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Dealing with delirium and delusions?

Emmcee

Registered User
Dec 28, 2015
10
Hi there,
Until recently, my mum was living at home independently - courtesy of an incredibly rigid routine and lots of informal support. She became a bit more confused following the lockdown but things were still manageable(ish).
She then had a fall, dislocated her shoulder, developed a UTI as well as a delirium and spent the next 8 days in hospital before being discharged with an a.m. and p.m. service a fortnight ago.
Two weeks down the line she's still displaying fairly florid delusions and hallucinations - at times, I think the trigger is the carers who let themselves into her house using the key safe. She's phoning me numerous times a day because strangers have been in her house/ taken her bank details amongst other things. She's reported the carers/ is phoning her bank++/ her solicitor/ the plumber++ depending on the prevailing delusion.
I've tried using distraction technique, I've tried being understanding of how distressing this all is and assuring her I would sort it out, I've tried leaving her with an up to date bank statement or the deeds to her house to address those concerns.... sometimes she then realises that her beliefs are not real but, at other times, she remains really distressed.
Does anyone have any other suggestions of how best to deal with this from a distance? (I live 1 1/2 hours away, Talk to her on the phone regularly throughout the day and visit twice a week).
Thanks,
Emm
 

mature

New member
Jun 6, 2020
1
Hi, I don't really have an answer but this is so similar to our journey. I would say that your GP is probably a good port of call and express your concerns, your mum may have a secondary infection or it may be the course of her illness. The doctor can refer to social work for an assessment.

We actually found salvation in the dog walker, who agreed to come in 3 times a day and even make meals and sit and converse while Mr A had his meals. its really tricky. I also live 2hrs away and would do a 4 hr round trip and come home utterly exhausted.

Everyone journey is unique. I would honestly try and find a local person who you can pay to be the main carer. There is seldom continuity with the carers and the person with dementia seem to work well with a regular routine and very regular carers. be patient with yourself, its unchartered waters for everyone.
 

Roseleigh

Registered User
Dec 26, 2016
322
How about removing her land phone and replacing with a mobile dementia phone with which she can only call you and a few people?
 

Emmcee

Registered User
Dec 28, 2015
10
:)
How about removing her land phone and replacing with a mobile dementia phone with which she can only call you and a few people?
I'd originally planned on doing just that, but such is Mum's routine that she perceives her dementia friendly mobile phone as being for emergencies only or as a means of us finding her should she ever wander off and get lost. She actually became really distressed, overwhelmed and even quite aggressive when she thought I was going to remove the landline completely. I thought I was then being clever, insofar as I left her landline phone but removed all but essential numbers and "removed" her address books/ bits of paper etc. only to find that she'd got even more "post it notes" tucked away. It was almost funny :)
Emm
 

Emmcee

Registered User
Dec 28, 2015
10
Hi, I don't really have an answer but this is so similar to our journey. I would say that your GP is probably a good port of call and express your concerns, your mum may have a secondary infection or it may be the course of her illness. The doctor can refer to social work for an assessment.

We actually found salvation in the dog walker, who agreed to come in 3 times a day and even make meals and sit and converse while Mr A had his meals. its really tricky. I also live 2hrs away and would do a 4 hr round trip and come home utterly exhausted.

Everyone journey is unique. I would honestly try and find a local person who you can pay to be the main carer. There is seldom continuity with the carers and the person with dementia seem to work well with a regular routine and very regular carers. be patient with yourself, its unchartered waters for everyone.
Hi there,
I've been down the GP route and she does already have a care manager from the CMHT.
Mum has recently been treated for a urine infection and that, coupled with the fall and period of hospitalisation has simply served to exacerbate things.
We did find a local carer who was ostensibly employed to help with housework and "popped in when she was in the area", but she unfortunately resigned just at the start of lockdown because she's also a carer for her own mum. It is certainly something that I plan on organising again as soon as possible.
I can really identify with your exhaustion after a 4 hour round trip. It can be so challenging, although I almost found things more difficult when I recenlty moved in for a few days simply because she simply wasn't safe to be left alone... I almost wanted to murder her and even when I took myself off to the garden to get a bit of breathing space or have a wee cry, she'd then come looking for me!
Emm