Dad falling as he cannot remember he can't walk

LittleWren

New member
Aug 8, 2019
7
Hello,
My dad has recently moved to residential care. To cut a long story (who doesn't have a long story?!) short, he has almost nil mobility, coupled with memory problems / confusion (he is undiagnosed but we believe it to be vascular dementia). This means that, he either forgets he shouldn't move without assistance - 2 carers use a stand aid to transfer him - or else he believes he CAN walk, so he frequently tries to get up and walk a couple of paces, and then of course is falling. He has other health problems, including diabetes and is on blood thinners for AF - plus he suffered a stroke some years ago which kick-started the mobility issues. He is therefore very high risk for fall injury. Last year he fell and sustained a brain injury as a result - from when the memory problems really began. He has had multiple falls in the home over the past 3 months that he has been there - one of which resulted in an A&E trip when he bumped his head again. The home have put an alarmed mat in front of his chair so they can be quickly alerted if he stands, and we have a big sign next to him telling him to stay in his chair..but, still he tries to get up.
Does anyone have any similar experience? If he had poor mobility but no dementia, or dementia but good mobility, I think we could find a strategy, but this combination of very bad mobility AND memory problems is very challenging, and we are all waiting for a bad accident to happen.....
Thank you
 

nellbelles

Volunteer Host
Nov 6, 2008
8,549
leicester
Hello @LittleWren and welcome to DTP
What a difficult position for your Dad to be in, I’m afraid I don’t have a helpful answer for you but wanted to welcome you to a very supportive and friendly forum, hopefully someone will reply with some constructive comments soon.
I hope now you have found us you will continue to post
 

Banjomansmate

Registered User
Jan 13, 2019
1,441
Dorset
The Banjoman fell and broke his femur a few weeks ago but his cognition is such that the physiotherapist was unable to get him walking again. His Care Home staff have done the same for him, mat in front of him etc. but last week he managed to fall sideways and split his head open on his bed frame, meaning another visit to A & E. Until last week he would stay up in his room but now they are doing their best to to get him spending time downstairs in the communal areas so that they can keep an eye on him if he decides he wants to stand up.
Other than that I'm not sure what more they can do.
 

LittleWren

New member
Aug 8, 2019
7
Hello @LittleWren and welcome to DTP
What a difficult position for your Dad to be in, I’m afraid I don’t have a helpful answer for you but wanted to welcome you to a very supportive and friendly forum, hopefully someone will reply with some constructive comments soon.
I hope now you have found us you will continue to post
Thank you, the forum does look very supportive :)
 

LittleWren

New member
Aug 8, 2019
7
The Banjoman fell and broke his femur a few weeks ago but his cognition is such that the physiotherapist was unable to get him walking again. His Care Home staff have done the same for him, mat in front of him etc. but last week he managed to fall sideways and split his head open on his bed frame, meaning another visit to A & E. Until last week he would stay up in his room but now they are doing their best to to get him spending time downstairs in the communal areas so that they can keep an eye on him if he decides he wants to stand up.
Other than that I'm not sure what more they can do.
I'm sorry, that sounds very tough. I know the staff at my dad's home are trying to encourage him to sit in the lounge and eat in the dining room, but he doesn't really want to engage. I know the staff are worried about his falling but yes, I'm not sure what else they can do either..
 

Grannie G

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 3, 2006
70,333
Kent
My husband was in that position. He couldn't remember he couldn't walk so was falling all the time. Fortunately he slid off the bed or off the chair so didn`t hurt himself.

The care home tried him in a recliner chair but it wasn't successful. He felt trapped and kept trying to get down.

