1. needsomecake

    needsomecake Registered User

    Apr 12, 2008
    10
    I am generally very happy with the nursing home my dad is living in. It had a really nice 'feel' as soon as we walked in the door and the staff are very caring and have a good relationship with the residents.

    His room is brilliant as it is on the way to the kitchen so a lot of staff will say hello or have a brief chat when passing his door which used to be wedged open.

    Unfortunately there was a fire in another residents room (noone hurt, swiftly dealt with) but now all doors have to be kept shut. Dad spends most of his time in bed, or occaisionaly in his recliner but he now seems very isolated and as he gets anxious when he is on his own I can't think this is a good situation. He's more than capable of yelling out when he needs something (and when he doesn't!) but doesn't use the call button. So he relies on either someone being around when he is shouting out or waiting until the staff come to his room specifically.

    I'm not sure there are any solutions but it has been bugging me for a while. Does anyone have any thoughts?
     
  2. Amy

    Amy Registered User

    Jan 4, 2006
    3,453
    Hiya Needsomecake,
    Similar thing happened in Mum,s home after they had had fire inspection.....wasnt long till door were wedged open again...have you talked to the staff....they may be prepared to overlook it being just slightly ajar....tell them your concerns about dad being isolated.....or what about a baby monitor being plugged in....so someone can hear dad if he calls out...just an idea.
    Love Helen
     
  3. Sweet Pea

    Sweet Pea Registered User

    Dec 20, 2006
    24
    North Yorkshire
    There are fire door where I work. The majority of them remain closed, but there are some where it is more useful if they are kept open (the receprion area for example). These doors are 'propped' open with special devices that have a magnet that marries up to another magnet on the door. These doors automatically close if the fire alarm is activated. I'm sorry that I don't know the name of these devices (perhaps someone else will be able to help)but they may be helpful for your Dad. The only thing is that when the door is closed, the 'stay' remains sticking up from the floor which may be a tripping hazzard? Just thinking out load now, but it's something for you to think about

    Sweet Pea
     
  4. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    Hi Needsomecake (don't we all?)

    John also spends his time between his bed and his recliner. Once they've got him into his recliner (with stand-aid), they wheel him in it up to the lounge. It's hard work, it's quite heavy to move, but they manage.

    He doesn't speak at all, but when he's awake his eyes follow people about, and he sometimes responds when people talk to him, so he's at least getting some stimulation.

    He's up for mealtimes, and is put back to bed for the afternoon. Only because he has tissue viability issues, he can sleep quite comfortably in his chair, and isn't disturbed by other residents shouting out.

    Would this be possible for your dad? Much as I like the privacy of his own room, I think the stimulation is good for John.
     
  5. needsomecake

    needsomecake Registered User

    Apr 12, 2008
    10
    Thanks all for your thoughts :)

    Sweet Pea, I know the gadget you mean and in an ideal world they would have them in the nursing home. However, chances of this are small as I imagine it would cost a fair bit to sort out a 35 bedroom home...I will ask though, It will be interesting to see how long the new regime is kept up.

    Dad used to spend a lot of his time in the lounges but he's still poorly after a spell in hospital. The trouble is, he always wants to be in bed, and slips out of chairs very easily - even his recliner, which is much more of an issue if the staff can't see him. So by his preference and for his safety he spends most of his time in bed. He always has the TV on but I'm not sure how much he watches it these days.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.