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Do we need a doc assessment (dementia) to get financial help?

Toopie28

Registered User
Jun 7, 2022
31
0
I've been researching and no idea which direction to go in.

I'm looking for care for my mum (maybe live in at some point), mostly visiting several times a day (3) then upping to overnight stay.

The reason is the key situation (those keys!). She hides them and then panics as she can't get out in the morning and "the man" or "SIL" broke in and moved them (honestly, I am thinking of just going with thumb locks all over the house - that will be my next question)

Anyway, Mum's in Scotland and the overnight care is going to cost 7000 pounds a month.
OMG!!! I will be bankrupt in 3 months!
She is being assessed next month (although she doesn't know and thinks it's a routine visit - but she's gotten so bad I'm pulling out the POA card) and the the doctor will put an appointment for the memory clinic.

After the memory clinic assess her, am I able to get some financial help with carer's?
Or do I need to get SS to come in, I'm not sure.

Thanks!
 

Violet Jane

Registered User
Aug 23, 2021
885
0
I believe that the rules in Scotland are different to England's. In England SS carry out a needs assessment and then a financial assessment as social care is means tested. Generally, SS will not fund overnight care or live-in care (although these options are available to self-funders). If four care visits a day are not sufficient then SS will require the PWD to move into a care home. Visiting carers will not usually visit after about 8pm and, as far as I am aware, they will not make visits during the night to check up on a PWD.
 

Shedrech

Volunteer Moderator
Dec 15, 2012
12,448
0
Yorkshire
Hi @Toopie28
This may help with how things are organised in Scotland

Just a bit concerned that you write YOU will be bankrupt ... all fees for your mum's care should be paid from her finances, not yours
 

Toopie28

Registered User
Jun 7, 2022
31
0
Hi @Toopie28
This may help with how things are organised in Scotland

Just a bit concerned that you write YOU will be bankrupt ... all fees for your mum's care should be paid from her finances, not yours
Oh thank you. I'll look into that.

Yes, mum has some savings but that will run out quickly (maybe a year?). The cost of private care is ridiculously high.

I've kind of figured out that between her savings and mine I can get her home care for the next year and 1/2?
After that (maybe before), a care home (I'll be visiting some whilst I'm home to be prepared - caring from overseas right now).
She's 90 and a strong as an ox (mid level dementia... not sure, we'll see what docs say) .

I'm kind of on my own when it comes to financially taking care of her.

My brother is very hands off and thinks we should get government help as opposed to using her money (which she was leaving to us in her will - and brother dearest doesn't want to miss out on that!).

Going to a lawyer to be co-signer on that savings account next week.

Thanks for all responses.
 

Sarasa

Volunteer Host
Apr 13, 2018
5,010
0
Nottinghamshire
@Toopie28 , I think I'd be very careful about using your own finances to help your mother. It might not help her a great deal, and could make thing tricky for you further down the line. Your brother is in the land of wishful thinking if he imagines he can save her money for his inheritance. The only way that would happen would be if one of you (probably you) steps in to care for her.
I would cut to the chase and find her a care home. I don't know how things work in Scotland but in England you would probably need to work with social services to find a home that will pick up the tab when her savings start to diminish. While looking for my mother and my mother in law last year several homes said that although their fees for self-funded residents were higher than social services would accept, if someone had been in their home a couple of years and the saving ran out they would accept the social services basic rate, rather than asking the person with dementia to move.
 

Hours Away

Registered User
Jul 16, 2021
28
0
Personal care (which covers help with personal hygiene, meals and medication) is free in Scotland, unlike in England, paid for by local authority adult social care. You don't need a dementia diagnosis to get it so you could contact them for an assessment pre diagnosis. If you need to organise more hours of care than they deem you to need then you may be able to arrange a "direct payment" from them towards any private care that you organise and your mother funds herself. I think the maximum weekly payment is ~£200/week.
This contribution still continues if the PWD later becomes self funding in a care home although Attendance Allowance can then no longer be claimed. Whilst they are still at home I believe both payments can be received.
 

Mumsmum

Registered User
Oct 29, 2012
57
0
Scotland
Hi, I’m in Edinburgh and we supported mum with care at home for quite a few years, then she moved into a care home just before lockdown which was such a relief. Where are you based? I could give very specific advice if you are Edinburgh and more general advice if you are not.
 

Mumsmum

Registered User
Oct 29, 2012
57
0
Scotland
I agree with the other replies, it’s not your responsibility at all to pay for your mum’s care. We had free council carers assigned three times a day to give tablets and feed mum, they were lovely and never had any issues. We then found day care, one at a church, and one a community centre and managed to get mum to these 3 times a week, only about £10-20 a session. I claimed carers allowance as we cared for her enough to get that. Mum claimed attendance allowance which we used for a private befrender which wasn’t cheap, about £70 for the day but who was very reliable and could be increased to cover holidays etc. When it became obvious mum couldn’t live independently any more, locking herself out, going out inappropriately dressed etc I looked at care homes. I found a local one the cost of which is covered by mum’s pensions and renting out her small flat, but the home will take council rates so it’s not a worry. Look around at care homes, the prices vary so much, big chains can be £1500-£2000pw more than we pay. The Carehome near me has balconies, pitch and put, internet, gardens etc, but I’ve never seen anyone use anything as most people arriving in dementia care homes are past being able to do these things. Mum’s home is tiny, but friendly, in the countryside so they do go out for walks or in the wheelchairs as it’s safe and easy.
 

Toopie28

Registered User
Jun 7, 2022
31
0
Hi, I’m in Edinburgh and we supported mum with care at home for quite a few years, then she moved into a care home just before lockdown which was such a relief. Where are you based? I could give very specific advice if you are Edinburgh and more general advice if you are not.
We're in Glasgow, nearer to East Kilbride.
Thank you so much!
 

Toopie28

Registered User
Jun 7, 2022
31
0
Thanks all for your replies.
I never knew that you could have personal care without paying.

And daycare sounds like a dream. I was actually going to look into that too - under the guise that she's volunteering.
She's so lonely (which is understandable) and the days are long.
 

Tonyjoe

New member
May 31, 2022
7
0
When my wife applied for DLA we had to send a signed letter from our Doctor as evidence of her illness
 

Mumsmum

Registered User
Oct 29, 2012
57
0
Scotland
We're in Glasgow, nearer to East Kilbride.
Thank you so much!
https://www.southlanarkshire.gov.uk...nd_health/815/contacting_social_work_services gives you details on how to contact social work, go through the adult services to see what they can offer. Speak to your gp about getting care. We had a lovely social worker come and assess mum then put the care in place. If you Google dementia day care East Kilbride you’ll get lots of links, but the one worth contacting first will be the support group. Alzheimer’s Scotland are also a useful contact. Basically ring up and ask what your mum and you are entitled to and how do you get it. Don’t be scared to chase up responses. Everyone is busy so things get overlooked, chafing helps get you answers quicker.
 

DreamsAreReal

Registered User
Oct 17, 2015
425
0
The reason is the key situation (those keys!). She hides them and then panics as she can't get out in the morning and "the man" or "SIL" broke in and moved them (honestly, I am thinking of just going with thumb locks all over the house - that will be my next question)
On the subject of keys. Mum would regularly lose them and then panic that she'd be trapped in a fire or worried that someone had taken the keys and would get in at night. She was actually just hiding them, then forgetting. We had numerous new ones cut that all disappeared and a beeping key fob with a remote control that was removed and destroyed by her. We finally found something that worked. It was her idea but we put the key on a cord that she wore around her neck. Sounds simple, but she was delighted with it and never lost her key again. Worth a try.