1. Expert Q&A: Living well as a carer - Thurs 29 August, 3-4pm

    As a carer for a person living with dementia, the needs of the person you care for will often come before your own. You may experience a range of difficult emotions and you may not have the time to do all the things you need to do. Caring can have a big impact on both your mental and physical health, as well as your overall wellbeing.

    Angelo, our Knowledge Officer (Wellbeing) is our expert on this topic. He will be here to answer your questions on Thursday 29 August between 3-4pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

  1. Brumsteve

    Brumsteve Registered User

    Feb 12, 2019
    17
    I'm just looking for some advice about DNR's.

    My mother has always said she never wants to be kept alive or resuscitated if there was no hope for her to live a good quality life. I think sometime in the past she has had a DNR when she was admitted to hospital possibly for an operation but we don't know if it still on her medical records or not. Now she has been diagnosed with dementia my sister and I are wondering if it is possible to have a DNR put in place? We don't think that my mom has the capacity to make such a decision now, she was diagnosed with Alzheimers and vascular dementia in February and seems to be on the decline rapidly.

    Could someone advise us if it's possible to have a DNR put in place by my sister and me and does anyone know how to go about? We know that this is something my mother would want.
     
  2. Banjomansmate

    Banjomansmate Registered User

    Jan 13, 2019
    976
    Female
    Dorset
    There is such a thing as an Advance Directive but whether your Mother’s dementia would be considered too advanced to allow her to make one is debatable.
    https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/end-of-life-care/advance-decision-to-refuse-treatment/

    Her GP could discuss the DNAR with her, which is a different thing and it would be in her medical records. Do you have Lasting Power of Attorney for Health & Welfare, which would allow you to talk to the GP about this?
     
  3. Brumsteve

    Brumsteve Registered User

    Feb 12, 2019
    17
    Hi there,

    Sorry forgot to mention we have both LPA's in place
     
  4. Sirena

    Sirena Registered User

    Feb 27, 2018
    1,414
    Female
    My mother is in a care home, and soon after she arrived the manager asked me about a DNR. I agreed it was a good idea, and the manager then contacted the GP to confirm it. She said the GP might want to call me and discuss it, but actually he never did. So in your case, I'd go direct to her GP, your mother can't make the decision but you can do it on her behalf.
     
  5. LynneMcV

    LynneMcV Volunteer Moderator

    May 9, 2012
    3,456
    south-east London
    In my husband's case the DNR was actually raised with me by the consultant. I agreed to it, but a few months later it became apparent that it had to be set up for every hospital and institution he was treated in during the five months leading up to his death. in fact, there were four or five DNRs in place at one time.

    it sounds convoluted, but there was never actually a problem with it. The lead medical person would always instigate the conversation about the DNR with me as soon as my husband came under their care.

    It's worth talking to the GP as you have LPA, but the conversation will still need to be had with each hospital, care home etc along the way.
     
  6. Brumsteve

    Brumsteve Registered User

    Feb 12, 2019
    17
    Thank you all for the advice. I'll (try) to sort it out with her GP but as we all know it's easier said than done getting to see them.
     
  7. Banjomansmate

    Banjomansmate Registered User

    Jan 13, 2019
    976
    Female
    Dorset
    I have been told that if a person is living at home and a DNAR is in place that you need to have a note about it easily visible in the hallway or entrance area to the house so that ambulance personnel can see it when they arrive, otherwise they will automatically go ahead with resuscitation if necessary..
     
  8. Sam Luvit

    Sam Luvit Registered User

    Oct 19, 2016
    5,472
    East Sussex
    My mum had a DNAR, it was in the front of her care plan. We were told to take it to the hospital if she was admitted. Apparently we should have carried it with us at all times, it being on her person so it could be found

    If a DNAR has been issued previously, at the hospital where she had an operation there should be a record and they should have sent a copy home with her. You could contact that hospital and ask them to provide it, or if lost, arrange for another to be issued

    That’s the theory. The hospital lost mums, but there was a record in her notes that it had been done, so they issued another.
     
  9. RosettaT

    RosettaT Registered User

    Sep 9, 2018
    196
    Female
    Mid Lincs
    #9 RosettaT, Jul 18, 2019
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2019
    My OH DNR, was dicussed between me, OH and our practice mental health nurse when he was first diagnosed (I have LPA) and it was he who agreed to it which I knew he would as he had always made his thoughts clear in the past.. When he was admitted to hospital with a very serious infection it was easy for me to tell the consultant OHs wishes and it was duly raised. I have it in his folder at home and it is on his medical records, although like above, the first 'went missing' and a second had to be raised.
     
  10. Jaded'n'faded

    Jaded'n'faded Registered User

    Jan 23, 2019
    387
    Female
    High Peak
    They do go missing and no one talks to each other. Last time mum was taken to hospital I was asked about DNAR and queried it, saying it should be on her records from the previous visit. No, it wasn't and I was also told that, 'That would only apply to the previous occasion - we need a new one now.'

    I spoke with her GP at a later date and mum now has a 'permanent' DNAR on her records and CH care notes. (It also states 'no hospital' and that the CH is mum's preferred place to die.) However, paramedics sometimes overlook care notes, don't consult the GP or check any other records when they turn up so I now carry a copy of mum's Advance Directive in my handbag. :rolleyes: o_O
     

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