1. Q&A: Looking after yourself as a carer - Friday 25 January, 3-4pm

    As a carer for a person living with dementia, the needs of that person will often come before your own, and this can mean that you don't always look after yourself.

    However, it's important for both you and the person you care for. But how do you do that properly?

    Our next expert Q&A will be on looking after yourself as a carer. It will be hosted by Angelo from our Knowledge Services team, who focuses on wellbeing. He'll be answering your questions on Friday 25 January between 3-4pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

Don't know what to do!

Discussion in 'I have a partner with dementia' started by Kenbob, Jan 11, 2019 at 8:17 PM.

  1. Kenbob

    Kenbob New member

    Friday
    3
    my wife says she want's to go to the toilet she say's she has been but has not.
    I am worried about constipation and hold urine for too long.
     
  2. Izzy

    Izzy Volunteer Moderator

    Aug 31, 2003
    57,831
    Female
    Dundee
    Hi @Kenbob and welcome to the forum.

    I'm sorry your wife is experiencing these problems. If you're concerned about her right now it might be best to phone NHS on 111 and talk to some tonight.
     
  3. Kenbob

    Kenbob New member

    Friday
    3
    Thank you for the advice is this common with Alzheimer's sufferers?
     
  4. Izzy

    Izzy Volunteer Moderator

    Aug 31, 2003
    57,831
    Female
    Dundee
    My husband certainly suffered from urine retention and he had to be catheterised.
     
  5. chickenlady

    chickenlady Registered User

    Feb 28, 2016
    59
    Yes, constipation is common but also urine tract infection. Warm drinks aid movement within the gut. Try 111.
     
  6. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    16,835
    Male
    North Manchester
    Prolonged urine retention can be serious, ring 111 and tell them how long since urine passed
     
  7. Baggybreeks

    Baggybreeks Registered User

    Mar 22, 2017
    47
    Scotland
    Try getting her into a nice warm bath, it might start the urine flowing, worked for my son when he had a problem as a child. Good luck
     
  8. petals

    petals Registered User

    Jan 20, 2012
    16
     
  9. petals

    petals Registered User

    Jan 20, 2012
    16
    Do you think she is confused due to memory problems. Sometimes people with dementia will be convinced that they have done something when they have not. If she can be supported to visit the toilet and when she is on the toilet seat, you can run the tap fir a while which might help her use the toilet. Drinking water throughout the day might help. I am sorry I was not sure if you stated that she has dementia.
     
  10. Kenbob

    Kenbob New member

    Friday
    3
    Thankyou for the reply,no worries I should have put she has a diagnosis of probable moderate Alzheimer's
     
  11. Philbo

    Philbo Registered User

    Feb 28, 2017
    528
    Male
    Kent
    Hi @Kenbob

    My wife is mainly incontinent, which I try to manage by ensuring she goes to the toilet frequently.
    A lot of the time, she will "go" within a short time of sitting down however, there are times where she will sit there for absolute ages, without going at all.

    I have found by trial and error, that if I stand her up, then sit her back down (sometimes several times), eventually (though not always), she will then go. It's as if the "go trigger" in her brain is missing and by repeating the activity of sitting down, it eventually kicks in?

    Maybe worth a try at least?

    Good luck.
    Phil
     
  12. marionq

    marionq Registered User

    Apr 24, 2013
    5,104
    Female
    Scotland
    I had to take My husband to A & E last year with both of these issues. They found his bowel was full but not blocked. They got 2 litres of water into him and he peed copiously. They gave me a box of Laxido which is a gentle laxative in water to give him whenever he seized up.

    He has porridge and fresh fruit every morning which was always enough but with lack of mobility from dementia seems to need more help.
     

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