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Electronic tagging

Lila13

Registered User
Feb 24, 2006
1,342
But if you just left them unsupervised at the crawling stage far more would die or get seriously injured.

I've worked in children's hospitals and remember so many who'd had to be rushed in after near-fatal accidents, I'm sure many of them would have died if there hadn't been someone available to rush them in. But tagging wouldn't generally prevent such incidents.

Also remembering some of our own childhood incidents, things I did, things that happened to friends and relations, seems merely a matter of chance that we survived. Not that tagging would have helped in most of those cases.

Lila



Grannie G said:
I remember seeing an experiment with babies who were crawling, but stopped when the floor became glass.
 
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Lila13

Registered User
Feb 24, 2006
1,342
My mother was putting herself in danger when she wouldn't eat or drink enough. She put herself in danger when she went out after dark and fell in the road and nearly got run over. She may have put herself in danger by hoarding pills and then taking too many at once.

I am not sure how much of that was deliberately suicidal.

Lila



Grommit said:
Would AD sufferers draw the line at putting themselves in danger?
 

Tender Face

Account Closed
Mar 14, 2006
5,379
NW England
Skye said:
Not sure what point you're making either, Karen!:confused:

Are you saying that a carer is expected to give 24/7 care? I'm sorry, but I need to sleep too.:(
I'm not making any point - or any sense am I? :eek: :) Just thinking out loud ..... and great to see different ideas and points of views here ..... helping me at least to get my thoughts together on this ....

I was referring to the use of electronic tags (be they for newborn babies, dementia sufferers or anyone else vulnerable and already in a care setting be that in a hospital or somewhere else) as a subsitute for adequate supervision - and indeed security - dare I mention staff ratios/funding????? :eek:

Would you agree caring in the home setting for someone we love means we have our own in-built alarms .....and amazingly sustain levels of care beyond belief given the sleep deprivation? I'm afraid I'm old-fashioned - or a technophobe - or both .... but I like the 'human' touch....

My care worker has already mooted sleep in carers ..... should the need arise .....as an option to retain mum's ability to remain at home - that sat comfortably with me where the idea of 'tagging' mum does not ... and I confess that's probably because of a prejudiced view that 'tagging' is linked to someone having done something wrong ... and my first emotional knee-jerk reaction is to stamp my feet and protest that mum has not done anything to deserve this!!!!!

I guess I come at this too with the guilt package which says am I really keeping mum as safe as she can be? Yes, I can monitor her tablets, have a neighbour checks she locks her door at night, eliminate the need for her to ever switch on her cooker ....... and aware I must not let any prejudice of my own over-ride concerns for her safety when 'aids' may be available - and especially her own wishes if she can formulate them and express them (not to mention stick to them!) ..... but I don't mind admitting, it's hard ........ like now - when I need to be at my own house, knowing I have left her safe this morning but right now haven't got a clue what she is getting up to!!!!! :eek:

Clear as mud?

Love, Karen, x :)
 

Skye

Registered User
Aug 29, 2006
17,000
SW Scotland
Tender Face said:
I was referring to the use of electronic tags (be they for newborn babies, dementia sufferers or anyone else vulnerable and already in a care setting be that in a hospital or somewhere else) as a subsitute for adequate supervision - and indeed security - dare I mention staff ratios/funding????? :eek:
Agree, to a certain extent.:confused: But I'm thinking that should I be ill and John have to go into respite care, he would still want his daily walks. And I can't imagine there would be staff available to accompany him?........

Would you agree caring in the home setting for someone we love means we have our own in-built alarms .....and amazingly sustain levels of care beyond belief given the sleep deprivation? I'm afraid I'm old-fashioned - or a technophobe - or both .... but I like the 'human' touch....
Again, to a certain extent. While John is in the house, I'm aware of his needs. But I want him to retain some independence for as long as possible -- his basic human right -- but I worry when he goes out on his own, and a sensor would provide reassurance for both of us.:)

like now - when I need to be at my own house, knowing I have left her safe this morning but right now haven't got a clue what she is getting up to!!!!! :eek:

Clear as mud?
My feelings exactly.

I'm afraid the whole situation is fraught with 'what if?'s. I suspect that you're rapidly approaching the situation I'm in -- wanting them to retain as much independence as possible, but fearful of what might happen.

For my part, I'd welcome a sensor, but I can see that it's not for everyone.

Love,
 

noelphobic

Registered User
Feb 24, 2006
3,452
Liverpool
bernie said:
With respect I don't think that anything that stops a person being put into a home can be called not really caring.
Also with respect, I think that sometimes putting a person into a home is the only viable option and certainly does not imply that the person is not cared for.

I always find the terminology of being 'put' in a home very emotive, so apologies if you see this as an over reaction.

