• All threads and posts regarding Coronavirus COVID-19 can now be found in our new area specifically for Coronavirus COVID-19 discussion.

    You can directly access this area >here<.

dementia following stroke

jomofo

Registered User
May 23, 2015
3
My partner had a major stroke in November. I have noticed his personality has changed dramatically since his return home. I know having a stroke can do this but I was concerned about him before his stroke as I noticed some changes in behaviour. I also understand having a stroke can cause vascular dementia does anyone know how quickly this could happen and what other signs there are please xx
 

Grey Lad

Registered User
Sep 12, 2014
5,736
North East Lincs
My partner had a major stroke in November. I have noticed his personality has changed dramatically since his return home. I know having a stroke can do this but I was concerned about him before his stroke as I noticed some changes in behaviour. I also understand having a stroke can cause vascular dementia does anyone know how quickly this could happen and what other signs there are please xx
I am not sure there are general trends but our situation seems similar to your. I had concerns before stroke and they were confirmed in the following months. The initial diagnosis was MCI with vascular changes. When decline became apparent to all vascular dementia became the diagnosis. I understand the need for medics to be cautious in the first year as there can be improvements during that time. I sincerely hope that you see improvements and vascular dementia is not diagnosed.
 

Kevinl

Registered User
Aug 24, 2013
4,771
Salford
Hi Jomofo, welcome to TP
Below is a like to the AZ society fact sheet where it says "Not everyone who has a stroke will develop vascular dementia, but about 20 per cent of people who have a stroke do develop this post-stroke dementia within the following six months" so it is a possibility. It is possible too that as you call it "a change in his personality" that it could be something like depression a stroke is a bit of a life changer.
I would make a list of the specific symptoms and give it to the doctors and see what they think.
The stroke hasn't affected any of his senses too has it? If his vision or hearing has been impaired he may not be engaging properly because of this, only a thought.
K

http://www.alzheimers.org.uk/site/scripts/documents_info.php?documentID=161
 

jomofo

Registered User
May 23, 2015
3
I am not sure there are general trends but our situation seems similar to your. I had concerns before stroke and they were confirmed in the following months. The initial diagnosis was MCI with vascular changes. When decline became apparent to all vascular dementia became the diagnosis. I understand the need for medics to be cautious in the first year as there can be improvements during that time. I sincerely hope that you see improvements and vascular dementia is not diagnosed.
thanks for your reply greylad. If you don't mind me asking what started off your concerns. I kinda feel like I'm on my own his friends and family think because he looks alright that therefore he is and I should just get on with it x
 

Kjn

Registered User
Jul 27, 2013
5,835
I wish I'd known a stroke could end in this. We could have been more prepared.

Welcome to TP jomofo .
 

maryw

Registered User
Nov 16, 2008
3,805
Surrey
I noticed personality changes in my husband years before his major stroke. An MRI revealed he had numerous past strokes and that explained a lot. Perhaps it is a very fine line between vascular damage caused by strokes and vascular changes. The personality changes I noticed were apathy, inability to make decisions, out of character irritability and an obsession to check things, also emotionalism following the major stroke, e.g., crying at election results!! It does depend on which part of the brain your partner had his stroke. My husband has had numerous "lacunar" strokes. On a positive front my husband continues to work to regain some fine motor control in his right hand and one week ago and 2 years after his stroke he actually managed to hold a pen and write something. The brain is amazing in its plasticity. I understand how difficult it can be that nobody but you sees the personality changes!
 
Last edited:

cobden28

Registered User
Jan 31, 2012
442
My late MIL was diagnosed with vascular dementia - I was at her hospital bedside when the official diagnosis was given to the family by a hospital doctor - after a series of mini-strokes.

Nobody realised that these TIA's would result in eventual dementia, but as MIL was always the type who let the menfolk in the family organise everything in her life for her anyway, we didn't notice much difference in her. She still lived at home with her second husband who cared for her, but eventually it got to be too much for her husband so MIL had to go into a home.
 

Soobee

Registered User
Aug 22, 2009
2,734
South
My mum had a stroke but it may have been just a particularly devastating TIA. Over the next year her behaviour changed and she was diagnosed with vascular dementia.

I asked the Stroke Association why people didn't make it obvious that she could get dementia after a stroke and they said that it would scare people who are already depressed and struggling, to think that they might have dementia too.
 

jomofo

Registered User
May 23, 2015
3
I noticed personality changes in my husband years before his major stroke. An MRI revealed he had numerous past strokes and that explained a lot. Perhaps it is a very fine line between vascular damage caused by strokes and vascular changes. The personality changes I noticed were apathy, inability to make decisions, out of character irritability and an obsession to check things, also emotionalism following the major stroke, e.g., crying at election results!! It does depend on which part of the brain your partner had his stroke. My husband has had numerous "lacunar" strokes. On a positive front my husband continues to work to regain some fine motor control in his right hand and one week ago and 2 years after his stroke he actually managed to hold a pen and write something. The brain is amazing in its plasticity. I understand how difficult it can be that nobody but you sees the personality changes!
the above mentioned personality changes are very similar to my partners he too gets very emotional at very random things, he is very obsessive (with food in particular) he has also become very selfish and has had a few nasty moments where fists have been raised at me he also has told his family horrible lies about me e.g I'm starving him, I'm going to leave him, I bully him he has even told strangers in the supermarket that I'm nasty to him. what upsets me the most about his friends and family is that when he was in hospital they all promised me that when he was home they would come round and keep him company whilst I'm at work and take him out etc. I understand that everyone has their own lives but in the 4-5 months he has been home this has only happened a couple of times. Has this happened to other people where you are suddenly on your own?
 
Last edited:

maryw

Registered User
Nov 16, 2008
3,805
Surrey
Oh yes, one of my husband's sons hasn't visited for 18 months, I know it's difficult for him. Very few realise the day to day difficulties as when they meet there is a bravado of all being well....... Then they comment on how wonderful the improvement is......, yes, but ..........,,,

PS: My husband slams doors on me if I dare to disagree in any way. There is no way he would ever have done that when I first knew him, always the gentleman. But I am the only one who sees that. I choose to walk away as it is not him, but the illness. So sad. Distraction is the key :)
 
Last edited:

Grey Lad

Registered User
Sep 12, 2014
5,736
North East Lincs
thanks for your reply greylad. If you don't mind me asking what started off your concerns. I kinda feel like I'm on my own his friends and family think because he looks alright that therefore he is and I should just get on with it x
Sorry I have just picked up your request for more information. My O H just seemed to lose cognitive capacity. She just couldn't grasp some basic things that she used to do before. Such things as controlling the central heating or using the remote for the T V became problematic. She kept losing her medication or prescriptions.

My Oh was very good at concealing her shortcoming from her family. They saw me as the problem. Now it is a little different but she still puts on a good show when they visit. I will P M you something I have written that details events here. Don't hesitate to ask if there is any more I can help with but there are others on T P who have far more experience than me. Good Luck.