Early Evening Confusion.

Discussion in 'ARCHIVE FORUM: Support discussions' started by Grannie G, Jan 12, 2007.

  1. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,586
    Kent
    #1 Grannie G, Jan 12, 2007
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2007
    My husband seems to be developing a pattern of , what I call, Lapses, in the early evening.
    He usually wakes up with the clearest head, [just `normal` confusion] following a good night`s sleep, then, as we progress through the day, seems to become more and more muddled.
    In the early evening, he doesn`t know who he is, who I am, where he is or where we live. Last night he asked why there were only 2 of us here and why no-one was downstairs. [We live in a bungalow]. I realized he thought we were in a house he lived in 50 years ago. It was a big, old house, and he let rooms off to all his friends.
    In addition, he begins to tremble and complains of dizziness. Then he becomes very tired and either sleeps in the chair for a while or has to go to bed.
    I want him to see our doctor or psychiatrist, and so does he. But when he wakes in the morning feeling fine, he changes his mind.
    Any advice please?
    Thank you, Sylvia
     
  2. Brucie

    Brucie Registered User

    Jan 31, 2004
    12,413
    near London
    Hi Sylvia

    This sounds to me like a form of sundowning, almost.

    I'd be arranging the appointment and simply say on the day "we're off to have that check-up at the doctors that we arranged" and if he queries it, perhaps say that it is all arranged now, and it will only take a short while and, anyway, it will be a nice trip out.

    Confusion often comes later in the day as they get tired and that accentuates the fuzziness of their brains [Ihave to say it does for me too - so is probably quite normal anyway, but obviously worse for someone with dementia]
     
  3. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,586
    Kent
    Thank you Brucie. I did wonder. I`ll see what happens over the week-end, then decide on Monday about an appointment.
    Regards, Sylvia
     
  4. Jann

    Jann Registered User

    May 24, 2006
    39
    tingewick, bucks.
    Hi Sylvia,

    My mother too becomes confused, fractious and disorientated as the day progresses.
    She is also sometimes confused on waking but after her meds, much improves.

    I'd certainly arrange an appointment as Brucie says; the dizziness may well be a cause for concern. I say this as my Mum has experienced much of this over the last few months and had a few fainting episodes.

    After extensive tests, heart monitoring, etc. they couldn't say what the problem was. Just before Christmas while I was there with her and Dad- and I really do not wish to scare you in any way - she deteriorated on a daily basis, so much so that she lost her mobility, powers of speech, became incontinent and we had to feed her.

    She had suffered a brain haemmorhage and was hospitalised to stem the bleeding. I am relieved to say she has now recovered her mobility and speech (as much as someone with AD can) and is back home so please do have him checked out.

    Wishing you all my very best.
     
  5. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    Hi Sylvia

    I'm getting a similar pattern with John. He likes to watch the soaps, they're the only TV he can cope with. I'm not sure to what extent he follows the plot, but because they're on every night, he knows the characters and regards them as friends.

    But increasingly he's falling asleep during them, and insists that I put him to bed immediately afterwards.

    But then he seems to wake up and become agitated. He is convinced that I have people in after he has gone to bed. Last night he came downstairs in his pyjamas to 'catch me out'!

    I try to make a joke of it, and during the day he will laugh, but in the evening the suspicion returns.

    I guess it's just another phase that will pass.

    Love,
     
  6. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,586
    Kent
    Thank you Jann and Hazel.

    I`m inclined to think the dizziness is caused by panic, but I`m not medically qualified, so will get him to the doctors.

    Today, he`s fine. Convinced it`s a case of mind over matter and is going to keep positive [his words, not mine]. I`ll see what this evening brings. There seems to be a nice film on this afternoon. We`ll watch it together.

    It`s so good to have people to compare notes with. Even though everyone`s an individual, there are variations of the same, which is a comfort.

    I`m so pleased you`ve reconsidered, Hazel.

    Love Sylvia x
     
  7. j.j

    j.j Registered User

    Jan 8, 2007
    91
    hi
    i experience the same thing with my mam, by t.time she says very similar things about where she lives and whom she lives with, she takes no medication so i cannot link it to that. we have our first attempt at respite next week and i was asked to take my mam there in the morning but i have asked if it would be possible to take her later in the day as she would be so much on the ball in the morning that she would point blank refuse to stay,
     
  8. jan.

    jan. Registered User

    Apr 19, 2006
    405
    Cheshire, UK.
    Hi Sylvia,

    I hope you won`t think i`m pushy:eek: ......but i`d definitely get that appointment at the G.P`s. for your husband. I hope you don`t mind me asking:eek: ....... does your hubby have Parkinsons? Just a thought, you understand. Hope he`ll soon be on a more stable road, it`s always such a worry when something "new" rears it`s ugly head.

    All the best,
    Jan. X :)
     
  9. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,586
    Kent
    Hi Jan, Parkinsons has never been mentioned. He only really trembles when he is afraid, but his balance is not good and he spills now, especially when he is carrying a cup of tea.
    Next time we see the doctor, I`ll try to get some more answers.
    Thank you, Sylvia x
     
  10. mel

    mel Registered User

    Apr 30, 2006
    1,656
    Sheffield
    Hi Sylvia
    mum doesn't have Parkinsons but she does and has trmbled for many years now. This is worse in the evening and the evenings are when she gets the most anxious but can't explain why....but complains of being "all over the place"
    Does your husband have diabetes at all? sometimes if mum has a snack in the evening this calms her.....
    Love
     
  11. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,586
    Kent
    Yes Wendy, My husband is type 2 diabetic.He used to be very good with his diet, but now he forgets what he`s eaten and eats more than he should. His blood levels are not too bad, but his condition has deteriorated over the years.
    When he gets anxious, he says it`s like a curtain being pulled down over his face, or a big black cloud over his head.
    It`s hard to put ourselves in their place, but I can understand the fear.
    Love Sylvia x
     
  12. mel

    mel Registered User

    Apr 30, 2006
    1,656
    Sheffield
    Hi Sylvia
    mum is type 2 also......when mum is anxious she covers her face with her hands saying"my face has gone"
    No matter how I try to reassure her at times like that I can't......Oh how I would hate to have that feeling of fear.........
    Love Wendy x
     
  13. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    Hi Sylvia & Wendy

    That feeling of fear sounds awful. I haven't had that (yet?) with John. Do you think it's to do with the diabetes?

    I feel fear too, but at least I can rationalise it. To have that black cloud every evening must be so depressing. You all have my sympathy.

    Love,
     
  14. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,586
    Kent
    My husband complains of 2 types of symptoms.
    One is a net curtain coming down over his face, like a fog.
    The other is `fuzzing` in his head.
    The curtain and fog makes him depressed but the `fuzzing` in his head terrifies him.He doesn`t hear voices or anything like that, nor does he hallucinate. It sounds to me as if he feels his brain is being scrambled.
    This usually happens late afternoon or early evening. It`s not sirprising he`s afraid.
    Sylvia
     

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