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Donated brains 'in short supply'

Margarita

Registered User
Feb 17, 2006
10,824
london
The quest to find new treatments for Parkinson's disease is being hampered by a lack of donated brains for study.

There is a constant need for new tissue to work on but researchers told the British Association Science Festival this tissue was in short supply.

This was slowing drug development in a vital area of medicine, they argued.

With an ever ageing population, it is predicted the incidence of both Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease is likely to go up.Dr Kirstin Goldring, manager of the UK Parkinson's Disease Society Tissue Bank at Imperial College London, said: "Many of us would consider donating our kidney or heart if we were to die suddenly, but would you consider donating your brain?

"If not, why not?"
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/4218620.stm



I never like the idea of donating mum brain, let along mind . But now I am having 2nd thoughts
 

lesmisralbles

Account Closed
Nov 23, 2007
5,543
Dear Maggie

Donating a dead brain.

If it is no use to the person that had it, and it can be of use to future generations. And to help with the cause of this dreadfull illness, well, Yes.

I have left every bit of my body, (well my liver might not be up to much, nor my lungs) but, I could restore someone's eyesight. How wonderfull would that be:)

Barb XX
 

christine_batch

Registered User
Jul 31, 2007
3,388
Buckinghamshire
When Peter was first diagnoised with AD and he wanted me to explain how the AD effects the brain.

He also asked me to make enquiries regarding donating his brain.

It is well documented with his last wishes, that his brain went to Research.

Christine
 

lesmisralbles

Account Closed
Nov 23, 2007
5,543
JPG1, thank you, But

No my heart would be worth nothing.

I have high blood pressure, I have a heart murmer, I smoke, I drink, need I go on.
Also, it is amazing how I do go on, I think it is called loving someone more than yourself. And I love my Ron, and my Mum XXX
I hope I stay alive long enough to take care of them:)

Barb X
 

lesmisralbles

Account Closed
Nov 23, 2007
5,543
Dear Christine

It is well documented with his last wishes, that his brain went to Research.

I did not know that.
I applaud you both. Thank you.

Barb X
 

connie

Registered User
Mar 7, 2004
9,519
Frinton-on-Sea
The person with the illness has to 'be of sound mind' when they sign up to donating their brain for research after death.

Christine's Peter was very thoughtful, as was my friends husband.

Wish Lionel & I had talked it through at the start of his illness, I am sure he would have liked to. Too late now - he cannot give his consent. The proceedure is far more involved than just donating normal body organs.
 

Grannie G

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 3, 2006
70,674
Kent
Dhiren carried a Donor Card for years. Now it`s one more thing he has lost.
When the time comes I will mention this to see if it carries any weight.
 

connie

Registered User
Mar 7, 2004
9,519
Frinton-on-Sea
Sylvia, in the case of brain donation it has to be set up before hand. It is a strict proceedure, whereby the designated clinic/hospital have to be the first notified, and they have to have the body within a short space of time, before you can put any other arrangements in place.

Think most of us have missed the boat, and although Lionel still has his organ donation card I know it does not cover his brain.
 

Grannie G

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 3, 2006
70,674
Kent
Now even if people do not carry donor cards, am I right in believeing the next of kin can be asked for permission to donate organs?
I understand you will have investigated this thoroughly Connie, so I am not questioning you, but it is a great shame something cannot be organized in advance by next of kin, for brain donation.
 

Skye

Registered User
Aug 29, 2006
17,000
SW Scotland
Sylvia, in the case of brain donation it has to be set up before hand. It is a strict proceedure, whereby the designated clinic/hospital have to be the first notified, and they have to have the body within a short space of time, before you can put any other arrangements in place.

That;s right, Connie. I remember that from the TV programme about the man who was dying (can't remember their names).

They had arranged brain donation, and they had to notify the research cantre when death was imminent, and there was a team waiting to harvest the brain. That would be scary, for me.

So if someone died without having arrangements in place, it would be too late to arrange brain donation, whether or not there was permission. Presumably sudden death would also mean the brain couldn't be used.

It's not surprising there's a shortage!
 

Linda Mc

Registered User
Jul 3, 2005
1,881
Nr Mold
We looked into this when Vic was first diagnosed as he wanted to help others. However at that time our nearest research centres were unable to accept donations and further afield you actually had to pay them!

We didn't pursue it further not because Vic didn't want to more that I couldn't face it.

Connie is right I seem to remember he would had to have undergo some tests now for comparison later after death.

Your post has made me want to revisit the site and read up on it again.

Linda
 

Canadian Joanne

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 8, 2005
16,317
66
Toronto, Canada
I have tried several hospitals and centres in Canada - some of them out of province - to no avail. The Canadian brain bank has closed (how pathetic and funny at the same time). So even though I want to donate Mum's brain, I can't.

I'll continue to look and check but it's really irritating to me that we can't donate.
 

Margarita

Registered User
Feb 17, 2006
10,824
london
Now even if people do not carry donor cards, am I right in believeing the next of kin can be asked for permission to donate organs?


If you’re referring to organ donor card, If does not matter that the person has lost there card as it always on their system, so all they have to do is look up the person name. I can’t see why they can’t integrate the organ donor card to also include brain donation

Same about not be able to give someone brain after death, because of not getting their permission. would of thought The brain an organ also ?
 

lesmisralbles

Account Closed
Nov 23, 2007
5,543
Is it because the brain is not an ORGAN

Wondered if this was the reason ???
Barb X
I thought, wrongly, I sopose, and some bright spark will let us know.
Organs pump, brains receive the blood that is pumped.
Barb X
I thought I would quit now, dont know enough
 
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margaret101

Registered User
Jul 17, 2008
56
clacton on sea
Brain Donor

We are under The London Hospital they asked my Bill if he would like to sign up which he did

We get letters every year asking what medication he is on

We wear given a registretion no each [ he volunteered me]

I carry the cards with me , When I put My Bill into his home

I gave them copys and they know what to do when the time comes

thers is a Doner no and a telephone no to call

let me know if you want to know anything more

love Margaret
 

connie

Registered User
Mar 7, 2004
9,519
Frinton-on-Sea
Thank you Margaret for giving us straight information.

I guess it is because the brain is used for research, rather than an organ for donor transplant.

You say Bill volunteered you :) - I suppose they need a certain number of 'normal' brains for comparasion tests for data research.