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Could an insulin nasal spray help treat Alzheimer's?

Discussion in 'Dementia-related news and campaigns' started by jimbo 111, Jan 9, 2015.

  1. jimbo 111

    jimbo 111 Registered User

    Jan 23, 2009
    5,078
    North Bucks
    Could an insulin nasal spray help treat Alzheimer's?

    Last updated: Today at 8am PST





    Every 67 seconds, someone in the US develops Alzheimer's disease. More than 5 million Americans are living with the condition and it is responsible for around half a million deaths each year. But in a new study, researchers from the Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, NC, reveal they may have found a promising new treatment for the disease - in the form of an insulin nasal spray.



    The researchers, led by Suzanne Craft, PhD, professor of gerontology and geriatric medicine at Wake Forest, found the spray may also be effective for patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), which is estimated to affect around 10-20% of people over the age of 65.
    In September 2011, Medical News Today reported on another study by Craft and colleagues revealing that an insulin nasal spray improved memory among patients with Alzheimer's and other forms of cognitive impairment.
    In that study, participants received 20 or 40 international units (IU) of insulin via a nasal drug delivery device. In this latest study, however, the team used the same device to deliver 20 or 40 IU of insulin detemir - a manufactured form of insulin that provides longer-lasting effects, compared with "regular" insulin.
    Read more


    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/287837.php
     

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