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Entertainment Ideas

Dgirl

Registered User
Sep 6, 2007
16
Dublin, Ireland
My mum has AZ. She is now 64 and was diagnosed about 5 years ago. What I am trying to do at the moment are find activities that she can do on her own to a) boost her confidence that she can still do something on her own without help and b) allow Dad even half an hour to read the paper or surf the net etc without having her follow him like a little puppy dog. She used to knit and we tried to get her to knit squares but she is not interested any more. She will help do a jigsaw a little. Does anybody have any ideas that worked for them? Obviously can't buy anything the 5 years plus on the box or she'll get upset or angry.
 

Grannie G

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 3, 2006
70,651
Kent
Hello Dgirl,

Unfortunately whatever I have found for my husband requires two to do, as there`s no way he can stay with any activity by himself.

Some people have enjoyed colouring in, patterns rather than childish pictures, and others like sorting through photos, postcards.

At my relatives support group this morning, we were given a list of activities, with links to ElderCare Online

http://www.ec-online.net/

Caregiver Support Network

http://www.caregiversupportnetwork.com/

Alzheimers & Dementia Care Channel

I haven`t looked at any of these links yet but they might be a starting point for you.

Take care xx
 

connie

Registered User
Mar 7, 2004
9,519
Frinton-on-Sea
Hi Dgirl, so good to know that you are trying to work with both mum and dad.

It is hard when ability to do things unaided creeps into the equasion. Whatever activity you employ for your mum, just a little tip I employed (only worked for a time)

I would sit Lionel down with his activity (crossword in his case), work with him for say 10 minutes, then say: lets both have some 'own' time, and set the "cooker pinger" for 15 minutes. Lionel responded to this for quite some time, would concentrate on his own, and I would do the essential phone calls etc.

I find this always works with all my 5 grandchildren. Never say "just a minute" always set the pinger for a set amount of time.

Might just buy dad a little 'me' time.