1. Expert Q&A: Protecting a person with dementia from financial abuse - Weds 26 June, 3:30-4:30 pm

    Financial abuse can have serious consequences for a person with dementia. Find out how to protect a person with dementia from financial abuse.

    Sam, our Knowledge Officer (Legal and Welfare Rights) is our expert on this topic. She will be here to answer your questions on Wednesday 26 June between 3:30 - 4:30 pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

  1. witsend~1

    witsend~1 Registered User

    Jul 16, 2014
    31
    North Lincolnshire
    This is a really daft question but how do I find out what type of AZ my husband has? He's had several scans which all apparently show normal wear and tear for his age (76) He definitely has AZ and is clearly changing physically and mentally. He's had it for several years but only diagnosed in Sept 14. :eek:
     
  2. pamann

    pamann Registered User

    Oct 28, 2013
    2,635
    Kent
    Witsend1 hello my hubby has AD he had a brain scan 2yrs ago the Dr said the same as for your hubby wear and tear my hubby is 75 to be honest l think the symtons are much the same for all dementia's, most people on this forum are suffering much the same my hubby was diagnosed 2yrs ago but had it for 8yrs, it is such a horrible disease, sorry that you are having to deal with all the stress that it brings us.
     
  3. witsend~1

    witsend~1 Registered User

    Jul 16, 2014
    31
    North Lincolnshire
    Daft Question

    Thank you.
    The hardest part is taking control. Whereas we would make joint decisions I now have to 'just go for it' which can lead to conflict (which fortunately, and because of the AZ) is fairly quickly forgotten! Ah well,like thousands of others we just get on with it and keep smiling to the outside world but also have lots of laughter ...Like the song goes..."always look on the bright side!"
     
  4. Kevinl

    Kevinl Registered User

    Aug 24, 2013
    4,665
    Salford
    I've seen my wife described as "mixed" and "atypical" type of Alzheimer's I've never bothered to push for a specific, exact, clinical definition of what exactly it is as I don't see how it would benefit me to know, all it would do is tie up NHS time and ultimately solve nothing as I'd still have to deal with the situation the way it is and I can do that without knowing.
    I appreciate other people feel differently, that's them this is me.
    I daresay many take the car into the garage you don't need to know the ins and outs of the grunion flange spring that's the cause of the funny noise you just want to know how much and how soon can you fix it.
    As long as I know there's no treatment or if there is she's getting it knowing the exact words it's called may matter to some but not to me.
    I would have thought your GP could tell you but every letter that goes from the memory clinic to the GP (I get copied in) starts with the nature of her illness "mixed" and "atypical" AZ.
    K
     
  5. stanleypj

    stanleypj Registered User

    Dec 8, 2011
    10,561
    North West
    #6 stanleypj, Apr 6, 2015
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2015
    I agree with Kevin.

    If you really want a label they will give you one, though they may change it later and a different professional may disagree - but increasingly, it seems, they wisely hedge their bets.

    How does the label help? You know what the person you care for can and can't do. How can someone else, who doesn't know the person like you do, tell you anything else that is really going to help?

    For all we know, there may eventually be as many possible labels as here are people with dementia.

    It's not by any means a daft question though.
     
  6. Anongirl

    Anongirl Registered User

    Aug 8, 2012
    2,675
    Hi! My mum was labelled with mixed dementia at 65. She had a stroke at 55 and showed mild signs soon after therefore I always assumed her dementia was vascular, due to the damage of the stroke. They say they can't diagnose Alzheimer's from a scan so I never really understood why they say she has mixed dementia!

    I got tired of asking questions to be honest. There just didn't seem a definitive answer. All I could think was that the vascular damage led to Alzheimer's features.

    To be honest with all the research they do I still think the workings of the human brain are just too complex to understand fully!

    It's great you have a positive outlook. You will find lots of people on TP who are in a similar position. I've learnt a lot from them about coping! X
     

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