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Complaining of unbearable thirst

Nuwara

New member
Sep 3, 2021
6
0
Mum was diagnosed with Alzheimer's 2.5 years ago. I share her care with my brother who lives with her but I am with her whilst he is at work, having retired Looking at the forums there are so many issues we relate to. However I think I will start with the above thirst issue as this has been going on for a couple of months. Medically she is fine, gp cannot see any reason for her reported thirstiness. It's only in the morning and generally we get her to sip water. She constantly wants to discuss with a doctor including relatives who are doctors overseas and we have to fob her off.
Just wondered if anyone else has faced this issue and if so any tips to cope.
 

Bunpoots

Volunteer Host
Apr 1, 2016
5,773
0
Nottinghamshire
Welcome to Dementia Talking Point @Nuwara

I’ve never heard of thirst being a symptom with dementia - most people seem to struggle to get their PWD to drink enough. This must be distressing for your mum and you as well. I wonder if your mum has been mouth breathing over night and this is causing the morning thirst? I know that if I have a blocked nose my mouth is very dry when I wake.

Perhaps being sympathetic to your mum’s “problem” would help. I found that agreeing with my dad, even if he was being completely illogical, would often calm him. I used to try to use the principles in this:

 

silkiest

Registered User
Feb 9, 2017
390
0
My mum has been complaining of excessive dry mouth for years. A new GP reviewed her medication and stopped her medication for bladder irritability. He said that medications which did not cause side effects years ago can cause more problems with age. Since stopping her mouth is much better and she has actually been dry at night for 1 week as she is no longer constantly drinking.
 

Seaholly

Registered User
Oct 12, 2020
106
0
A dry mouth and brain fog are symptoms of an auto-immune condition called Sjogren's Syndrome. It can take years to diagnose because it's not especially well known. Symptoms can also include dry eyes, constipation and achy joints as well as generally feeling tired and unwell. It is most common in women over 50.
 

Grannie G

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 3, 2006
74,394
0
Kent
Hello @Nuwara

An obvious question.....has your mum been tested for diabetes? An unbearable thirst is one of the symptoms.
 

Kerbie69

New member
Sep 9, 2021
3
0
My mum also complains of a dry mouth and our doctor told us that some Dementia medications can cause a dry mouth and advised us to buy salvia sprays from the chemist. This seems to have helped mum.
 

Scarlet Lady

Registered User
Apr 6, 2021
64
0
@Seaholly , you have suggested exactly what I was thinking. My mother suffered from Sjogren’s Syndrome for over 30 years before she was diagnosed. Very few people had even heard of it back then, and it was only an optician she had consulted about her dry eyes who suggested it should be followed up. Even then, knowledge and treatment was very limited. It’s an auto-immune disorder that can affect every organ in the body, at its worst. Its unfortunate that if it occurs later in life, it can easily be mistaken for ‘old Age’, as it was with my mum. Luckily, she didn’t suffer as much as some do (although according to her, no one had had to put up with such trials! )
I have a young friend in her thirties who is affected quite badly, but was diagnosed and treated because it was recognised that her symptoms were not normal for someone of her age. Sadly, I think older people still fall through the cracks.
@Nuwara , I think it’s worth mentioning to the GP, although you might come up against a brick wall because there is still a massive lack of awareness out there.
 

Seaholly

Registered User
Oct 12, 2020
106
0
It took me 20 years to get a diagnosis! Your immune cells go rogue and attack all the bits of your body that produce essential moisture and lubrication. Excessive thirst, dry mouth, dry eyes, brain fog, faecal impaction, achy joints, scabs up your nose, sinus trouble, chest pain etc., are all seen by many GPs as discrete entities, so they don't 'join the dots' and see the bigger picture.

It's still something so few people are aware of, but the Sjogren's Association has a fact sheet for medical professionals and the Versus Arthritis website also has a checklist of symptoms.
 

Nuwara

New member
Sep 3, 2021
6
0
Thank you everyone for your suggestions. Its funny that she doesnt complain every morning. Fotunately she doesnt have diabetes. The saliva spray sou ds interesting. Have left a mesage to speak to gp about appropriateness of taking somethi g called propel which is a rehydration powder. I will ask about the other things you suggest too. I do try to talk compassionately to ber about it but when she is ringing me at 5am, I do find it frustrating.
 

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