Recommended thread Compassionate Communication with the Memory Impaired

Discussion in 'Health and wellbeing' started by Grannie G, Jan 24, 2011.

  1. V1-

    V1- Registered User

    Jun 21, 2013
    10
    Essential Reading

    DON'T

    Don’t reason.
    Don’t argue.
    Don’t confront.
    Don’t remind them they forget.
    Don’t question recent memory.
    Don’t take it personally.


    DO

    Give short, one sentence explanations.
    Allow plenty of time for comprehension, then triple it.
    Repeat instructions or sentences exactly the same way.
    Eliminate 'but' from your vocabulary; substitute 'nevertheless.'
    Avoid insistence. Try again later
    Agree with them or distract them to a different subject or activity
    Accept blame when something’s wrong (even if it’s fantasy).
    Leave the room, if necessary, to avoid confrontations.
    Respond to feelings rather than words
    Be patient and cheerful and reassuring. Do go with the flow.
    Practice 100% forgiveness. Memory loss progresses daily.
    My appeal to you: Please.elevate your level of generosity and graciousness.

    SEE FULL ARTICLE

    This should be given to everyone who attends memory clinic with a relative or who is in contact with someone affected. Some of the points we've worked out on our own wasting time and causing ourselves stress and exasperation along the way - I hope not too much stress for my mother as we try to be as compassionate as possible.

    I'm going to print this and keep a copy by me, it not only gives me excellent guidance in how to manage this condition; it also reminds me that my situation is not unique. Thank you for highlighting it and reprinting it!
     
  2. Johnny.S

    Johnny.S Registered User

    Jul 1, 2013
    10
    Thank you so much for this x
     
  3. cab

    cab Registered User

    Aug 17, 2013
    47
    la la land
    just found this and have to say thank you for sharing

    i try very hard to try not to say those things sometimes though they do just come out im going to keep this so i can refer to it

    thanks again
     
  4. Tigers15

    Tigers15 Registered User

    Oct 21, 2012
    238
    Thank you. Thankfully I've been doing more of the do's and since diagnosis the don'ts have just about been eradicated. Always good to be reminded. thank you and I will try to source that book

    Shame i can't say the same about my sister who spends her time trying to reason with dad. e.g. "How could you possibly be a young man when you have daughters in their 50s and think about - you know your mum can't possibly still be alive you are 88"
     
  5. Grumpy Gramps

    Grumpy Gramps Registered User

    Oct 30, 2012
    175
    West Yorkshire
    Thanks for this GG, will try to read it regularly.xoxo
     
  6. outofsorts

    outofsorts Registered User

    Aug 27, 2013
    4
    So helpful!!!

    Some days my tolerance level is better than other days. SHAME ON ME! Thanks for sharing and reiterating what I think I already knew - - just need to make sure I stay on top of my reactions!
     
  7. barbaramanson

    barbaramanson Registered User

    Aug 26, 2013
    0
    Louisiana
    Many thanks

    I keep reading and ALL the points are helpful! So sorry for those going through and taking care of family/friends but thanks for your help.
     
  8. starryuk

    starryuk Registered User

    Nov 8, 2012
    1,300
    I have just been reminded of this via another thread, so I am bumping it up. Think I need to re-read on a regular basis. :D
     
  9. Den01

    Den01 Registered User

    Jul 16, 2013
    7
    Wish I had spotted this earlier. Den01
     
  10. Varandas

    Varandas Registered User

    Sep 2, 2013
    227
    Hampshire England
    Thank you GG.
    This is my bed time reading and I have quick reminders around the house.
    It is a tall order but so worthy!
     
  11. Concerned_Son

    Concerned_Son Registered User

    Dec 11, 2013
    15
    West Sussex
    Thanks to Grannie G for the opening post, I've found this very helpful, as it seems have many others, and will certainly be taking on-board these suggestions.

    Perhaps this thread should be made a 'sticky thread', so it remains at the top of the front page in this forum?
     
  12. Tinytim

    Tinytim Registered User

    Dec 21, 2013
    27
    Weve been married 50yrs its hard to try and talk to the man you love differently i keep forgetting i will admit and it cause rows im hoping i can do better but the dementia he has is lewybody and they rapidly regress back to when there young and i will be honest he wasntvvery pleasent then but he was mellowing as we got older and then this awful disease comes along with parkinsons

    Sent from my GT-N7000 using Talking Point mobile app
     
  13. Lovleemummy

    Lovleemummy Registered User

    Jun 13, 2013
    77
    Stoke-on-Trent
    Thought I'd comment on this to bring to the front of page.
    Such simple suggestions but so true.
    Hubby has lost most of his speech (can always remember swear words though!!!) so giving simple instructions may help.
    Will let you know how things go. Need all the help I can get.
     