'Tagging' is also a very contentious and emotive issue, as evidenced by the posts here! I have reservations about the idea, but can also see the value. However, I was fortunate in that my mum was never a 'wanderer' and can see that it must be desperately worrying for those who care for someone who is.
 

noelphobic

Registered User
Feb 24, 2006
3,452
Liverpool
Skye said:
Agree, to a certain extent.:confused: But I'm thinking that should I be ill and John have to go into respite care, he would still want his daily walks. And I can't imagine there would be staff available to accompany him?........
Just wondered whether a care home would 'allow' a resident with dementia to go for a walk? :confused: Not trying to stir up any controversy here, and I know that residents of homes are not prisoners etc, but I would imagine that most homes would understandably be very worried at the prospect of a resident going for a walk. I would think they would be worried for the person's safety and also concerned that they would be held liable if anything happened to the 'walker'.
 

Skye

Registered User
Aug 29, 2006
17,000
SW Scotland
bernie said:
With respect I don't think that anything that stops a person being put into a home can be called not really caring.
I don't think a sensor would 'stop' a person being put in a care home. If the condition deteriorates to the extent that 24 hour supervision becomes necessary, a sensor is not going to be sufficient to sustain independent living.

At best, it will delay that situation. So in fact the sensor is only ever going to be a temporary measure, but as such still has merit IMHO.:)

noelphobic said:
Also with respect, I think that sometimes putting a person into a home is the only viable option and certainly does not imply that the person is not cared for.
I agree. I believe that a care home becomes inevitable at some stage for most of us, however much we would like to cope alone.. But I think we all want to delay it as long as possible.

Love,
 

Lila13

Registered User
Feb 24, 2006
1,342
One of the first things we asked about in the homes we visited for my mother was the garden, and whether residents were allowed to go out alone. The respite place had a garden and some guests did go out unaccompanied. But if they went out without pressing the relevant numbers an alarm went off so staff would always know when someone went out. There was CCTV so the receptionist would know when anyone arrived or left. I don't know what would have happened if my mother or any of the other guests had wanted to go outside the main entrance, but there was enough space inside the 4 "courts" of the building to satisfy most wanderers.

Lila

noelphobic said:
Just wondered whether a care home would 'allow' a resident with dementia to go for a walk? :confused: Not trying to stir up any controversy here, and I know that residents of homes are not prisoners etc, but I would imagine that most homes would understandably be very worried at the prospect of a resident going for a walk. I would think they would be worried for the person's safety and also concerned that they would be held liable if anything happened to the 'walker'.
 

dolly gee

Registered User
Mar 9, 2007
47
merseyside
Louise Lakey said:
Hello everyone,

I'm a new member of talking point - I recently joined the Alzheimer's Society as policy officer - so it is great to meet you all.

I'm currently updating the society's position on electronic tagging and technology to help with safer walking (or wandering). The current policy is available on our website but we are looking to develop this and understand the issues more fully.

As you may have seen this morning, the possibility of using electronic tagging has been on the news. I see some people have already started discussing this, which is really great. I would really like to understand what carers and people with dementia feel about electronic tagging, so that I can use this to inform the new policy.

If anyone has any comments on the current policy, or would like to share thoughts or personal experiences of electronic tagging with me, then it would be wonderful to hear from you.

Also, the Jeremy Vine show on BBC Radio 2 is currently running a phone-in on electronic tagging. See the website here. You can email comments on the website or if you would like to phone in the number is 0500 288291

Many thanks, Louise
Hi Louise i also read the news and have real concerns about taging,ie ther must be stringent guidlinses as to what stage and most certainly family concerns.I have like all web users i have concerns about my one mental state idont think i would willingly like one best wishes dolly gee
 

Adam

Registered User
Apr 23, 2007
1
Hi everyone,

My name is Adam and I am currently working for the South Manchester Reporter.

<<Details removed see http://www.alzheimers.org.uk/TalkingPoint/discuss/announcement.php?f=2&a=23 for more details - please can journalists approach the Alzheimer's Society press office rather than members of Talking Point. Thank you. Said (Website Manager) >>

I am writing an article on tagging, and it would be nice to know what someone local has to say.

Thank you in advance.
 

DeborahBlythe

Registered User
Dec 1, 2006
9,222
:confused: :confused: Hello Said, I've just noticed your message to the reporter here. Can anyone explain to me why journalists should not approach contributors here? I know that people don't want to be pestered at times of distress but the system leaves it in the hands of contributors whether or not to contact the journalist. Have I missed something here? Perhaps I am being naive but what is the big deal?
 

sunny

Registered User
Sep 1, 2006
598
Name?

Maybe we should call it a Locator (as that is the reason for wearing it really).
I am not comfortable with this whole idea, I don't know why it just doesn't feel right. Though I can see it could be useful in finding people who "wander" outside the home quickly before any harm comes to them.
 

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