1. Expert Q&A: Benefits - Weds 23 October, 3-4pm

    Our next expert Q&A will be on the topic of benefits. It will be hosted by Lauren from our Knowledge Services team. She'll be answering your questions on Wednesday 23 October between 3-4pm.

    You can either post your question >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll be happy to ask them on your behalf.

  1. Rich p

    Rich p Registered User

    Aug 4, 2015
    17
    My wife has the relatively early stage of early onset Alzheimer's. She is capable of driving but at some point will clearly become unable to.
    Do I need to do anything to inform the DVLA now? Should she be driving at all?
     
  2. Beate

    Beate Registered User

    May 21, 2014
    11,713
    Female
    London
    Yes, you have to inform the DVLA. They can make her take annual tests but if at some point you think she is no longer able to drive you ought to tell them that too and urge her to surrender her licence. However, many people think there is nothing wrong with their driving which is why relatives had to resort to disabling the car etc.

    In our case, a car accident put paid to his driving career. The car simply didn't get fixed afterwards! I knew he would have been behind the wheel again otherwise.
     
  3. Rich p

    Rich p Registered User

    Aug 4, 2015
    17
    Thanks Beate, I'd better get onto that pronto.
     
  4. ITBookworm

    ITBookworm Registered User

    Oct 26, 2011
    453
    Glasgow
    I have the suspicion you probably need to inform whichever company insures the car as well :( From previous comments I have seen I don't think it is likely to be a problem as long as you are able to confirm to them that DVLA have also been notified. It basically means that they can't weasel out of anything if, heaven forbid, there ever is an accident.
     
  5. Chuggalug

    Chuggalug Registered User

    Mar 24, 2014
    8,007
    Norfolk
    Well spotted, ITBookworm. Yes, Rich should do that as a matter of self-protection, as well as protecting his wife. The last thing anyone would want is prosecution, or threat of prosecution by the police. Scary, I know, but get full backup protection ASAP.
     
  6. Countryboy

    Countryboy Registered User

    Mar 17, 2005
    1,425
    Male
    Cornwall
    #6 Countryboy, Aug 10, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2015
    Hi as suggested by ITBookworm you should notify the Vehicle Insurers , in majority of cases all your required to do is answer the following Questions:

    (a) have you notified DVLA
    (b) did the DVLA issued you with a 1, 2, or 3 years medical driving licence

    its a medical driving licence nothing about dementia
     
  7. Rich p

    Rich p Registered User

    Aug 4, 2015
    17
    Thanks for your help
     
  8. Early Girlie

    Early Girlie Registered User

    Jul 5, 2015
    66
    St Albans
    Here's the link to the DVLA form for Alzheimer's. https://www.gov.uk/alzheimers-disease-and-driving

    I sent it off a couple of weeks ago, and received a reply within a week saying they would write to Hubby's consultant for a recommendation. Nothing to tell me whether he can drive in the meantime, mind you. To be on the safe side, he is not driving until we hear back.

    I also notified the insurers and they were not at all bothered. Just noted it in medical conditions and sent new paperwork through. No change to the premium or anything.

    Next step, travel insurance!

    EG
     
  9. polly1

    polly1 Registered User

    Dec 8, 2011
    306
    Hampshire
    Hi EG
    Try flexicover.co.UK for your travel insurance. They insured my husband who has PCA ( rare form of Alzheimer's) on 2 occasions without any hassle.
     
  10. Countryboy

    Countryboy Registered User

    Mar 17, 2005
    1,425
    Male
    Cornwall
    #10 Countryboy, Aug 10, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2015
    What happens after you tell DVLA

    You’ll usually get a decision within 6 weeks. You’ll get a letter from DVLA if it takes longer.

    DVLA might:
    • contact your doctor or consultant
    • arrange for you to be examined
    • ask you to take a driving assessment, or an eyesight or driving test

    You can usually drive while DVLA are considering your application

    I have been down this road many many times definately wearing the "T" shirt on this subject
     
  11. Rich p

    Rich p Registered User

    Aug 4, 2015
    17
    Most helpful, thanks
     
  12. tigerqueen

    tigerqueen Registered User

    Mar 11, 2014
    75
    Essex
    Ditto everything already said, but also when my husband was at this stage he quickly advanced to not being able to work out what to do when faced with new road layouts, and if he got into the wrong lane the action he took was questionable. Also he stopped being able to find his way to places he didn't visit often. Watch out for this as it can become quite scary if you are in the car too.

    I was lucky that hubby needed to renew his licence at his 70th birthday, and the DVLA then only issued him with a one year licence (they had been informed the previous year when he was diagnosed), and during that year I offered to drive more often to the point that he accepted that it wasn't worth renewing his licence again the following year. I then told him we could always renew at a later date ( a little white lie, I know), and he accepted this without fuss and has never asked to drive again. I didn't want to have to take his licence away from him as he felt he was okay, so the fact he gave it up easily was such a relief. I hope it is as easy for you when the time comes.
     
  13. Rich p

    Rich p Registered User

    Aug 4, 2015
    17
    Just an update - I've sent the form off to the DVLA and informed the insurance company. They seemed pretty sanguine about it, at the moment, at least. My wife is still driving but I'll be interested to see what happens next re an assessment.
    I filled the form in honestly and ticked all the boxes re occasional confusion, loss of memory.
    She won't be happy if they stop her driving although I ensure she does as little as possible. Even to the extent of not drinking when we go out!
     
  14. Countryboy

    Countryboy Registered User

    Mar 17, 2005
    1,425
    Male
    Cornwall
    Hi Rich p well that depends on weather your wide has been given a diagnoses of dementia if the answer is yes it's a requirement by Law to notify DVLA , But once you tell them no going back , I fraught and battled the DVLA for 12 years and still dive after being diagnosed with Alzheimer's 16 years ago and have a full driving licence now ok this just my personal view and can only give advise on myself
     
  15. Scarlett123

    Scarlett123 Registered User

    Apr 30, 2013
    3,802
    Essex
    I know everyone has different opinions, but once John started dithering whilst driving, and not looking at junctions, I was emphatic he had to stop. This resulted in the most bitter rows, but there is no way I could have forgiven myself if he had injured someone - or worse.
     

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