1. Expert Q&A: Living well as a carer - Thurs 29 August, 3-4pm

    As a carer for a person living with dementia, the needs of the person you care for will often come before your own. You may experience a range of difficult emotions and you may not have the time to do all the things you need to do. Caring can have a big impact on both your mental and physical health, as well as your overall wellbeing.

    Angelo, our Knowledge Officer (Wellbeing) is our expert on this topic. He will be here to answer your questions on Thursday 29 August between 3-4pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

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Discussion in 'I have a partner with dementia' started by Starbright, Jul 20, 2019.

  1. Starbright

    Starbright Registered User

    Apr 8, 2018
    402
    Female
    My oh has Vascular/Alzheimer’s amongst other health conditions, earlier on in the year he was about to have a total hip replacement due to arthritis(( we were given 4 weeks to decide whether or not to go ahead )) but he had a few Uti infections and so it was felt better not to do the op until he was ok.(( Given that he Will Not do anything he doesn’t want to and will become very angry if pushed)) his consultant feels he should have an injection into the hip muscle in theatre under general anaesthetic and this is my worry. If it doesn’t help to contain the pain then we have to reconsider, the hip replacement. He’s in a great deal of pain and spends most of the day in bed. I’m concerned about the anaesthetic and how it may or may not affect him ...there’s so much written about how general anaesthetic affects dementia....He’s on Codeine and paracetamol..
    Now I’ve written this it sounds a bit silly because I know he has to have the injection we don’t seem to have a choice really.
    Thank you for reading this
    A x
     
  2. Grahamstown

    Grahamstown Registered User

    Jan 12, 2018
    1,250
    East of England
    My heart goes out to you @Starbright because such pain is so difficult to deal with, for a person with this disease. My husband has had a painful knee for some time but he is feeling it worse now, but I don’t think I could put him through an operation. He had an injection before he became ill but they don’t last. Now it definitely restricts his desire to do much and he is spending a lot of time in bed. So I understand your dilemma in knowing what is best and I expect you will be guided by the doctors. It’s the rehabilitation that is tricky if a person doesn’t do the exercises. Good luck with making your decision.
     
  3. Loisand

    Loisand Registered User

    Dec 25, 2017
    122
    When mom broke her hip in February the bone consultant warned us that the anaesthetic would affect the AD, which it did straight after the operation, fast forwarding a few months I can honestly say that yes it did affect mom, but not to the degree I thought it would, she can't do stairs no more, but that's a blessing because she used to wander, and yes it has made her more incontinent, but the latter is that down to the anaesthetic or down to AD, she was urine incontinence before she went into hospital.....I hasten to add that he also said it would even itself out.
     
  4. Starbright

    Starbright Registered User

    Apr 8, 2018
    402
    Female
    Thank you @Grahamstown for your kind words, the rehabilitation is more of a worry than the operation but we have spoken to the surgeon and he was most reassuring so we will see how it all goes.
    Thank you again A x
     
  5. Starbright

    Starbright Registered User

    Apr 8, 2018
    402
    Female
    @Loisand
    Thank you ...he is not incontinent thankfully..cannot manage the stairs spends most of the day in bed he maybe comes down once and then back up an hour later. He has a balance problem after a stroke 18 months ago together with other health issues. If we can get him pain free it would be brilliant.

    A x
     
  6. Lawson58

    Lawson58 Registered User

    So sorry to hear of your predicament.

    I wouldn't think that the anaesthetic required for the injection would too major and it could be worth having a chat with your doctor about it. My husband has had several general anaesthetics since his diagnosis, one (the first) caused him some problems but the others were fine. We discussed the issue with his anaesthetist and they were able to use appropriate ones.

    If your husband has a lot of pain, it seems that you don't have too many options. I hope you can sort something out to help.
     
  7. Starbright

    Starbright Registered User

    Apr 8, 2018
    402
    Female
    Thank you @Lawson58 for your helpful advice, the injection is in 2 weeks time and we will meet with the anaesthetist before it’s done.
    A x
     
  8. Sirena

    Sirena Registered User

    Feb 27, 2018
    1,414
    Female
    My mother fell and broke her hip last summer so she had no choice but to have surgery. The surgery and the stay in hospital (10 days) did affect her, but a month later she was back to 'her normal'. She is in a care home and they were very good at rehabbing her, they have a team of people and they have the necessary kit and experience but it would be a lot more difficult if he was sent home to you for rehab. If the operation has to go ahead, it would be worth trying to ensure he gets a couple of weeks rehab afterwards.
     
  9. Starbright

    Starbright Registered User

    Apr 8, 2018
    402
    Female
    @Sirena .Thank for your advice ..The rehabilitation if he has to have a total hip replacement was discussed at length with the consultant and he did say I was correct to be concerned given my Oh inability to understand and Not to do anything he is asked to even for his own safety. That plus his balance issues after a stroke 18 months ago. So we wait and see how things go and if the hip replacement does become necessary then I will push for rehab.
    Thanks again A x
     
  10. Sirena

    Sirena Registered User

    Feb 27, 2018
    1,414
    Female
    Just to mention, the inability to follow orders is not necessarily a problem, as long as those doing the rehab have an understanding of dementia. So for example they would need to help, prompt and encourage a lot more than usual.

    The hospital physios were hopeless, they stood there issuing orders and then pronounced my mother could not even get out of her seat. Fortunately the manager of the CH anticipated this would be a problem so a week after the surgery she visited during a physio session - and using the right approach was able to get my mother out of her chair and walking a short distance.

    Re the safety issue, for the first few weeks back at the care home they had my mum on 30 minute checks. They put an alert mat on her chair (and on her bed at night) so that as soon as she stood up a carer could go to her aid. She refused to use a rollator but she would take a carer's arm to help her mobilise. That's just to give you an idea of what was involved, best of luck with your husband.
     

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