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Constant Crying

Ferrit44

Registered User
Apr 1, 2020
18
76
Liverpool
Hello,
My wife cries all the time and will not be consoled, could someone please tell me if this is a state that would continue or abate at some point,
It’s tearing me apart to watch her and not to be able to help, we’ve had no proper sleep for three days,
I don’t know what else to say.
 

Vic10

Registered User
Feb 18, 2017
153
Sorry, I have no experience of this so can’t offer help other than to suggest you contact her GP.
Thinking of you and hoping your situation improves
 

Louise7

Registered User
Mar 25, 2016
2,363
Has the constant crying only started recently? It sounds like your wife is very anxious, which can be common in those with dementia, but I'm wondering if it's connected to the coronavirus situation - has she been seeing things on the TV that are making her anxious? She may also be picking up on your mood, as I know that if I'm stressed or anxious about something my Mum really picks up on it. If the crying is something that has only happened recently, rather than your wife being like this for a while, it may be worth changing what you watch on TV to see if that helps. It's really difficult for everyone at the moment but maybe avoiding too many news programmes/newspapers and trying to remain cheerful might make a difference to your wife's mood. Changes to usual routines can also cause anxiety. As per the advice above though, if this has been going on for a while contact the GP as there may by be some medication that can be given to help. Keep posting as there is lots of support here from forum members.
 

LynneMcV

Registered User
May 9, 2012
3,975
south-east London
Seeing my husband start to regularly cry was one of the most distressing things about this disease for me, because above all else I wanted him to feel loved and secure.

With my husband it was a mixture of things - a general awareness that things were not well, frustration that he could do less and less - and overwhelming sadness brought on by what he had read or seen in newspapers or on tv.

The latter two I could take charge of to some extent but there was still that underlying feeling that something was not quite right in the world, that things were outside of his control, that he needed to help in some way but didn't know how.

I know that if he was still with us today, this current situation of lockdown, the young and old dying, alongside messages to keep safe would be playing havoc with his sense of well-being.

There are, of course, many reasons why a person can become tearful, including UTIs and other infections - and these need to be ruled out. In my husband's case, when all checks on general health had been made, a very low dose of sertraline (an anti-depressant) was eventually prescribed and it quickly returned him to his normal, happy, smiley self and he enjoyed life again.
 

tryingmybest

Registered User
May 22, 2015
644
My Mum has been the same for 3 years. Taking her out everyday for drive in the car for lunch, a garden centre, concert or somewhere was the only time she would stop, and now we can't do that due to the current crisis. I am now wheeling her in her wheelchair up the road to the river and back so she gets some fresh air and to break up the day, but it takes all of 15 minutes as we live very isolated. I've asked the GP so many times about this and they say it's just part of the vascular dementia, although last year, they did put her on Mirtazapine, but that's helped more with her sleep, than overall mood to be honest, although helped a bit at the start. Maybe ask the GP for an antidepressent for her.?It's very upsetting I know to live with and see someone like this all day long.
 

Ferrit44

Registered User
Apr 1, 2020
18
76
Liverpool
My Mum has been the same for 3 years. Taking her out everyday for drive in the car for lunch, a garden centre, concert or somewhere was the only time she would stop, and now we can't do that due to the current crisis. I am now wheeling her in her wheelchair up the road to the river and back so she gets some fresh air and to break up the day, but it takes all of 15 minutes as we live very isolated. I've asked the GP so many times about this and they say it's just part of the vascular dementia, although last year, they did put her on Mirtazapine, but that's helped more with her sleep, than overall mood to be honest, although helped a bit at the start. Maybe ask the GP for an antidepressent for her.?It's very upsetting I know to live with and see someone like this all day long.
Hi, my goodness 3 years, I don’t know if my wife has vascular dementia because she’s steadfastly refused to see our doctor, the thought that it will continue for years fills me with dread,
 

Ferrit44

Registered User
Apr 1, 2020
18
76
Liverpool
Seeing my husband start to regularly cry was one of the most distressing things about this disease for me, because above all else I wanted him to feel loved and secure.

With my husband it was a mixture of things - a general awareness that things were not well, frustration that he could do less and less - and overwhelming sadness brought on by what he had read or seen in newspapers or on tv.

The latter two I could take charge of to some extent but there was still that underlying feeling that something was not quite right in the world, that things were outside of his control, that he needed to help in some way but didn't know how.

I know that if he was still with us today, this current situation of lockdown, the young and old dying, alongside messages to keep safe would be playing havoc with his sense of well-being.

There are, of course, many reasons why a person can become tearful, including UTIs and other infections - and these need to be ruled out. In my husband's case, when all checks on general health had been made, a very low dose of sertraline (an anti-depressant) was eventually prescribed and it quickly returned him to his normal, happy, smiley self and he enjoyed life again.
Hi, our doctor prescribed sertraline for me after our daughter spoke to him, I’m hoping it will help me to cope, but as I say my wife refuses to talk to the doctor.