This stage didn't last long. It seemed my husband eventually realised he could get up without help. I hope it will be the same for your dad @LittleWren
 

Rosettastone57

Registered User
Oct 27, 2016
1,150
Hello,
My dad has recently moved to residential care. To cut a long story (who doesn't have a long story?!) short, he has almost nil mobility, coupled with memory problems / confusion (he is undiagnosed but we believe it to be vascular dementia). This means that, he either forgets he shouldn't move without assistance - 2 carers use a stand aid to transfer him - or else he believes he CAN walk, so he frequently tries to get up and walk a couple of paces, and then of course is falling. He has other health problems, including diabetes and is on blood thinners for AF - plus he suffered a stroke some years ago which kick-started the mobility issues. He is therefore very high risk for fall injury. Last year he fell and sustained a brain injury as a result - from when the memory problems really began. He has had multiple falls in the home over the past 3 months that he has been there - one of which resulted in an A&E trip when he bumped his head again. The home have put an alarmed mat in front of his chair so they can be quickly alerted if he stands, and we have a big sign next to him telling him to stay in his chair..but, still he tries to get up.
Does anyone have any similar experience? If he had poor mobility but no dementia, or dementia but good mobility, I think we could find a strategy, but this combination of very bad mobility AND memory problems is very challenging, and we are all waiting for a bad accident to happen.....
Thank you
My mother-in-law was like this when she was in her care home . She was a high falls risk which was one of the reasons she went into residential care in the first place. The care home provided sensor mats sensor chair all this type of thing but to be frank it didn't really make a lot of difference. She simply couldn't remember that she couldn't walk. No magic answers I'm afraid
 

Canadian Joanne

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 8, 2005
16,231
65
Toronto, Canada
@LittleWren does your father use a wheelchair? My mother's wheelchair had a tray on it which effectively prevented her from getting up. I know this sounds like restraints but I think it's preferable to a person falling and breaking bones.
 

bpop

New member
Aug 4, 2019
7
Hello,
My dad has recently moved to residential care. To cut a long story (who doesn't have a long story?!) short, he has almost nil mobility, coupled with memory problems / confusion (he is undiagnosed but we believe it to be vascular dementia). This means that, he either forgets he shouldn't move without assistance - 2 carers use a stand aid to transfer him - or else he believes he CAN walk, so he frequently tries to get up and walk a couple of paces, and then of course is falling. He has other health problems, including diabetes and is on blood thinners for AF - plus he suffered a stroke some years ago which kick-started the mobility issues. He is therefore very high risk for fall injury. Last year he fell and sustained a brain injury as a result - from when the memory problems really began. He has had multiple falls in the home over the past 3 months that he has been there - one of which resulted in an A&E trip when he bumped his head again. The home have put an alarmed mat in front of his chair so they can be quickly alerted if he stands, and we have a big sign next to him telling him to stay in his chair..but, still he tries to get up.
Does anyone have any similar experience? If he had poor mobility but no dementia, or dementia but good mobility, I think we could find a strategy, but this combination of very bad mobility AND memory problems is very challenging, and we are all waiting for a bad accident to happen.....
Thank you
 

LittleWren

New member
Aug 8, 2019
7
+
@LittleWren does your father use a wheelchair? My mother's wheelchair had a tray on it which effectively prevented her from getting up. I know this sounds like restraints but I think it's preferable to a person falling and breaking bones.
He does when carers are moving him from his room to the dining room or the lounge/garden, but he doesn't try to get up then.. It's when he is in his room on his own. I hope like Grannie G said that eventually he will start to settle at the home and the instinct to get up and move will pass...! Thank you for your advice x
 

LittleWren

New member
Aug 8, 2019
7
My mother-in-law was like this when she was in her care home . She was a high falls risk which was one of the reasons she went into residential care in the first place. The care home provided sensor mats sensor chair all this type of thing but to be frank it didn't really make a lot of difference. She simply couldn't remember that she couldn't walk. No magic answers I'm afraid
thank you Rosettastone...it helps to know there are others in this situation x
 

Banjomansmate

Registered User
Jan 13, 2019
1,441
Dorset
Just back from visiting The Banjoman. Even sitting in a chair he’s not safe as he managed to slip off one yesterday and bit his lip. With the bruises from last Monday’s fall and a fat lip he looks as though he’s been in the ring with Henry Cooper!