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Dementia in the news today.

Pepp3r

Registered User
May 22, 2020
88
0
I read a news headline today about Dementia cases rising in the future. It mentioned a report about some lifestyle changes which could help in the fight against developing Dementia. I feel disheartened knowing my mum ticked all these boxes and still developed Alzheimers..... I worry about what to do for my own wellbeing and future .
 

jennifer1967

Registered User
Mar 15, 2020
7,932
0
Southampton
they were talking about diabetes, obesity and smoking but most of those are risk factors for vascular dementia, smoking, diet, could change but they also stated that people are living longer into older age so the increase numbers of those who get dementia would increase as well. im afraid i believe in fate and what will be. i could develop anything or run over by a bus. they say about stimulating the brain.
 

Roman223

Registered User
Dec 29, 2020
118
0
I read a news headline today about Dementia cases rising in the future. It mentioned a report about some lifestyle changes which could help in the fight against developing Dementia. I feel disheartened knowing my mum ticked all these boxes and still developed Alzheimers..... I worry about what to do for my own wellbeing and future .
 

Roman223

Registered User
Dec 29, 2020
118
0
Pepp3r I have just read your post and am curious I did not see this report! Could you name some of the lifestyle changes?
 

jennifer1967

Registered User
Mar 15, 2020
7,932
0
Southampton
Pepp3r I have just read your post and am curious I did not see this report! Could you name some of the lifestyle changes?
it was smoking, obesity, diabetes they think could be linked. but also as the population are living longer, then the numbers would grow accordingly
 

Jaded'n'faded

Registered User
Jan 23, 2019
2,420
0
High Peak
I saw this article and was horrified that, yet again, there were suggestions that dementia can be prevented if you just do this and that. The underlying conclusion is also that if you do get dementia it's your own fault.

I'm sick of this. We all know people who have lived very healthy lifestyles, done everything 'right', but still get dementia. Equally, there are plenty of overweight smokers who don't get dementia.

All we really know about the 'healthy diet and lifestyle' is that you stand a good chance of living a few years longer. But we also know that the greatest risk for dementia is being very old. If you look at the incidence of dementia through the ages, the rate increases dramatically as you get older, particularly for women. At 95, your chances of having dementia (if female) are about 45%. Now, unless all the really old people are taking up smoking and junk food, the reason for getting it clearly isn't lifestyle!

As the incidence is far higher in women than in men, I think it's time the scientists looked more at that aspect as it might offer some clues - a hormone connection maybe?

 

Tilly13

Registered User
Jul 27, 2020
46
0
Totally agree @Jaded'n'faded
I don't feel that my parents lifestyle meant Dementia was coming .
I remember 20+ years ago my husband being very upset at continual reports regarding cancer - sadly both his parents died in their 60s of cancer and neither of their lifestyles linked to it .
 

marionq

Registered User
Apr 24, 2013
6,451
0
Scotland
Even more annoying is that Alzheimer’s is the main illness at 70% of all dementias. The remaining 30% is made of vascular dementia, Lewy Body, Korsakoff and a host of other dementias.

Alzheimer’s is the one most likely to be linked to genetics and so all the healthy living in the world won’t stop it. My husband never smoked, drank modestly, slim and active, learned several languages, very healthy diet. But …. His father and grandfather and several brothers all developed Alzheimer’s. Nothing in his life caused it except the family he was born into.
 

Sarasa

Volunteer Host
Apr 13, 2018
4,179
0
This is the link to one of the news articles about the rise in Dementia in case people want to explore further.
I found the course run by the Wicking Dementia Centre at the University of Tasmania really useful at understanding the various risk factors involved. I see they now have a new course on Traumatic Brain Injury that might also be of interest.
 

jennifer1967

Registered User
Mar 15, 2020
7,932
0
Southampton
vascular dementia it is suggested could be caused by lifestyle in that its the narrowing of the blood vessels which limit oxygen which then causes brain damage. smoking, high blood pressure, unhealthy diet, lack of exercise and to some extent diabetes because diabetes can have vascular problems due to insufficient circulation and neuropathy. i suppose the way the arteries in the heart can block or narrow. tias and strokes which can lead to it as in my husbands case seem to be linked that way too
 

imthedaughter

Registered User
Apr 3, 2019
705
0
vascular dementia it is suggested could be caused by lifestyle in that its the narrowing of the blood vessels which limit oxygen which then causes brain damage. smoking, high blood pressure, unhealthy diet, lack of exercise and to some extent diabetes because diabetes can have vascular problems due to insufficient circulation and neuropathy. i suppose the way the arteries in the heart can block or narrow. tias and strokes which can lead to it as in my husbands case seem to be linked that way too
Lifestyle isn't everything... My dad was diagnosed with vascular dementia despite a long-term vegetarian (and healthy) diet, never overweight, never smoked, never had high blood pressure, exercised daily - even after his accident which left him disabled he swam every day - even his supposed diabetes was misdiagnosed by an over-enthusiastic Dr. His brain shows signs of stroke/tia but he's never been caught having one, so it's not a classic case. I do think though he could have paid more attention to vitamins he was lacking, and he definitely had circulation problems in his leg, but I'm not sure if they contributed. Dr says it's not genetic either but I agree with @Jaded'n'faded - frankly the media prey on people's fears and will tell you anything - chocolate, no chocolate, red wine, no red wine, tea, coffee, mediterranean diet, keto, whatever, prevents or doesn't prevent dementia. This kind of 'it's your fault if you get X' is not helpful at all.
 

lollyc

Registered User
Sep 9, 2020
673
0
I saw this article and was horrified that, yet again, there were suggestions that dementia can be prevented if you just do this and that. The underlying conclusion is also that if you do get dementia it's your own fault.

I'm sick of this. We all know people who have lived very healthy lifestyles, done everything 'right', but still get dementia. Equally, there are plenty of overweight smokers who don't get dementia.

All we really know about the 'healthy diet and lifestyle' is that you stand a good chance of living a few years longer. But we also know that the greatest risk for dementia is being very old. If you look at the incidence of dementia through the ages, the rate increases dramatically as you get older, particularly for women. At 95, your chances of having dementia (if female) are about 45%. Now, unless all the really old people are taking up smoking and junk food, the reason for getting it clearly isn't lifestyle!

As the incidence is far higher in women than in men, I think it's time the scientists looked more at that aspect as it might offer some clues - a hormone connection maybe?

This really upsets me.

My Mum did all the "right" things, and still got dementia. It was most certainly not her fault. She didn't have Alzheimer's and her scans were inconclusive, so we don't even know what flavour she did have. If we can't even identify which variety a PWD is suffering from, how we can we possibly know what may / may not be contributing factors?

What I do believe is that delirium brought on her dementia (I know that's not the accepted view, but she was fine before this) and I would like to see this properly diagnosed and managed. And I agree that more research into the role of hormones - or lack of them - would be far more useful .