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Continuing health care advice please

elizabeth gagen

Registered User
Feb 5, 2021
14
0
Hi , my mum has recently been assessed to go to the next stage to see if she is eligible for CHC by the NHS. As a family we instructed solicitors to gather all the medical documents /evidence were mum met the threshold. We are now waiting for a date to attend a MDT meeting , family are invited to this meeting and will be able to ask questions and put thier views across. My mum is currently in a care home with vascular dementia along with other high end health care needs.

Has anyone been to a MDT meeting recently and if so how was it for the family and what was the outcome ?

What were the reasons the funding was awarded or not ?
Any advise would be much appreciated , Thankyou.
Liz :)
 

Palerider

Registered User
Aug 9, 2015
2,537
0
North West
I'm going through the same process and have also instructed a legal firm. I would make sure that the firm provides an advocate for you at the MDT as well as your own attendance -but this may come at extra cost.
 

kindred

Registered User
Apr 8, 2018
2,670
0
Hi , my mum has recently been assessed to go to the next stage to see if she is eligible for CHC by the NHS. As a family we instructed solicitors to gather all the medical documents /evidence were mum met the threshold. We are now waiting for a date to attend a MDT meeting , family are invited to this meeting and will be able to ask questions and put thier views across. My mum is currently in a care home with vascular dementia along with other high end health care needs.

Has anyone been to a MDT meeting recently and if so how was it for the family and what was the outcome ?

What were the reasons the funding was awarded or not ?
Any advise would be much appreciated , Thankyou.
Liz :)
Yes, I have been to a meeting fairly recently and CHC was awarded two days after my husband died and backdated for a month, so it was £5000.
They were impressed that I had logged each time actual nursing care was required, they saw for themselves that he could not communicate. I had logged changes in his mental state. He had no mobility and had to be fed.
It’s really about how much actual nursing care is needed.
The very best of luck with this. Warmest, Geraldine
 

Jaded'n'faded

Registered User
Jan 23, 2019
1,489
0
High Peak
I'm going through the same process and have also instructed a legal firm. I would make sure that the firm provides an advocate for you at the MDT as well as your own attendance -but this may come at extra cost.
It concerns me greatly that people are employing solicitors to act for them in order to get CHC. It shouldn't be like this!

Even without legal assistance, it seems relatives are required to provide all sorts of evidence and documentation and basically fight against the system, which seems to have a default position of 'no'.

Can I assume then, that anyone who doesn't have strong, savvy relatives - or worse, no relatives at all - has no chance of getting CHC?
 

Palerider

Registered User
Aug 9, 2015
2,537
0
North West
It concerns me greatly that people are employing solicitors to act for them in order to get CHC. It shouldn't be like this!

Even without legal assistance, it seems relatives are required to provide all sorts of evidence and documentation and basically fight against the system, which seems to have a default position of 'no'.

Can I assume then, that anyone who doesn't have strong, savvy relatives - or worse, no relatives at all - has no chance of getting CHC?
Its luck of the draw I think. I have done everything I can over the last five years and had some real fights with the SS in getting mum the help she needs and I have done it as a sole carer mostly. I have reached the point where I am just tired and done in with it all and I can't fight the CHC on my own as I don't have a savvy group of supportive relatives around me. Challenging the CHC is harder because a lot of the assessment can be subjective rather than objective and if the care home staff don't document needs accurately the CHC will say there is no health need. It can become a mire of sifting through evidence which frankly any frazzled sole care just wouldn'tcope with unless they have time and a preserved mental constiution - of whch I have none anymore

If there are no relatives then the outlook is bleak unless someone acts on their behalf. Most care homes will apply for CHC funding for someone with no NOK but its very much open if a decision is in further need of challenge -who is there to challenge?

Sometimes its best to hand a problem over to the professionals if we feel we can't do it justice and we are certain that our view is right
 

elizabeth gagen

Registered User
Feb 5, 2021
14
0
I'm going through the same process and have also instructed a legal firm. I would make sure that the firm provides an advocate for you at the MDT as well as your own attendance -but this may come at extra cost.
Hi thankyou for that, we were offered an advocate for an extra cost of £1500 pounds , me and my brother are going to go together so we can try and fight our corner..ha.
 

kindred

Registered User
Apr 8, 2018
2,670
0
It concerns me greatly that people are employing solicitors to act for them in order to get CHC. It shouldn't be like this!

Even without legal assistance, it seems relatives are required to provide all sorts of evidence and documentation and basically fight against the system, which seems to have a default position of 'no'.

