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Could he have Parkinsons too?

thebes

Registered User
Feb 10, 2014
163
London
The more I observe what is happening to my OH and the recent physical deterioration, the more I wonder if he is developing Parkinsons too. We are due back at the doctor's in a couple of weeks after a month off medication. So far he is more wakeful and content but walking and balance going downhill all the time. Even if it is Parkinsons is there any treatment he can have?
 

nitram

Registered User
Apr 6, 2011
19,890
North Manchester
Even if it is Parkinsons is there any treatment he can have?

There are medications that can suppress some of the symptoms but some are contraindicated with some forms of dementia.

What makes you suspect Parkinsons, tremor, gait, or something else?
 

jikkie

Registered User
Aug 23, 2015
64
My OH has Parkinsons too now. The doctor noticed he was walking oddly, kind of pushing his heels forward, rather than lifting the foot. Then a retired doctor neighbour noticed too and mentioned it to me. No tremors. But he is generally very stiff. No facial expression.. Holds his arms stiffly while walking too. Basically all his movements are stiff and unnatural.

It took 5 mths to get to see someone. He has started on the drug, and we go back in 3 mths. I think there is a small improvement, but a bit marginal.
 

thebes

Registered User
Feb 10, 2014
163
London
Even if it is Parkinsons is there any treatment he can have?

There are medications that can suppress some of the symptoms but some are contraindicated with some forms of dementia.

What makes you suspect Parkinsons, tremor, gait, or something else?
Partly lack of balance and swallowing problems, but mainly it is the recent very odd walk where his right leg has periods of not cooperating with him, and also spells of rigidity in his limbs. He does not have tremors , his face is more impassive but not totally fixed in expression
 

nitram

Registered User
Apr 6, 2011
19,890
North Manchester
I'm not a medic but speaking from experience, I watched several neurological examinations of my wife and always asked why they did something and what they were looking for, I think it should be investigated.

I would write everything down so that when you visit the doctor you don't forget anything.

If you flex his arm does the elbow move smoothly or is there resistance, the phrase is cogwheel movement which I think is self explanatory?
 

thebes

Registered User
Feb 10, 2014
163
London
I'm not a medic but speaking from experience, I watched several neurological examinations of my wife and always asked why they did something and what they were looking for, I think it should be investigated.

I would write everything down so that when you visit the doctor you don't forget anything.

If you flex his arm does the elbow move smoothly or is there resistance, the phrase is cogwheel movement which I think is self explanatory?
Thanks I will try that tomorrow, and in the meantime start writing it all down for when we see our GP again soon.
 

stanleypj

Registered User
Dec 8, 2011
10,707
North West
I agree with nitram. The cogwheel arm movement seems very significant. The consultant who first confirmed that Sue probably had PD picked up that very symptom. Other docs we've seen though have said either that there are just Parkinsonisms that she has or that the various possible symptoms are all down to the AD. But as the first doc said 'Let's not get hung up on labels'. Sue was prescribed sinemet and overall I think it may have helped though it may also have caused or contributed to fits. It certainly caused some vomiting initially.
 

Marylil52

Registered User
Mar 26, 2015
39
Could he have Parkinson's too?

I'm not a medic and am very wary of careless comments. But... My husband had cognitive difficulties which were getting worse; he then developed twitches in his eyes, and tremors in his legs. In due course, after much testing and exploration, the (wonderful) doctors at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery in London diagnosed an atypical form of Dementia with Lewy Body. This is related to Parkinson's but affects a different part of the brain, as I understand it. The cognitive trouble and the tremors have got a good deal worse, as has the lack of facial expression (no hallucinations thank goodness) but Sinemet, recently begun at low dose, has helped quite a lot with the tremors.

Might it be worth asking your local people about the possibility of DLB? I gather it's frequently under-diagnosed. One important reason for obtaining a diagnosis is that with DLB many antipsychotic drugs can be extremely dangerous.

I hope this is useful and not either alarmist or misleading. I wish you good luck.
 

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