Dentist - Oral Health

CraigC

Registered User
Mar 21, 2003
6,630
London
Hi All,

Not sure how many get the Living with Dementia magazine, but there was an article on Coping With Oral Neglect. Brilliant helpful article and reminder. Just as a follow up, I'm not sure, but think dad has some discomfort with his mouth / teeth at the moment, it is just so hard to tell exactly what is wrong. They have a dentist that visits the home so will chase it up, but I wondered if any of you had and practical experience of someone with dementia having tooth ache and how treatement progressed.

Dad had a filling a few years ago and he was fine BUT as his dementia has progressed I'm just not sure how he or the dentist will cope. Obviously this is something we will discuss, but just wondered if any of you could part with advice.

By the way, you can view the article via the site at:
http://www.alzheimers.org.uk/site/scripts/documents.php?categoryID=200241

It is in the Feb 2008 copy.

Thanks
Craig
 

connie

Registered User
Mar 7, 2004
9,519
Frinton-on-Sea
Saw the article Craig, and highlighted the page when I left it for the staff to read.

Unfortunately Lionel, even when in pain, will just not open his mouth to let you anywhere near. I have had the dentist attend him in the home, but she could not do anything at all.

I dread an abscess forming or some such, do not know what we will be able to do. Indeed today he had blood coming from his mouth when we finished changing him this afternoon. We think he bit his lip. No way was he going to let any one of us look in his mouth.

Its times like this I realise all the helpful articles in the world cannot help my dear man.
 

Canadian Joanne

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 8, 2005
16,243
65
Toronto, Canada
Hi Craig,
There is a dental team that goes into my mother's home twice a year. They have managed to clean her teeth every time so far. But she requires daily oral hygiene and I don't think she's getting it regularly. Granted, my mother is difficult. I have stopped brushing her teeth as it got too hard for me to do. But if I had the proper swabs or whatever tool is required, I would give it another bash.

I go on my mother's breath - sometimes it is so horrible it would knock a buzzard off its perch at 150 yards. But what to do??:confused:
 

elaineo2

Registered User
Jul 6, 2007
945
leigh lancashire
hi Craig,is dad eating well or at all?just asking because i have encountered this before and residents eventually admit their mouth is sore.not eating can be a good indication of mouth sores.just a thought.love elainex
 

christine_batch

Registered User
Jul 31, 2007
3,388
Buckinghamshire
Hi Craig,
When I chose the C.H. for Peter, they had Dentist, Optician, someone to check his feet, hairdresser.
As the relevent people came to check Peter and this is when he called talk, he told them to clear off.
So now he has lost his upper and lower dentures, when I kept replacing his glasses he would break them.
So what started off as good intentions, Peter will not have any of it.
So on a good day then he will let them do anything, at the end of the days I feel sorry for the Staff.
Christine
 

CraigC

Registered User
Mar 21, 2003
6,630
London
Thanks for all the tips and insight. I'm going to speak to the care home manager, but still a bit concerned how they are going to deal with dad if there is a problem. Brushing his teeth is an experience in itself. He had a high tolerance for pain but alzheimer's seems to sear the pain nerves in the brain as his reaction to pain is all over the place. This makes diagnosing or treating any physical problem so difficult.

hi Craig,is dad eating well or at all?
elaine, he is eating OK, I just noticed the general decline in his front teeth and he is wincing a bit when I fed him chocolate the other day. Just hard to tell and I hate playing dentist or doctors.

The care home are brilliant at dealing with issues like this so have confidence in them if I give a nudge. Sometime I think that perhaps I do a little too much nudging :eek: but they are getting used to me now ;)

Again thank you all and good luck with all your dental challenges! That reminds me I need to book an apicectomy appointment for myself - makes me sick thinking about it - hate the dentist!

Kindest Regards
Craig
 

barraf

Registered User
Mar 27, 2004
308
Huddersfield
Dentist

Hello Craig
After a lot of pushing I got Margaret onto the hospital dental unit list. They have more experience of dealing with difficult patients than an ordinary dental practice. She has one appointment per year, (They will do house calls) and of course we have a number to ring in emergency.

They have supplied me with specialy strong fluoride toothpaste available only on prescription. Also a plastic wedge to put between her teeth at one side of her mouth while you clean one side, and then you can swop over to do the other side. I don't often need it, but it is there if required.

It may not be the perfect solution but it is a lot better than nothing.

Cheers Barraf
 

SmogTheCat

Registered User
Sep 1, 2005
45
Italy
Antonietta used false teeth.
Some months ago, nurses of the nursing home where she lived, considering her false teeth became too large, decided to keep it away and left Antonietta without false teeth.
A month ago, when we moved her to a new nursing home, doctor asked to us why Antonietta hasn't any false teeth.
After we told him the story, he told us there is a dentist who visits nursing home once a month and if we want, he could visit Antonietta.
We don't know how Antonietta could react (I think she doesn't remember how is a dentist) but we can try.
I'll post more info as soon as she will be viisted.
 

connie

Registered User
Mar 7, 2004
9,519
Frinton-on-Sea
Hi smog.,ciao, ..so good to hear from you...it has been a while.

So glad that you are using info. gathered from TP.

Hope Antionette profits from the next dental visit.
Please stay in touch.

Arrivederderci
 

SmogTheCat

Registered User
Sep 1, 2005
45
Italy
Dentist visited Antonietta but he said her false theeth are too old. Considering she is able to eat without false theeth, we decided to do not take any actions.
 

christine_batch

Registered User
Jul 31, 2007
3,388
Buckinghamshire
I too read the article. Very good information but to put it into practice is another thing.

On Peter's Care Plan last week it was written up about oral hygiene. Peter will not wear his dentures, go near him with a toothbrush and he is so aggitated.

Optician has been in and Peter also backed away. So after 5 pairs of glasses, no dentures and as he no longer recognises me, so even I cannot cleans (what teeth he has left), nor give him a shave.

Thank God the Staff are brillaint and they are the ones trying to carry out the Care Plan because I know now I would not be able to.

Christine
 

hendy

Registered User
Feb 20, 2008
506
West Yorkshire
Hi Craig
I will read the article with interest. Just to add something to your post. My dad has been on the ward for four weeks now and his teeth are being cared for properly. I'm shocked that I thought he wasn't cooperating with oral hygiene routines in the NH. I'm now thinking it may have been just neglect. (Getting cross again!) Yet another example of it... I think its good that you have brought the issue up for discussion. Good basic nursing care can improve quality of life for dementia suffers.
kind regards
hendy
 

Margaret W

Registered User
Apr 28, 2007
3,725
North Derbyshire
Your posts are all fascinating, cos mum's top and bottom partial dentures have both gone missing in the last 6 months. Cost £800 last Spring. Mum now doesn't even remember having any, tells me she has got them in! There is no visiting dentist at the home, and no local dentist to do home visits, and no NHS dentist with spaces on their list.

Having just been told that mum's pension credit was awarded in error, she is £50 a week less well off, and has to repay £1,500, I think she will be toothless for the rest of her life.

Regards

Margaret