  14. Lovleemummy

    Lovleemummy Registered User

    Jun 13, 2013
    77
    Stoke-on-Trent
    Should have put this on before see above thanks from LovLeeMummy.

    Compassionate Communication with the Memory Impaired
    The following piece was posted a while ago on TP and made a big impression on me. It is something I have referred to time after time and tried hard to follow.

    We have many new members who may not have seen it before. Yesterday I posted it on another Thread but thought it might be helpful if it had a Thread of it`s own.

    It`s a tall order but an excellent guideline.


    Compassionate Communication with the Memory Impaired

    by Liz Ayres
    A Volunteer of the Alzheimer's Association and Former Caregiver

    DON'T
    Don’t reason.
    Don’t argue.
    Don’t confront.
    Don’t remind them they forget.
    Don’t question recent memory.
    Don’t take it personally.



    DO
    Give short, one sentence explanations.
    Allow plenty of time for comprehension, then triple it.
    Repeat instructions or sentences exactly the same way.
    Eliminate 'but' from your vocabulary; substitute 'nevertheless.'
    Avoid insistence. Try again later
    Agree with them or distract them to a different subject or activity
    Accept blame when something’s wrong (even if it’s fantasy).
    Leave the room, if necessary, to avoid confrontations.
    Respond to feelings rather than words
    Be patient and cheerful and reassuring. Do go with the flow.
    Practice 100% forgiveness. Memory loss progresses daily.
    My appeal to you: Please.elevate your level of generosity and graciousness.



    Remember

    You can’t control memory loss, only your reaction to it. Compassionate communication will significantly heighten quality of life.

    They are not crazy or lazy. They say normal things, and do normal things, for a memory impaired, dementia individual. If they were deliberately trying to exasperate you, they would have a different diagnosis. Forgive them ... always. For example: they don’t hide things; they protect them in safe places... And then forget. Don’t take ‘stealing’ accusations personally.

    Their disability is memory loss. Asking them to remember is like asking a blind person to read. (“Did you take your pills?” “What did you do today?”) Don’t ask and don’t test memory! A loss of this magnitude reduces the capacity to reason. Expecting them to be reasonable or to accept your conclusion is unrealistic. (“You need a shower.” “Day care will be fun.” “You can’t live alone.”) Don’t try to reason or convince them. Give a one sentence explanation or search for creative solutions. Memory loss produces unpredictable emotions, thought, and behavior, which you can alleviate by resolving all issues peacefully. Don’t argue, correct, contradict, confront, blame, or insist.

    Reminders are rarely kind. They tell the patient how disabled they are – over and over again. Reminders of the recent past imply, “I remember, I’m okay; you don’t, you’re not. ”Ouch! Refer to the present or the future. (If they’re hungry, don’t inform them they ate an hour ago, offer a snack or set a time to eat soon.) They may ask the same question repeatedly, believing each time is the first. Graciously respond as if it’s the first time. Some days may seem normal, but they are not. They live in a different reality. Reminders won’t bring them into yours. Note: For vascular dementia, giving clues may help their recall. If it doesn’t work, be kind ... don’t remind.

    Ethical dilemmas may occur. If, for instance, the patient thinks a dead spouse is alive, and truthful reminders will create sadness, what should you do? To avoid distress, try these ways of kindness: 1) distract to another topic, or 2) start a fun activity, or 3) reminisce about their spouse, “I was just thinking about ______. How did you two meet?” You might even try, “He’s gone for a while. Let’s take our walk now.”

    Open-ended questions (“Where shall we go?” “What do you want to eat/wear/do?”) are surprisingly complex and create anxiety. Give them a simple choice between two items or direct their choice, “You look great in the red blouse.”

    They are scared all the time. Each patient reacts differently to fear. They may become passive, uncooperative, hostile, angry, agitated, verbally abusive, or physically combative. They may even do them all at different times, or alternate between them. Anxiety may compel them to shadow you (follow everywhere). Anxiety compels them to resist changes in routine, even pleasant ones. Your goal is to reduce anxiety whenever possible. Also, they can’t remember your reassurances. Keep saying them.

    Examples

    Don’t reason

    Patient What doctor’s appointment? There’s nothing wrong with me.”
    Don’t (reason) “You’ve been seeing the doctor every three months for the last two years. It’s written on the calendar and I told you about it yesterday and this morning.”
    DO (short explanation) “It’s just a regular check-up.”
    (accept blame) “I’m sorry if I forgot to tell you.”

