• All threads and posts regarding Coronavirus COVID-19 can now be found in our new area specifically for Coronavirus COVID-19 discussion.

    You can access this area by going to the Health and wellbeing forum >here< or you can directly access the area >here<.

Enquiry about mouthwash (or similar) which can be swallowed ... (no- alcohol)

kittiwake

Registered User
Oct 8, 2015
1
Hello, I hope that I have posted in the correct thread. I've tried searching on this subject but could not find a related thread already in existence...

My mum has been in a care home for over two years, and over that time has progressed from good self care (including toothbrushing) to almost no self care. Bathing and hair care seem to be good, but mum refuses mouthcare and her mouth and teeth are getting into a poor state.

She is always offered (and accepts) sweet biscuits with tea for supper, and I would like to find a way of easily 'de-sugaring' / plaque inhibition especially last thing at night. I have searched supermarkets and pharmacies for something suitable, and also asked for advice from a pharmacist and a dentist. The 'best' advice I could obtain was to find a mouthwash, but it would need to be OK to swallow (as mum doesn't really follow instructions reliably, and is likely to swallow anything that looks like a drink).

I've found an aloe-based mouthwash in a 'health food' type store, and the bottle label has no instruction saying ' do not swallow', which most other mouthwashes seem to have ( even those labelled for children..possibly because they contain fluoride). I'm thinking of trying this for my mum, but before I do, does anyone have any better suggestions? Are there any 'chewable / dissolvable' mouthcare products out there (that she could happily suck like sweets?)? I know that some chewing gums help to clean and freshen the mouth, but I don't want my mum risking swallowing gum.....

Thank you for any suggestions.... :)
 

Oxy

Registered User
Jul 19, 2014
955
I would ask Alzheimer sock or admiral nurse advice line for a recommendation. This problem must occur frequently. Dentist should know. In public toilets they have chewable things in vending machines but I have not given them a closer look so may be gum. I hope you find a solution.
 

CollegeGirl

Registered User
Jan 19, 2011
9,524
North East England
How about simply using water? If your mum is able to swish water around her mouth after eating sugary foods, that would help, and there would be no problem about swallowing it.
 

Lulu

Registered User
Nov 28, 2004
391
I am in the same boat. I recently contacted the makers of one of those chewable 'brushes' you see in service stations etc and I have very kindly been sent samples. The ones I have (perhaps they aren't all the same?) are triangular about the same thickness as a certain mint cake, not very big and they are very hard with a sharp point. I couldn't give Mum one of these as she would swallow and it could get stuck. I would be interested to know if you find a mouthwash, but for us I fear this would be used as a drink as Mum would be unable to rinse.
It is a problem, and one that causes me much concern.
 
Last edited:

arielsmelody

Registered User
Jul 16, 2015
516
I don't suppose it's enough, but if she ate cheese instead of sweet biscuits, the cheese is supposed to be much better for your teeth.
 

2jays

Registered User
Jun 4, 2010
11,598
West Midlands
If she must eat sweets, chocolate is the least damaging than most as it melts and washes away


Sent from my iPhone using Talking Point
 

jeany123

Registered User
Mar 24, 2012
19,036
70
Durham
If she must eat sweets, chocolate is the least damaging than most as it melts and washes away


Sent from my iPhone using Talking Point
When my grandson had his palate operation and was on a soft diet the specialist said don't let him have chocolate because it clings and is hard to get rid of,
 

2jays

Registered User
Jun 4, 2010
11,598
West Midlands
When my grandson had his palate operation and was on a soft diet the specialist said don't let him have chocolate because it clings and is hard to get rid of,


No chocolate that's tough

My info was from our dentist when the kids were young....

I guess basically it's no to sweets then :(


Sent from my iPhone using Talking Point