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Dementia-friendly hair salons

melly23

Registered User
Aug 27, 2016
13
North Lincolnshire
Hi

I work in the care sector and also I am a part time student. I deliver cohort sessions on dementia but I am only a novice. As a student I have an assignment to write on dementia friendly environments and I have chosen a hair salon. Has any of you used a hair salon, if so how did you feel about the environment? Did you feel that you had personal centred care? what was the hair salon like-décor, mirrows, flooring, signage, noise, and lighting. I would like to know others feelings on the subject.
Thank you:)
 
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BR_ANA

Registered User
Jun 27, 2012
1,079
Brazil
My mum has her hair done on CH. I think a calm hair saloon would be better than a noisy. So hair dryers are problem.
 

melly23

Registered User
Aug 27, 2016
13
North Lincolnshire
hair salons

thank you for your reply.
I really do appricate you getting back to me.
Do you mind if I ask how the hair dryer affects your mum, what do you have to do? how does she feel when she has her hair treatment. I know I have a lot of questions for you when you are very busy.

Thank Melanie
 

Wigan

Registered User
May 5, 2013
73
My mum is in a care home with a very modern, well equipped hair salon. However, if you aren't able to have a back wash (which mum isn't because of problems with her back) then she gets drenched as the sinks are pedestals and you can't get close to them because of the big padded pedestal at the base.

Also, mum had her hair cut there and we specifically asked for a particular style. The hairdresser cut it all off and gave her what we would call and institutionalised hairstyle that was horrendous. Mum hated it and so did we; it was very upsetting for us all as she completely ignored our instructions and did her own thing. We complained to her and she blatantly said she would never do mums hair again. Not as if we would ever let her near mums hair again. So unfortunately person centred care was most definitely not displayed on this occasion. However, some other families think highly of the hairdresser but that was our experience.
 

melly23

Registered User
Aug 27, 2016
13
North Lincolnshire
hair salons

Hi

Thank you for getting back to me regarding your mums and yours experience with the hairdresser. I feel I have to apologize for her. From your account more could be done. A) The hairdresser could have more training I was going to say on on person centered care but I feel also on her hair cutting techniques.
B) The equipment should cater for any disability. I know there is and attachment to collect water, which stops it wetting the person having their hair washed.
When you say modern a few things have not been taken into consideration.
Having our hair treatments means so much to us, it makes us feel on top of the world, we feel our troubles have been washed away with the water, we gain confidence and feel a new women. That was taken away from your mum.
I hope you don't mind me using the information on the wash basin and the person centered care in my essay.

Thank you

Melanie
 

Wigan

Registered User
May 5, 2013
73
Hi. The hairdresser rents the salon and is not employed by the home. I just borrow the key now and do mum's hair myself when the salon is closed. What equipment is there as maybe she uses it and I wasn't aware? Every time I wash mums hair it is a struggle as I can't get her close enough to the sink.

You are welcome to use the person centred care example in your essay and I will double check whether she does use any equipment as I have not seen anything but I could be wrong.
 

nae sporran

Volunteer Host
Oct 29, 2014
6,790
Bristol
I can't say I noticed whether signs or layout were particularly dementia friendly or otherwise, so probably were ok. The one thing which did help this time around was getting their more experienced stylist and being with my OH while she discussed what she wanted. Last time it was trainee and she didn't understand what was required.
Only went for a simple cut and blow dry, avoid anything too complicated. Hope any of that helps your research.
 

melly23

Registered User
Aug 27, 2016
13
North Lincolnshire
Hi

I have looked on line to see if I could find the device for washing a persons hair. I can not put a link in my post. However if you go on line and Google shampoo tray.

I am glad the home is accommodating you with getting your mum that much needed relaxation. Having our hair washed does wonders for our emotional well-being.

Thank you
 

melly23

Registered User
Aug 27, 2016
13
North Lincolnshire
Thank you Nae

I am glad that your experience and OH was pleasurable. I feel now that I am learning more and more about people living with dementia it is helping me not only in my studies and job. It is preparing me for the time when my dad who at the moment is in early stages of dementia to have a greater understanding.

Thank you
 

BR_ANA

Registered User
Jun 27, 2012
1,079
Brazil
thank you for your reply.
I really do appricate you getting back to me.
Do you mind if I ask how the hair dryer affects your mum, what do you have to do? how does she feel when she has her hair treatment. I know I have a lot of questions for you when you are very busy.

Thank Melanie
Noise made her more agitated and nervous.
She may feel her ears burning by heat but she won't talk about.
The wind in her ears disturb her.

What is done:
Hair cut dry ( not wet),
Very short hair.
Washing hair only on shower (not everyday), hot and dry bathroom, with towel to almost dry her hair and then (if weather is colder than 30C) hair dryer.

Feelings:
Now she is almost unable to speak, I will write about some years ago.
She used to hate strong noises, she used to say they hurt her. She used to be more agitated with high noises.
She liked the compliment she got after hair done. (It was more the compliment that her appearance, as she didn't recognised her image)
She feels cold when room is below 25C, (so no colour)
 

Jessbow

Registered User
Mar 1, 2013
3,014
West Hertfordshire
I don't think the salon its self plays a great part, you can have 20 well placed, appropriately coloured signs....which are all useless if the person doesn't understand what is written on them.

The hairdresser themselves is the most important part, they need patience and a calm approach, prepared to take their time, and to be prepared to listen to the carer as well as the client.

At the age of 83, my mother , then recently admitted to a nursing home, had her firstever wash & Set. She'd never had her hair set in her life! Really didn't matter, it was only a set ( A Maggie Thatcher'do') and it really did no harm, but what the hairdresser didn't get, was that Mum didn't have the words to tell her what she usually had, and after a long spell in hospital did look very unkempt.

Perhaps, rather than style books, clear A4 pictures of basic styles would be useful ie Short unlayered, Short layers, Perm, set, etc to give choices that cant be verballised
 

Pear trees

Registered User
Jan 25, 2015
441
I take my mum to a salon which plays calming panpipe music and has beautiful landscape pictures on the wall. The hairdresser is also a clairvoyant and spiritual healer, and mum feels very calm immediately on entering, and will even have a perm. The hairdresser says my mum is talking to her late husband who is always with her.
 

Lawson58

Registered User
Aug 1, 2014
2,138
Victoria, Australia
Jess is is absolutely right when she says that the hairdresser is far more important than the equipment that is used.

My hairdresser is very experienced in dealing with dementia patients, her mother having suffered with Alzheimer's for many years. She has several regular PWD and she is so good with them. She never leaves them to sit and wait, she offers a calm chat without expecting too much in reply, she works quickly and knows how they like to have their haircut.

It is a typical suburban salon with what I would call standard equipment but she doesn't go overboard with lots of bright lights. It is small salon and she likes to get her dementia clients to come in on her 'quiet' days, Mondays and Tuesdays so that she can take them on time.

There is nothing magical about what she does but she is kind and understands the practical realities of providing a good service to her customers.
 

melly23

Registered User
Aug 27, 2016
13
North Lincolnshire
Thank you all

I really do appreciate the time you have all spent expressing your feelings. I agree the hairdresser needs to have a person centered approach to anyone. I agree with the book of showing a few hair styles (however It must not have to much information because this can lead to confusion).I feel with the the population living longer then we need to look at what a business in the high street can do to become dementia friendly environment. If they did become dementia friendly would this help future generations live longer in the community?
Thank you:)