought under control, eczema may just go away and not need treatment for long periods of time. It may return at some point. Mine surfaces about every other year or so. I recognise it and start the cream right away rather than let it take a hold (resulting in my legs being ripped to bits by nocturnal scratching).

    Lots on eczema here at the Eczema Society.

    http://www.eczema.org/
     
  7. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    reminds me of what happen to me


    I got that on my hands , when I was 17 working in a hairdressers , it travel up my arms, it was horrible, pus would come out of my hands when I rub it , because when I rub it it felt better , but that was only for the moment because it made it sore afterwards .

    I had to give up hairdressing , went to a clinic that done patch skin tests on my back to see what was iterating my skin . They found washing up Liquid , set it of as it has a chemical that in shampoo , then even rubber gloves can set of the iteration , but Boots do special gloves , that does not iterating my skin .
     
  8. noelphobic

    noelphobic Registered User

    Feb 24, 2006
    3,452
    Liverpool
    I think you might be thinking of something else Margarita. Aqueous cream is generally very cheap to buy so would only be worth getting on prescription if you don't have to pay for your prescriptions.

    I do suffer from several skin conditions, all on my face unfortunately. I have rosacea and eczema, although I seem to be holding the eczema at bay at the moment. I am supposed to be on anti-biotics on a more or less permanent basis, but I don't really think they help.
     
  9. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    yes must be thinking of something else, just thought it was called that Just look it up and its not the one you bath with .
     
  10. Nebiroth

    Nebiroth Registered User

    Aug 20, 2006
    3,518
    H45 cream is relatively cheap and can soothe.

    Rubber gloves are a fairly comon cause of problems because many brands contain latex.
     
  11. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,419
    There is something that is used for washing that is quite expensive off prescription - my mother had it. Not an expert either, but it doesn't sound like psoriasis - I have that and (my version) is quite distinctive. My mother had something similar over her entire body and we never really did get it sorted out. Oral anti-histamines helped a bit. It was worse (actually started) when she was in hospital - it did occur to me that she might have been slightly allergic to a laundry product. Unfortunately, once the scratching starts it's almost impossible to deal with it - as the scratches start to heal they can itch as well and it's a vicious circle.
     
  12. noelphobic

    noelphobic Registered User

    Feb 24, 2006
    3,452
    Liverpool
    I think it may be Oilatum. I've never used it but I have heard that friends use it for themselves or their children. I don't know whether it would be suitable for use on the face or not though.
     
  13. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland

    We have a similar problem with John's heels. They are finally healing, in fact one is now completely dry, but both feet are still bandaged. They're terribly itchy, and the worry is, that once the bandages are left off, he'll just rub them sore again.

    As you say, vicious circle.
     
  14. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,419
    Might have been but I think it was called derma something.
     
  15. noelphobic

    noelphobic Registered User

    Feb 24, 2006
    3,452
    Liverpool
    I have Dermol 500 on prescription. It can be used as a soap substitute and/or a moisturiser. I only use it on my face though. I tried it in the shower once but it doesn't lather so I didn't feel clean!
     
  16. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    #16 Margarita, Feb 3, 2008
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2008
    Are they bandaged , because they still crack ?

    As I am wondering do they cream them with Vaseline or anything before they put the bandage on ?


    I think that was the main reason my kids stop using it , as they like taking showers also, maybe your just mean to soak in the bath with it , when the skin is very dry when it flays (sp) up.
     
  17. Nebiroth

    Nebiroth Registered User

    Aug 20, 2006
    3,518
    If someone has severe eczema then the affected parts may be "wet wrapped" in bandages. This is to keep a heavy application of ointments in contact with the skin, to help remoisturise it as quickly as possible, to prevent scratching and infection.

    The worst aspect of eczema is the itch, which can be unbearable. Even as a fulling cognisant adult I frequently found it impossible not to give the area a darn good scratch, even though I new it would make it worse and leave it sore and ripped up.

    It must be much worse with children or someone with dementia.
     
  18. gill@anchorage5

    gill@anchorage5 Registered User

    Apr 29, 2007
    211
    Southampton
    lotions & potions

    Hi Margaret

    Your poor Mum - eczma can be horribly irritating, and with a dementia sufferer telling them repeatedly not to scratch the affected area just doesn't register.

    Dad had a terrible outbreak of this last year and it drove him to distraction. We tried various lotions & potions from the GP - none of which worked (and some seemed to make it worse!) In the end we arranged privately to see a dermatologist as the waiting list on NHS was about 2 months & we couldn't bear to see him suffering like that for another 2 days, let alone another 2 months.

    In the end - what worked for Dad was Dermol 500 lotion, which we still use as a soap substitute and as a moisturiser & Dermovate Ointment which we use on the affected area when he has an outbreak. He gets both of these on prescription, but obviously what works for one may not work for another, so important for Dr or dermatologist to see your Mum & advise.

    I really hope you manage to get something that works for her as soon as possible.

    Love

    Gill x
     
  19. Nell

    Nell Registered User

    Aug 9, 2005
    1,170
    Australia
    Elderly skin tends to be dry and therefore itchy. It may be that your Mum has scratched her itchy skin and then contacted some sort of infection . . . ? As others have said, we are not able to diagnose so can only offer suggestions.

    WE have found Omega 3 oil tablets very helpful for Mum (and we all take them too!). They do seem (over the long term) to help keep the skin from drying out too much. If the research is to be believed they are also good for the memory, the finger nails and for emotional stabilty!! :D

    Anyway, some medications are contra-indicated for Omega 3 tablets, so you would have to check with your Mum's doctor first. Also, if she is not good at taking tablets it could be difficult, as they are quite large capsules.

    I am not claiming they are a "miracle" drug, but we have all found them useful. Just wanted to suggest another thing that could be helpful.

    Every best wish for a sucessful and lasting result.
     
  20. burfordthecat

    burfordthecat Registered User

    Jan 9, 2008
    1,707
    Female
    Leicestershire
    Hi Margaret

    I really feel for your mother. My daughter has been suffering from eczema since 10 months old and had a really bad outbreak on her upper arms and her face:(. After trying several emollients and creams the set which really worked for us was Diprobase bath emollient (which acts as a cleansing agent) and Diprobase cream as a mosturiser. Initally, she needed a steroid cream for a few weeks to "calm things down". After I had used steroid cream on her face for 4 weeks (which was as long as recommended) I has to continue with Diprobase. The improvement was not quick but things did improve. I have not had to use steriod cream on her for about a year now. I still use Diprobase mosturiser on her whole body twice a day and on her face four times a day.

    One thing which is worthing noting, most GP's say aqueous cream for eczema. My daughter reacted to aqueous cream and used to cry when I tried to apply it to her face. When the GP prescribed Diprobase the change was considerable. No longer did she run away at cream time but would remind me to apply it:eek: Both the bath emoilent and cream are available over the counter or on prescription.

    As I am sure many other members have mentioned the one thing which shoud be avoided at all times is normal soap, any products which contain perfume. It may be worth looking at "baby products" for your mother which are in their nature more kind to skin.

    Please let us know how you get on.

    Kind regard to you both

    Burfordthecat
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.