1. Expert Q&A: Benefits - Weds 23 October, 3-4pm

    Our next expert Q&A will be on the topic of benefits. It will be hosted by Lauren from our Knowledge Services team. She'll be answering your questions on Wednesday 23 October between 3-4pm.

    You can either post your question >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll be happy to ask them on your behalf.

  1. Bernadette2

    Bernadette2 Registered User

    Mar 13, 2015
    27
    Went to visit a day centre today and I was asked if we have a dnr order. Is this something I should be contemplating? Should we do it as part of a living will? Is it necessary when my brothers and I have POA?
     
  2. Pete R

    Pete R Registered User

    Jul 26, 2014
    2,046
    Staffs
    Yes it should be considered and discussed with "official" places a relative visits. When things go bad they happen very quickly and there is not always time to contact those legally responsible for their thoughts.

    Make your relatives/your wishes known to whoever has to make an on the spot decision.

    I do hope it never comes to that .:)
     
  3. Bernadette2

    Bernadette2 Registered User

    Mar 13, 2015
    27
    Thank you so much for answering Pete
    I'm guessing that it is not enough to verbally make "our" wishes known and we should get it in writing for official places? I was just a bit taken aback when she mentioned it - first time I had been asked...
     
  4. 99purdy

    99purdy Registered User

    Oct 31, 2014
    129
    Hi Bernadette2, I too have a dilemma. My dear Mum in Law passed, very peacefully, earlier in the week. Mum in Law had a dnr in place from her recent stay in hospital. When Mum in Law was on the end of life plan I had a discussion with the Care Home and the District Nurse. They checked her file with regards to the Dnr. We knew one had been put on her records at hospital due to her frail state. She was in heart failure and we did not want them pounding her chest etc if her heart stopped, we thought it would be too invasive. What I had not realised was that if you are not given an indefinite Dnr it can 'run out' after 3 months and your GP needs to re issue. Herein is where we have a problem. My dear Step Dad had a Dnr issued when he was last in hospital approx 3 months ago. Does anybody know whether we need to get his GP to reissue this Dnr. Stepdad is in an EMI unit not a happy soul at present, his health has deteriorated and his quality of life is not very good. Other family members are in agreement. I am his next of kin and COP deputy and they have requested that I ask to make sure the Dnr is till in place. I feel quite uncomfortable in asking about this. At hospital I was asked about this Dnr by the consultant who said it was in Dad's best interest. I agreed as I was agreeing with the Doctor and backed his decision based on medical grounds. I totally agree that it would be too invasive for him considering his poor health but I cannot bring myself to have this discussion. I suppose I would like the Doctor to tell me this is what would be best for Dad. If I do not have the discussion and the Dnr does not stand then he could be subject to quite serious chest pounding which can be very brutal. Has any body had any experiences as your opinions would be greatly appreciated.
     
  5. its a struggle

    its a struggle Registered User

    Not so simple it would seem

    My recent experience of DNR in our local health authority is somewhat less than reassuring. Far from other's shocking discoveries that medical staff have issued the form at the drop of a hat, poor MIL has had to ask repeatedly for the doctor to sanction & sign.:(. She was adamant after she saw Dad being 'worked on' by paramedics 5 years ago that it was not for her.

    As she has Mild Cognitive impairment ( with some pretty awful episodes of confusion etc) we took the advice and made a living will with a clear DNR statement, duly lodged wherever at the beginning of September. Also noted on POA signed & registered 4 yrs ago.

    However, when MIL had 3 falls in a week recently, resulting in two 999 calls paramedics told us they could only DNR if there was a 'purple form' in place & that was only issued by a doctor :confused:. Dr in A&E was going to do it, Dr on the assessment unit was going to do it - finally the Doctor on the rehab ward where MIL has spent the last 16 days has signed one after grilling her about why she did not want to be resuscitated.

    All health professionals are adamant she has capacity - so why the blooming circus which has distressed her no end:mad:?
     
  6. Pete R

    Pete R Registered User

    Jul 26, 2014
    2,046
    Staffs
    Yes it can be a bit of a shock if not expected.:eek:The GP brought it up last year and when explained it is quite a sensible idea and needs discussing with all relatives and not only those with PoA.

    Verbally can be enough if you are there at the time it is needed however it should be noted on health records at Day Centres.

    If you have a strong opinion either way then it is probably best to make those known to whoever you think should be aware. Otherwise just deal with it when asked.
    :)
     

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