• All threads and posts regarding Coronavirus COVID-19 can be found in our area specifically for Coronavirus COVID-19 discussion.

    You can directly access this area >here<.

Dad refuses to admit he has dementia

Sasperilla

Registered User
Aug 17, 2020
10
0
Hello everyone,
I’ve been reading the posts but not posted yet. My Dad was diagnosed with mixed dementia last year. He had one home visit from the memory clinic nurse and takes his medication. It was a really stressful visit as he was quite angry and felt betrayed, as he is insistent that there is nothing wrong with him. Even now, when he forgets what you’ve told him 5 minutes earlier, he seems to lack insight that his memory is shot.
Because of this, I feel very out of the loop with what is happening. I keep wondering if he should get his medication reviewed but my step mum says that he won’t go back to the G.P.
He is now waking with ‘night terrors’, insisting that he needs to be taken home etc. I think it could be the medication from what I’ve read here but it’s very frustrating getting information second hand from my step mum and not being able to speak to the nurse or doctor.
Is there anything that anyone could suggest that I could do?

Thanks!
 

Grannie G

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 3, 2006
75,006
0
Kent
Hello @Sasperilla I`m pleased you have decided to post.

Please try not to discuss your dad's dementia with him. If he doesn't`t want to discuss it, let it be. Whatever you do or say will be met with either denial or defence.

If you and your step mother have concerns about his medication his doctor will listen to you even if they refuse to discuss. Having nightmares could be related to the medication he is now taking and it may need changing to something more beneficial. The doctor will find a way to help your dad I`m sure.
 

Sasperilla

Registered User
Aug 17, 2020
10
0
Thanks Gr
Hello @Sasperilla I`m pleased you have decided to post.

Please try not to discuss your dad's dementia with him. If he doesn't`t want to discuss it, let it be. Whatever you do or say will be met with either denial or defence.

If you and your step mother have concerns about his medication his doctor will listen to you even if they refuse to discuss. Having nightmares could be related to the medication he is now taking and it may need changing to something more beneficial. The doctor will find a way to help your dad I`m sur
Hello @Sasperilla I`m pleased you have decided to post.

Please try not to discuss your dad's dementia with him. If he doesn't`t want to discuss it, let it be. Whatever you do or say will be met with either denial or defence.

If you and your step mother have concerns about his medication his doctor will listen to you even if they refuse to discuss. Having nightmares could be related to the medication he is now taking and it may need changing to something more beneficial. The doctor will find a way to help your dad I`m sure.

Thanks Grannie G. I never discuss it with him, I’ve always just gone with whatever he wants to talk about, even if it’s asking the same question 10 times in an hour. But it’s reassuring to know that it’s ok to just do this. I will ask my stepmum to mention the night confusion to the GP. I just wish there was a way that I could speak directly with his GP myself to reassure myself.
 

Grannie G

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 3, 2006
75,006
0
Kent
I just wish there was a way that I could speak directly with his GP myself to reassure myself.

I don't see any reason why you can't . You can see your dad's GP as a concerned daughter. The visit will be confidential.

I saw my father's GP in confidence because I knew my mother was seeing what she wanted to see and thought progression meant he would get better.
 

Duggies-girl

Registered User
Sep 6, 2017
3,008
0
It seems that some GP's are more helpful than others. My dads GP actually prized my phone number out of dad and rang me with his concerns. I told that I shared those concerns and would try to get dad back to the surgery. It took another couple of years before I managed that. Dads GP then asked dad if it was okay to speak to me about dad, dad said yes and I think his GP just took that as permission to speak to me from then on. The GP would ring me about anything and everything to do with dad. He was wonderful and had dads best interests at heart.
 

Sasperilla

Registered User
Aug 17, 2020
10
0
It seems that some GP's are more helpful than others. My dads GP actually prized my phone number out of dad and rang me with his concerns. I told that I shared those concerns and would try to get dad back to the surgery. It took another couple of years before I managed that. Dads GP then asked dad if it was okay to speak to me about dad, dad said yes and I think his GP just took that as permission to speak to me from then on. The GP would ring me about anything and everything to do with dad. He was wonderful and had dads best interests at heart.
Sounds like a wonderful GP! My Dad has had the same GP for a long, long time so fingers crossed, it will be similar.
 

Frank24

Registered User
Feb 13, 2018
239
0
It seems that some GP's are more helpful than others. My dads GP actually prized my phone number out of dad and rang me with his concerns. I told that I shared those concerns and would try to get dad back to the surgery. It took another couple of years before I managed that. Dads GP then asked dad if it was okay to speak to me about dad, dad said yes and I think his GP just took that as permission to speak to me from then on. The GP would ring me about anything and everything to do with dad. He was wonderful and had dads best interests at heart.
He sounds like a great GP! Amazing