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'Dementia from the inside' SCIE video

Nessa456

Registered User
Nov 19, 2004
131
West Midlands
I just came across this interesting video produced by SCIE - the Social Care Institute for Excellence, via a twitter link

It gives an impression of what life is like for a person with Dementia from their own point of view

http://www.scie.org.uk/socialcaretv/video-player.asp?v=dementia-from-the-inside

"What is the video about?

In this film we find out what it might feel like to live with dementia. Viewers will experience a little of what it is like to find yourself in a world that seems familiar and yet doesn’t always make sense. The incidents pictured in this film and memories recounted are based upon true experiences gathered from people living with dementia


Messages for practice

People with dementia:

May interpret things that happen differently to those around them

May have unanticipated periods of lucidity and periods of confusion alike

May sometimes not recognise people or places they know well

May become frustrated with themselves or those who struggle to understand them

May not be able to articulate or communicate their anxieties, fears or frustrations

Live with unpredictability, such as the passage of time

Who will find this useful?

Care staff, social workers, care managers, managers, registered managers, carers, community nurses, nursing staff, occupational therapists, people with dementia, people who use services, employers, trainers, families, friends and neighbours."


I was interested most in the section where the lady sees the letters of the shop sign fall off and wondered how frequent an experience this is among people with dementia - it seemed unusual to me

We don't know that all the things a person with dementia experiences are due specifically to the dementia do we?
 

CollegeGirl

Registered User
Jan 19, 2011
9,524
North East England
I found that very interesting, Nessa, thanks for posting the link.

I went on a dyslexia awareness course through work and letters 'falling off' can also be experienced by people suffering from that, too. It must be very difficult to cope with something like that happening.

Being unaware of the passage of time and forgetting what you've done in that time must also be terrifying, along with the inability to say what you want to say, or thinking you're saying one thing when in reality you're saying another. My dad has learned that when mam says 'teapot' she means the toilet.
 

Nessa456

Registered User
Nov 19, 2004
131
West Midlands
I found that very interesting, Nessa, thanks for posting the link.

I went on a dyslexia awareness course through work and letters 'falling off' can also be experienced by people suffering from that, too. It must be very difficult to cope with something like that happening.

Being unaware of the passage of time and forgetting what you've done in that time must also be terrifying, along with the inability to say what you want to say, or thinking you're saying one thing when in reality you're saying another. My dad has learned that when mam says 'teapot' she means the toilet.

Thanks, yes, it was very interesting

What peaked my interest was that she also says that she met her partner at the Isle of Wight Festival - this then led me to consider that perhaps hallucinogenic drugs had been taken at this festival, such as LSD, which were more to blame for her hallucinations than the actual dementia

I know the video was a composite of various peoples' experiences but the same person who attended the festival could have been the one seeing the falling letters.

Also, when the lady said 'slipper' instead of 'supper' - I do stuff like this all the time!
I'm 50 this year and I have noticed that I often say completely the wrong word in sentences - I think it's called aphasia and it can be a risk sign for future dementia. My Father has mid to early late stage Alzheimers and is in a care home and his late mother also had Alzheimers so I see myself heading that way too if I'm not careful!
 

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