1. Andrea123

    Andrea123 New member

    Jul 5, 2019
    1
    Hi, my mum has recently been diagnosed and declared incapable of making decisions. We're now starting to look into deputyship. I want to be involved as much as I can but live abroad, so being physically present to sign paperwork etc isn't an option for me. Does anyone know if things can be done electronically these days? Or if I'm appointed as co deputy with someone else would that work? Any info or advice would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. Shedrech

    Shedrech Volunteer Moderator

    Dec 15, 2012
    7,935
    Yorkshire
    hello @Andrea123
    a warm welcome to DTP
    a tough time for you and your mum, not easy at all for you being at a distance

    I wonder whether some of the info on the main AS site may be useful
    https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/search?keywords=deputy&Search=

    and there's the Gov site too
    https://www.gov.uk/become-deputy/apply-deputy

    just to ask, are you sure that your mum no longer has capacity at all, a diagnosis doesn't necessarily mean that the person doesn't have capacity enough to make decisions, even if they need help in implementing them ... if there's any chznce to put in place LPAs that will be more straight forward for all concerned
    https://www.gov.uk/power-of-attorney
     
  3. nae sporran

    nae sporran Volunteer Host

    Oct 29, 2014
    5,823
    Male
    Bristol
  4. Delphie

    Delphie Registered User

    Dec 14, 2011
    1,252
    Most things can be done electronically, as far as I know there can be more than one Deputy, and one OPG visitor I chatted to at some length a few years ago told me of a Deputy who does the 'job' from Australia and others who live abroad so the system certainly accommodates such circumstances.

    A new-ish thing that now appears on the online annual reports us Deputies submit is a question around safeguarding - how often do you see the person, what arrangements are there to make sure they're well looked after etc., so even if you can't visit often you're expected to keep an eye from afar, which is just as it should be.

    So it's definitely possible to do things remotely. To be honest, I can't imagine that many panel Deputies (people the Court of Protection appoints if there's no family or friends to step into the role) do much in person. They tend to be professional people, like solicitors, and have a 'day job'.
     

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