Can I assume then, that anyone who doesn't have strong, savvy relatives - or worse, no relatives at all - has no chance of getting CHC?
I agree with you Jaded! I was only me and two assessors. The nursing home provided the evidence. It was actually very low key and kind. They told m there and then that I would be awarded it subject to formal verification.
I am astonished at all this talk of relatives and evidence!! What is happening??? Warmest, kindred
 

elizabeth gagen

Registered User
Feb 5, 2021
14
0
It concerns me greatly that people are employing solicitors to act for them in order to get CHC. It shouldn't be like this!

Even without legal assistance, it seems relatives are required to provide all sorts of evidence and documentation and basically fight against the system, which seems to have a default position of 'no'.

Can I assume then, that anyone who doesn't have strong, savvy relatives - or worse, no relatives at all - has no chance of getting CHC?
Thankyou for your thoughts I agree with you entirely.
 

elizabeth gagen

Registered User
Feb 5, 2021
14
0
I agree with you Jaded! I was only me and two assessors. The nursing home provided the evidence. It was actually very low key and kind. They told m there and then that I would be awarded it subject to formal verification.
I am astonished at all this talk of relatives and evidence!! What is happening??? Warmest, kindred
The CHC team need information, medical records as to what type of care my mum has been receiving over the last 12 months or more which helps to make the final decision if she is eligible or not for the funding. Involving solicitors helps an awful lot in gathering the medical records because they know whats required towards the application. They look at mums health too how its deteriorated prior to her going into care. I wouldnt have known were to start to gather all whats required. It is a mind field and Im not looking forward to this meeting at all but we can only try.
 

elizabeth gagen

Registered User
Feb 5, 2021
14
0
Yes, I have been to a meeting fairly recently and CHC was awarded two days after my husband died and backdated for a month, so it was £5000.
They were impressed that I had logged each time actual nursing care was required, they saw for themselves that he could not communicate. I had logged changes in his mental state. He had no mobility and had to be fed.
It’s really about how much actual nursing care is needed.
The very best of luck with this. Warmest, Geraldine
Thankyou Geraldine im not looking forward to the meeting.
 

Peace lily

Registered User
Jan 30, 2020
83
0
Hi everyone, my dad has been in a nursing home for just over three months now. He was awarded CHC without any difficulty. The nursing home manager was excellent and seemed to know my dad really well. She had clear documentation and was able to answer questions off the top of her head. My dad has COPD which impacts on his day to day activities. He was scored 'severe' on the this. His mobility is very poor and he scored 'high' as a falls risk. I think that you only have to score two 'severe' or 'high' to qualify. You shouldn't have to pay to fight for something to that parent/loved one is entitled to? I wish each and everyone of you luck x
 

Palerider

Registered User
Aug 9, 2015
2,537
0
North West
Hi everyone, my dad has been in a nursing home for just over three months now. He was awarded CHC without any difficulty. The nursing home manager was excellent and seemed to know my dad really well. She had clear documentation and was able to answer questions off the top of her head. My dad has COPD which impacts on his day to day activities. He was scored 'severe' on the this. His mobility is very poor and he scored 'high' as a falls risk. I think that you only have to score two 'severe' or 'high' to qualify. You shouldn't have to pay to fight for something to that parent/loved one is entitled to? I wish each and everyone of you luck x
Hi @Peace lily its good that your dad has clearly marked health needs, the problem is that many people start out with hardly any needs in dementia but as they progress those needs grow but are sadly often normalised because of dementia -it then becomes very difficult to unravel normalisation that isn't actually ever a part of dementia care. For example I call the care home ad ask how mum is and the reaction is 'oh she's fine and ok' when the reality is she is not she is far from being 'ok' and 'fine' and you have to look at what is reflected in the documentation because that is what counts for CHC, many poeple miss the boat because they start out 'ok' and end up being defined as 'ok' when they actually have deteriorated so that score as you say two A's minimum or more
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
15,188
0
South coast
In case you havent seen it, Im posting the link for the CHC decision support tool, which is what the people making the decision about CHC are supposed to use. It tells you what should constitute severe, high, etc in all the different domains.
I hope its helpful in knowing what to aim for
 

jaymor

Volunteer Moderator
Jul 14, 2006
13,889
0
England
My husband’s first four years with Alzheimer’s we managed quite well, the next three saw great changes in both Alzheimer’s and his health. He went from home to an assessment unit where he stayed for 9 weeks.

He left the assessment unit to go into a nursing home with CHC and one to one care. The assessment unit applied for CHC. He kept the CHC until he died four years later. The one to one stopped just over two years after going into the nursing home as he was no longer mobile.