1. Expert Q&A: Protecting a person with dementia from financial abuse - Weds 26 June, 3:30-4:30 pm

    Financial abuse can have serious consequences for a person with dementia. Find out how to protect a person with dementia from financial abuse.

    Sam, our Knowledge Officer (Legal and Welfare Rights) is our expert on this topic. She will be here to answer your questions on Wednesday 26 June between 3:30 - 4:30 pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

  1. alimary298

    alimary298 Registered User

    Jun 8, 2015
    2
    Father in law has had vascular dementia for the past few years following some tia's. He still lives alone in jis own home with us helping to care for him but we've recently noticed he has started to cut his own hair. It doesn't need doing as his daughter (a hairdresser ) keeps it in shape but we find clumps of grey hair in the hand basin regularly! He's 86. Has anyone else found that this is yet another symptom. We are gradually learning so much about this condition
     
  2. Tin

    Tin Registered User

    May 18, 2014
    4,829
    UK
    My mum with Vascular Dementia, did this only for a short time, any little bits of hair sticking out got the chop. However she was keen on keeping the scissors around and was always cutting things up. She moved from cutting up old rags and newspaper to the dog lead and buttons on nightie, jumpers and her favourite coat. I hid all the scissors as it looked like this activity was taking over our lives, instead some other less dangerous obsession took over.
     
  3. Onlyme

    Onlyme Registered User

    Apr 5, 2010
    4,999
    UK
    I had to hide all scissors after Mum cut dressing gown cords, a skirt and I even caught her eyeing up the lamp cable.:eek:
     
  4. Tin

    Tin Registered User

    May 18, 2014
    4,829
    UK
    That was probably it for me too. She said to me that there were a lot of things hanging from the tv!
     
  5. alimary298

    alimary298 Registered User

    Jun 8, 2015
    2
    Thanks these replies are helpful. We keep noticing him doing things and then eventually discover they're all part of the illness. he also sits hours polishing a pebble he once found on the beach or a small wooden vase he has. That too has become a habit but I recently read that sufferers like to sit and 'fiddle' with something.
     
  6. lavenderblue

    lavenderblue Registered User

    Nov 2, 2014
    23
    UK
    To provide your father-in-law with safer things to fiddle with, if you or a relative enjoy sewing, could you maybe make him a "twiddle" cushion or a knee blanket with zips, buttons, buckles, large poppers, worry beads or buttons threaded on a strong cord, fringes, strips of velcro etc. on a base of different fabric textures that feel nice to the touch, like velvet, jumbo cord or fake fur?

    Or put together a rummage box of tactile "treasures" that are badly in need of burnishing?

    Could the scissors be tied on a short length of tape that is fixed to a table or work surface ("so they can't get lost") so they are long enough to use on the table but not long enough to reach up to his hair (though I suppose he might use the scissors to cut them free of the tape and then cut his hair if he's really determined to practice his hairdressing skills).
     
  7. Tin

    Tin Registered User

    May 18, 2014
    4,829
    UK
    At the moment Polishing things is something my mum does a lot anything with a metallic surface, before this it was her boots. This activity does seem to keep her calm and I spend time looking round the house for other things she might like to polish, but she always returns to the metallic stuff. Before Christmas she became obsessed with the Velcro on her boots.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.