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Consent for operation

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
11,676
South coast
I have just discovered that mum has been listed for a cataract operation and no-one told me anything about it. I have just discovered that she is having it done this week! Im pretty peeved to say the least.
My main question is, however - does anyone know who signs the consent form given that she has lost capacity and I have CoP for finances only?
 

jeany123

Registered User
Mar 24, 2012
19,036
70
Durham
When my husband who has dementia was going to have a cataract operation I was told by the specialist that it was up to the specialist to decide whether it should go ahead and I had no say,
 
Last edited:

nitram

Registered User
Apr 6, 2011
19,932
North Manchester
Mental health conditions
Under the Mental Health Act (1983), people with certain mental health conditions – such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or dementia – can be compulsorily detained and treated at a hospital or psychiatric clinic without their consent, if deemed necessary.
If the person lacks capacity (the ability to understand information and use it to make a decision) and has not previously expressed their wishes, their mental health condition may be treated without consent, as may any related conditions, such as those resulting from self-harm. However, unrelated physical conditions cannot be treated without consent.
An advance decision prohibiting certain types of treatment can be overruled if a person is being held under the 1983 Act, even if they made the original decision when they were capable.

http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Consent-to-treatment/Pages/How-does-it-work.aspx

How essential is the operation?
What is the likelihood that your mum would pull the eye patch off and scratch at the eye?
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
11,676
South coast
How essential is the operation?
What is the likelihood that your mum would pull the eye patch off and scratch at the eye?
Indeed
Actually Im more concerned about the actual operation itself. Im not sure she will be able to keep still that long and Im hoping that they are going to do it under sedation.
She doesnt see very well now - I think that she has quite dense cataracts and she does regularly say - "I wish I could see better", but I am somewhat apprehensive.

Does the bit you quoted mean that no-one is able to sign consent in her circumstances?
 

jenniferpa

Registered User
Jun 27, 2006
39,448
Does the bit you quoted mean that no-one is able to sign consent in her circumstances?
My link indicates that she might be considered to have capacity to agree to the surgery, particularly as she has obviously expressed a desire to see better. If she clearly doesn't have capacity, then family should be consulted if they are available or an IMCA consulted if not.

If an adult lacks the capacity to give consent, a decision on whether to go ahead with the treatment will need to be made by the health professionals treating them. In order to make a decision, the person's "best interests" must be considered.

There are many important elements involved in trying to determine what a person's best interests are, including:

considering whether it is safe to wait until the person can give consent, if it is likely they could regain capacity at a later stage
involving the person in the decision as much as possible
trying to identify any issues the person would take into account if they were making the decision themselves, including religious or moral beliefs; these would be based on views the person expressed previously, as well as any insight close relatives or friends can offer

If a person is felt to lack capacity, and there is no one suitable to help make decisions about medical treatment, such as family members or friends, an independent mental capacity advocate (IMCA) must be consulted.
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
11,676
South coast
Ah, thanks for the clarification Jennifer - I was a bit confused.

I think I will need to speak to the surgeon on the day of the op so that she/he is aware of the situation. Mum presents extremely well and they may not realise how bad she is.
 

Not so Rosy

Registered User
Nov 30, 2013
578
A similar situation arose with my Dad but in his case it was Radiotherapy.

He had all the pre treatments checks done fine but on the day the actual treatment was due to start they refused to go ahead unless I was there to sign the consent forms.
 

Saffie

Registered User
Mar 26, 2011
22,506
Near Southampton
After the caaract operation, two different eye drops have to be inserted into the eye at regular times.
Will your mother be able to do this or will someone be available to insert them for her. It's not easy.
You only have to keep the eye covered for the day and night of the operation.
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
11,676
South coast
Thank you, not so rosy. I think they may do the same here.

After the caaract operation, two different eye drops have to be inserted into the eye at regular times.
Will your mother be able to do this or will someone be available to insert them for her. It's not easy.
You only have to keep the eye covered for the day and night of the operation.
Fortunately she is in a care home and they will put the drops in. They already know about this. :)
 

100 miles

Registered User
Apr 16, 2015
109
I hope the operation goes well. Some people are very good at 'doing what the Dr says'.

With a bit of close supervision after the operation hopefully everything should be OK. I did find my mum wandering around in the middle of the night having removed her eye patch...but we stuck it back on and all was OK. It does help being super attentive for a while.

Keeping her sight as clear as possible may make life a little less of a struggle.
 

Feline

Registered User
Oct 25, 2012
164
East Devon
Ah, thanks for the clarification Jennifer - I was a bit confused.

I think I will need to speak to the surgeon on the day of the op so that she/he is aware of the situation. Mum presents extremely well and they may not realise how bad she is.
We used to have an allocated nurse whose job in theatre was to hold the patients hand while the cataract op was done, (only takes about 15 mins if all goes well). If you ask you may be allowed in to sit with her depending on the surgeon. Hope it goes well.
 

Spamar

Registered User
Oct 5, 2013
7,070
Suffolk
Hi Feline, a long long time ago I used to be a theatre technician and have sat and held people's hand during their cataract op. Is it still done? Used to make the elderly feel much more comfortable to be in contact with someone.
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
11,676
South coast
Hi Feline, a long long time ago I used to be a theatre technician and have sat and held people's hand during their cataract op. Is it still done? Used to make the elderly feel much more comfortable to be in contact with someone.
Yes, I believe that it is still done - I do hope so, otherwise there would be no chance of mum staying still.
 

Lancashirelady

Registered User
Oct 7, 2014
110
My Mum had a skin cancer removed from the top of her head under local anaesthetic at the day surgery centre. I was dreading it but she was good as gold, apart from singing "Show me the way to go home" umpteen times while we were waiting for her turn! However, the surgeon sewed a dressing to the top of her head - and she managed to get it off the same night. She reckoned mice had been running over her head! By some miracle and with lashings of savlon it all healed up very well.