Diagnosis in late 50s, can anyone relate?

Discussion in 'Memory concerns and seeking a diagnosis' started by Angelah18, Mar 13, 2019.

  1. Angelah18

    Angelah18 New member

    Feb 14, 2019
    5
    Have posted a few times before.
    My mum is 58 & has had memory problems for over 6 months which became worse in November after being hospitalised with ? Stroke that was ruled out. She is due to see neurology again next week after seeing one in January who was quite honestly a waste of time. Mri showed some issues but not related to a stroke or dementia so far. My mum has issues with word assiciation, remembering day to day tasks & errands but most recently she will continually talk about the past & become extremely upset saying she wants her mum & dad (both deceased), she was convinced that a dream she had was real & became very upset about the situation in this dream, she believed it had truly happened & it took a lot of convincing to make her see that it wasn't real. She also suffers from a tremor which can be really bad some days. I'm just really looking to see if anyone can relate & if anyone is caring or seeking diagnosis of someone of a similar age & what their symptoms were like.
     
  2. chickenlady

    chickenlady Registered User

    Feb 28, 2016
    94
    Ask her GP for a second opinion, point out the tremor as there is a distinct relation between parkinson's and dementia. At the end of the day the diagnosis doesn't change much, it's your ability to come to terms with symptoms and behaviours that matters most. Find a local dementia group and seek peer support from people in similar situations.
     
  3. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    9,867
    Female
    South coast
    Im glad she is seeing another neurologist. Some of those symptoms sound very suspicious - especially the tremor, the vivid dream and wanting her deceased parents. make sure the neurologist knows about them. If you dont think you will be able to talk about them in front of your mum then write a letter and hand it discretely to the receptionist or one of the nurses before you go in.
     

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