1. John STC

    John STC New member

    Jul 20, 2019
    1
    I am looking for a new electric cooker with features to make it safer for my wife who has Alzheimer's. Any ideas would be gratefully received.

    John
     
  2. nellbelles

    nellbelles Volunteer Host

    Nov 6, 2008
    8,374
    leicester
    Hello @John STC and welcome to DTP
    That’s a difficult one to answer as change (even to simplify things) is usually very problematic.
    My first thought is have you an hidden isolator switch for the cooker to help keep your wife side while you are not there?
    Hopefully someone with more information to help you will also post.
    I hope you will continue to post now you have found us.
     
  3. Sirena

    Sirena Registered User

    Feb 27, 2018
    1,500
    Female
    I doubt you will find anything which fits the bill unfortunately. As Nellbelles has said, people with dementia cannot adapt to change so she'd find it hard to use anything new, and there is no way of ensuring people with dementia are safe around sources of extreme heat.

    I think you will just have to do what Nellbelles has said, ensure she can only use it when you're there to supervise. At some point she will have to stop using it entirely. My mother eventually couldn't use her cooker at all for safety reasons (she set fire to a crumpet under the grill) so the carers removed all the knobs and hid them so that only they could use it.
     
  4. Rosettastone57

    Rosettastone57 Registered User

    Oct 27, 2016
    973
    As others have said, unfortunately, your wife will need to be supervised with the cooker or someone else uses the cooker for her. My mother-in-law was incapable of learning anything new . In the end, her carers took over cooking
     
  5. Philbo

    Philbo Registered User

    Feb 28, 2017
    665
    Male
    Kent
    Hi @John STC

    You don't say whether it's a free-standing cooker you're after or a separate oven/hob?

    If it's the latter, then I know that both my son's went for induction hobs when they had new kitchens, partly as they considered them safer with young children. Although you can get some residual heat where a pan has been heating up, it quickly dissipates when removed as there is no direct heat. The controls are usually also tough sensitive segments on the glass top, so less likely to be miss-operated.

    A quick Google shows you can get free-standing cookers with induction hob, so worth considering if it's this sort you need? They look as though they are a bit dearer but may prove more suitable for your needs?

    When we were researching about new appliances, we found several of the online suppliers had technical advise helplines, who were usually very knowledgeable and may be able to advise, given your specific needs/concerns?

    Good luck
    Phil
     
  6. Duggies-girl

    Duggies-girl Registered User

    Sep 6, 2017
    1,487
    My dad has an induction job and we all have trouble using it. Perhaps it's just dad's one but you have to just touch the control a certain way, not too hard and not too soft. We don't use it much and dad certainly can't use it.

    It does have a lock function though.
     

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