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    Do you have questions about medication and drug treatments for dementia? There's no drug to cure dementia yet, but it's often possible to relieve some symptoms.

    Our next expert Q&A will be hosted by Simon from our Knowledge Services team. He will be answering your questions on Thursday 22nd November from 3-4pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

Constant talking to people that aren't there and possessiveness

Discussion in 'Welcome and how to use Talking Point' started by Clairer82, Sep 11, 2018.

  1. Clairer82

    Clairer82 New member

    Sep 11, 2018
    3
    Hello, I'm new to this group and would love to hear from any one.. I'm a carer for my 55 year old down syndrome sister in law.. in December 2017 she was diagnosed with dementia.. she got put on anti phsycotic drugs as she was seeing snakes and blood on the floor which was really distressing to her and us as we couldn't convince her they weren't real.. however the medication was wrong for her she went like a zombie, a salivering mess wouldn't eat or drink lost 3st in 4 months.. we took her off them with the advice of medical staff.. however she has started some more now but she is constantly talking to people that aren't there, thinking her arm is a baby, she keeps saying people (her brother and nephew) are stood outside in the street fighting each other with guns and knives.. she is also getting very possessive over things from her slippers, to her hand bag and now staff from her day centre she goes to.. 1 in particular a young gentleman, but she is saying this person is her boyfriend and the father of her baby (her arm).. I was just wondering if anyone else has been through anything similar? Thanks for taking the time to read
     
  2. karaokePete

    karaokePete Volunteer Host

    Jul 23, 2017
    3,229
    Male
    Cyprus
    Hello @Clairer82, welcome to the forum. I hope you find this a friendly and supportive place.

    My situation isn't quite the same but my wife, who has dementia, does talk to non existent people and thinks I'm talking to her when I'm sitting silently. My wife has also mistaken my elbow for a small person behind me! It's very strange at times but with us it mainly happens at night and I put it down to sundowning and visual spatial issues.

    Other member may be able to shed more light on the matter. You may even be able to find some information in the publications list that you can find by clicking on this link https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/get-support/publications-factsheets-full-list
     
  3. karaokePete

    karaokePete Volunteer Host

    Jul 23, 2017
    3,229
    Male
    Cyprus
  4. Clairer82

    Clairer82 New member

    Sep 11, 2018
    3
    Thank you so much for your reply, it's nice to know there is somewhere like this to ask for advice
     
  5. Clairer82

    Clairer82 New member

    Sep 11, 2018
    3
    I've heard of this, that's when the hallucinations tend to get worse, but the talking etc is from morning until night..
     
  6. sunset2013

    sunset2013 Registered User

    Nov 22, 2013
    2
    Hi Claire, Does she have a visual impairment as some people with a visual impairment hallucinate due to Charles Bonnet Syndrome? These hallucinations are as real as you looking at me across a table and I have known people even talk to some images?
     
  7. firevixen 121

    firevixen 121 New member

    May 1, 2018
    7
    My Partner has Parkinson's Dementia and psychosis he also saw people all the time in the house and blamed them for everything he would talk to them. He was sectioned in March this year and in the psychiatric hospital was put on drugs for the Psychosis. From being able to walk and talk although it was rubbish he became a zombie couldnt walk anymore couldnt talk it wasnt nice to see. He had a bad episode of not being able to swallow he was rushed into a general hospital after 4 days he was sent back to Psychiatric hospital as they told me he was going to die he was sent to a Pallitive care home and all medication was stopped within two days he recovered so they then sent him to a care home that can assess his needs, I told them I did not want him put back on the medication for his Psychosis as it turned him into Zombie as I have both Power of Attorney i.e health and welfare as well as financial they did as I asked. He can now walk and speak the seeing people has stopped he is settled in a care home. Saying that every day is different some days are good some bad but coming off that drug is much better for him. That is my experience I hope it helps you in some way
     
  8. Banana2004

    Banana2004 Registered User

    May 5, 2016
    3
    Hi there
    I just thought I’d chip in as my Dad had Lewy Body Dementia (associated with Parkinsons) and he used to see people ie adults/children on the sofa opposite. He wasn’t distressed and we were advised not to contradict him as they were incredibly real to him. What did work well was distraction and he’d then seem to forget they were there. I know how distressing it can be for the carer but I learnt that entering their world caused less anxiety for them. I hope it helps just knowing people are/have been in the same boat! Take care.
     
  9. Iceni

    Iceni Registered User

    Oct 18, 2014
    2
    Hello @Clairer82

    I'm sorry to hear about your sister-in-law and the difficult time you are going through. We had a similar experience with my mother who was very anxious throughout her life and developed psychological issues, including hallucinations, in the initial stages of her dementia. She imagined she was reading unpleasant stories in a non-existent book, that I was riding a motorbike, and that my late father was in a chair talking to her. Children and babies featured in her hallucinations quite a lot. She also brought the nursing staff into the delusions. We provided reassurance, but it was very hard to calm her and her imagination seemed to go into overdrive. In time, she talked less about these things.

    I know how hard it is to keep reassuring over and over again and how real the hallucinations seem to be to the person. From researching my mother's condition at the time, it seemed that this is an area that is not well understood. We documented what she was saying and tried to see if there was a pattern, but there didn't appear to be.

    My mother's GP arranged for us to get valuable input from a Community Mental Health specialist and I made a point of emphasising the anxiety and hallucinations and the impact this had on my mother's well-being when we applied (successfully) for Continuing Healthcare.

    I hope that knowing you are not alone in this is some help.
     

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