    Don’t argue

    Patient “I didn’t write this check for $500. Someone at the bank is forging my signature.”
    Don’t (argue) “What? Don’t be silly! The bank wouldn’t be forging your signature.”
    DO (respond to feelings) “That’s a scary thought.”
    (reassure) “I’ll make sure they don’t do that.”
    (distract) “Would you help me fold the towels?”

    Don’t confront
    Patient “Nobody’s going to make decisions for me. You can go now ... and don’t come back!”
    Don’t (confront) I’m not going anywhere and you can’t remember enough to make your own decisions.”
    DO (accept blame or respond to feelings) “I’m sorry this is a tough time.”
    (reassure) “I love you and we’re going to get through this together.”
    (distract) “You know what? Don has a new job. He’s really excited about it.


    Don’t remind them they forget
    Patient: “Joe hasn’t called for a long time. I hope he’s okay.”
    Don’t (remind) “Joe called yesterday and you talked to him for 15 minutes.”
    DO (reassure) “You really like talking to Joe, don’t you?”
    (distract) “Let’s call him when we get back from our walk.”



    Don’t question recent memory

    Patient “Hello, Mary. I see you’ve brought a friend with you.”
    Don’t (question memory) “Hi, Mom. You remember Eric, don’t you? What did you do today?”
    DO (short explanation) “Hi, Mom. You look wonderful! This is Eric. We work together.”



    Don’t take it personally!

    Patient “Who are you? Where’s my husband?”
    Don’t (take it personally) “What do you mean – who’s your husband? I am!”
    DO (go with the flow, reassure) “He’ll be here for dinner.”
    (distract) “How about some milk and cookies?” .. Would you like chocolate chip or oatmeal?



    Do repeat exactly

    Patient "I'm going to the store for a newspaper."
    Don’t (repeat differently) "Please put you shoes on."
    "You'll need to put your shoes on."
    DO (repeat exactly) "Please put your shoes on."
    "Please put your shoes on."



    Do eliminate "but", substitute "nevertheless"
    Patient "I'm not eating this. I hate chicken."
    Don’t (say "but") "I know chicken's not your favorite food, but it's what we're having for dinner."
    DO (say "nevertheless") "I know chicken's not your favorite food, (smile) nevertheless I'd appreciate it if you'd eat a little bit."

    Used with permission from Ellen Warner at Ageless Design
    __________________
    __________________

    As per requests from members: the original source of this information is here

    http://www.agelessdesign.com/Library/InfoManage/Zoom.asp?InfoID=296&RedirectPath=Add1&FolderID=104 &SessionID={F6D6DF4E-D924-452C-9E03-21D0E8CA0183}&InfoGroup=Main&InfoType=Article&SP=2
     
  15. Raffles

    Raffles Registered User

    Nov 8, 2008
    97
    North Wales
    Saints

    I think if you can live by what this Compassionate Communication says you must all be Saints. I find it impossible.
     
  16. Izzy

    Izzy Volunteer Moderator

    Aug 31, 2003
    59,942
    Female
    Dundee
    #216 Izzy, Feb 9, 2014
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2014
    I know how you feel Raffles.


    Sent from my iPhone using Talking Point mobile app
     
  17. jaymor

    jaymor Volunteer Moderator

    Jul 14, 2006
    12,557
    Female
    England
    I am far from a saint but found it got easier over time.

    It was so much easier for me to go with the flow than keep correcting. It caused arguments, anxiety and aggression . The last two years my husband was at home he did not recognise me as his wife or our home of 47 years as his home. If I had tried to correct him all day, everyday that I was me and the house we were in was home, No. 1, I would have gone insane and No. 2, he would have been beyond control and in the nursing home far sooner than he was. I have had 8 years practice.

    Some days I am his sister or his mother or even his aunt or grandmother. I just take on the role and he is content, just how would he be if I was to continually tell him all four of his relatives are long since dead and gone.

    It is almost like second nature now and with all the white lies that trip of my tongue, may be my morals could be questioned but I am doing it for my husband and for me that gives me absolution.

    You are right it is not easy and we manage as best we can, I have fallen by the wayside so often my knees are skinless.

    Jay






    Sent from my iPad using Talking Point mobile app
     
  18. Kijo

    Kijo Registered User

    Feb 9, 2014
    31
    Going to Print this to remind myself

    As a new member near the beginning of this journey, I know this advice will become more and more valuable. Already I can see where I can start changing how I react or word my responses. Thank you.
     
  19. NanLorac

    NanLorac Registered User

    May 14, 2012
    686
    Female
    Scotland
  20. Saffie

    Saffie Registered User

    Mar 26, 2011
    22,499
    Female
    Near Southampton
    That looks much better NanLorac, thanks. Nice and neat and concise.
    The link given in post 215 above doesn't work on my internet.
     

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