• All threads and posts regarding Coronavirus COVID-19 can now be found in our new area specifically for Coronavirus COVID-19 discussion.

    You can directly access this area >here<.

DWP - what happens when I tell them?

stuart642

Registered User
Jun 23, 2015
11
Hi All

I have just realised that I should have told the DWP that my Uncle went into a care home in August last year as he has dementia. As I was only appointed deputy by the Court of Protection 1/6/2015 I think I may have a good excuse however does anyone have an idea what the effect of me telling them is - will his pension be reduced for example. Would appreciate any comments.

Many thanks

Stu
 

jan.s

Registered User
Sep 20, 2011
7,352
68
If your uncle is self funding or CHC funded, there shouldn't be any change to his pension. If he's paid attendance allowance it may have an effect, but if it does, it just needs to be paid back.

I wouldn't worry too much about being late in telling them because I doubt it will have any effect on his payments, it's just a change of address.
 

stuart642

Registered User
Jun 23, 2015
11
If your uncle is self funding or CHC funded, there shouldn't be any change to his pension. If he's paid attendance allowance it may have an effect, but if it does, it just needs to be paid back.

I wouldn't worry too much about being late in telling them because I doubt it will have any effect on his payments, it's just a change of address.
Hi Jan

Many thanks I was hoping the answer might be something like that. There is no attendance allowance so nothing to pay back.

Thanks again!

Stu
 

Saffie

Registered User
Mar 26, 2011
22,507
Near Southampton
I thought AA was still paid if you are self-funding.
My husband's was. In fact it was increased to account for night care too.
Or was that because he was in a nursing home.
It does stop for hospital stays though.
 

jenniferpa

Registered User
Jun 27, 2006
39,448
Yes, if you are self-funding AA is still paid, but it isn't if you have CHC or some form of LA funding. The other thing that might be affected is pension credit.

I think Jan's point was that if he was self-funding, AA would still be paid but if he was getting CHC (or any LA funding) it should have been stopped but since he doesn't get AA, that's not going to be an issue.

Mind you, Stuart: if he is by any chance self-funding he should be getting AA.
 

Dustycat

Registered User
Jul 14, 2014
215
North East
I haven't told DWP yet that my Dad has been in care since November. Just not got round to it. He is self funding so not too worried. X
 

stuart642

Registered User
Jun 23, 2015
11
Yes, if you are self-funding AA is still paid, but it isn't if you have CHC or some form of LA funding. The other thing that might be affected is pension credit.

I think Jan's point was that if he was self-funding, AA would still be paid but if he was getting CHC (or any LA funding) it should have been stopped but since he doesn't get AA, that's not going to be an issue.

Mind you, Stuart: if he is by any chance self-funding he should be getting AA.
Hi Jennifer
Many thanks for the help. My uncle is self funding but as far as I am aware he does not received AA ( Attendance Allowance? ). I am guessing that this may not have been paid as he went straight into the care home as soon as we became aware he wasnt able to look after himself. Does this make sense and sound correct?
Regards

Stu
 

cragmaid

Registered User
Oct 18, 2010
7,941
North East England
I'm surprised that the CH didn't mention it. You can fill in the forms online I believe. I cannot manage the link yet, I haven't mastered my new I pad yet, but just google Att.All..... Make sure you fill it in for the day/night rate (higher rate) and ask the ch for input or ask AgeUk or the CAB for help.


Sent from my iPad using Talking Point
 

starryuk

Registered User
Nov 8, 2012
1,305
Yes, ask the CH to fill it in for you...Mum's CH filled in ours. They know exactly what points are relevant and everything that should be included...or should do if, like mum's CH, they have filled in many before.
 

Pickles53

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
2,474
Radcliffe on Trent
Also remember to say that your uncle has needed help from whenever he went into care home at least, or earlier if he needed support at home. You have to have needed help for 6 months before AA payment can start.
 

jenniferpa

Registered User
Jun 27, 2006
39,448
Yes indeed. The care home should help you with the forms. One thing to bear in mind, though, is that they may not have much experience with them in that many people have already got AA before they enter a home.

The whole 6 month waiting thing: it's entirely possible that if the move to the care home was precipitated by a major event (such as a stroke) he might not have been entitled to it until that event. This is basically what happened with my mother, but I was able to show that her physical issues prior to the stroke were so great that she should have been receiving AA on the basis of those physical limitations alone. TBH - I had no idea AA even existed until the stroke happened - realistically she might well have been entitled to AA at least at the lower level for a couple of years had I known it was available.
 

stuart642

Registered User
Jun 23, 2015
11
All

Many thanks for the suggestions! No one has mentioned AA or that my Uncle maybe able to claim. I have raised the forms today so we shall see!

Once again many thanks to all - very mush appreciated.

Regards

Stu