1. Expert Q&A: Living well as a carer - Weds 28 August, 3-4pm

    As a carer for a person living with dementia, the needs of the person you care for will often come before your own. You may experience a range of difficult emotions and you may not have the time to do all the things you need to do. Caring can have a big impact on both your mental and physical health, as well as your overall wellbeing.

    Angelo, our Knowledge Officer (Wellbeing) is our expert on this topic. He will be here to answer your questions on Wednesday 28 August between 3-4pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

  1. Allain

    Allain New member

    Jul 2, 2019
    1
    My dad has been diagnosed with Both awful diseases he’s upset as we have taken car keys away we have heard nothing back from DVLA
    Surely insurance companies won’t insure him
    Can anyone help give us advice xxx
     
  2. Shedrech

    Shedrech Volunteer Moderator

    Dec 15, 2012
    7,738
    Yorkshire
    hello @Allain
    a warm welcome to DTP
    what a tricky issue driving is

    only you as his family know whether of not your dad is safe to be out on the road ... a diagnosis itself doesn't necessarily mean that someone has to immediately stop driving, nor that your dad couldn't be insured ... it's much more down to safety for other drivers and himself
    if you are unsure, maybe look into a driving assessment
    if you are sure, and your dad is no longer able to drive safely, you are right to have taken action and if it is an acceptable excuse to him say to him that sadly he can't be insured, which puts the 'blame' away from you and you can sympathise with him while suggesting he will save all the costs and can take taxis and buses instead

    however, given the nature of dementia, It may be that your dad will not retain or accept any explanation but will hold on to his belif that he should still be able to drive, so maybe best to keep the car out of sight and not get into discussion about it
     
  3. Palerider

    Palerider Registered User

    Aug 9, 2015
    442
    Male
    North West
    Sooner or later someone in a professional capacity will advise that he no longer drives. I informed the DVLA of mums situation as dad couldn't bring himself to do it, She was unsure at times of where she was (disorientated) which to be honest was the bigger concern -that is driving and ending up 50 miles away and lost if alone.

    It took a few years for her to get over loosing her licence. To divert attention away from me I told her that her doctor said she could no longer drive. There were moments of outrage initially, but she has since calmed and now accepts she couldn't drive even if she wanted to, though she insists on passenger seat driving -which drives me around the twist on some days.
     
  4. Izzy

    Izzy Volunteer Moderator

    Aug 31, 2003
    59,236
    Female
    Dundee
    My husband had to surrender his licence as soon as I informed the DVLA. I know of others who have undergone driving tests (yearly I think) in order to retain their licences.

    I wondered if you would find this information useful -

    Driving and Dementia.
     
  5. Countryboy

    Countryboy Registered User

    Mar 17, 2005
    1,408
    Male
    Cornwall
    I know Driving can be a controversial topic with varied views.

    but to give a little encouragement to those who maybe in the process of getting a diagnoses or may have been recently diagnosed with dementia and worried about driving

    Now at age 76 Just recently I replied again for my driving licence and I’m delighted to report I have been issued with a full 3 year Licence until 2022 good news considering this November I will be in the twentieth year of having a dementia diagnoses

    Also Insurance was never been a problem when I had a I year licence obviouslyNow I have a Full licence not an issue at all
     
  6. Palerider

    Palerider Registered User

    Aug 9, 2015
    442
    Male
    North West
    Thanks for sharing this has certainly opened my eyes in how some people with dementia can continue to live out their lives
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.