1. Dunroamin

    Dunroamin Registered User

    May 5, 2019
    14
    I was diagnosed with Alzheimers in February this year. I have accepted my diagnosis and am going about ;life positively. However, I would like to know if those of you of experience of loved ones with dementia find they are increasingly intolerant of noise and people chattering non stop?
     
  2. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    9,881
    Female
    South coast
    Yes, my OH gets stimulus overload so noises seem too loud, light seems too bright and he cant cope with lots of people or things going on.

    When he feels like that he retreats to our conservatory where it is quiet and peaceful. I make sure that he doesnt go anywhere which is too loud or busy.
     
  3. Glokta

    Glokta Registered User

    Jul 22, 2019
    29
    If you are anxious about your diagnosis you could be finding that background noise makes it worse. This is because you are mentally searching for the “threat”, and the background noise interferes with the search process, the threat in this case, of course, is an internal worry, and therefore cannot be avoided. Some types of antidepressants can help with this. Talk to your GP about it. I’m sorry you have this diagnosis, I cannot imagine what it would be like, but it can affect anyone, so no one is safe. Xxx
     
  4. Palerider

    Palerider Registered User

    Aug 9, 2015
    444
    Male
    North West

    Yes its quite common, mum is the same she finds background noise very intrusive. I have to be careful where I take her if we go for coffee and cake. As Canary says keeping things low key helps. We usually visit a quite Costa out of the way and avoid busy areas.
     
  5. LynneMcV

    LynneMcV Volunteer Moderator

    May 9, 2012
    3,459
    south-east London
    Yes, my husband also became quite intolerant of constant chatter and background noise - he found it hard to think straight and communicate in that kind of atmosphere.

    We learnt to seek out quieter locations at quieter times when out and about - but it was easier to control background noise within the home for the most part.

    A few months ago I took part in a 'Virtual Dementia' event aimed at giving people a clearer insight into what a person with a dementia diagnosis can often be experiencing. One of the methods was to have to listen to constant background noise being played via headphones while trying to follow instructions and conversations - it really was quite overwhelming at times and I certainly came to understand the irritability that my husband had felt.
     
  6. Dunroamin

    Dunroamin Registered User

    May 5, 2019
    14
    Thank you all for taking the time to post. Its a new development for me and most annoying. I have decided on a two prong attack. Avoiding noisy places whenever possible and when the unavoidable person(s) with inane chatter are around, to switch off the hearing aids. Being a pragmatist I have also arranged for the audiologist to retune more background noise out of my aids and have an appointment for that.
     
  7. HENRYT

    HENRYT Registered User

    Sep 1, 2016
    2
    I did the same as Lynne and took a virtual dementia class, the findings were for me a real eye opener. I think that as things progress there is a sense of sensory overload especially in the hearing sense. I kind of liken it to if you have tinnitus. My dad has had dementia for 5 years and he hears the proverbial pin drop. His eyesight not so good so I guess the body compensates by increasing other still functioning senses. His taste has also gotten very sensitive. For those of us in a support role I would highly recommend taking the virtual dementia course as it really helps you understand what your loved one is going through and helps you support better. Best of luck Dunroamin
     
  8. barbie61

    barbie61 New member

    Aug 12, 2019
    1

    This is fascinating and has given me such an insight to what Mum is feeling - please can you tell me where you found the Virtual Dementia event?
     
  9. lostboy

    lostboy New member

    Jan 9, 2018
    3
     
  10. lostboy

    lostboy New member

    Jan 9, 2018
    3
    Hi,
    I am so sorry to hear this but my experience comes from my partner who hates noise and although he was in a care home where you would expect them to understand this I am sad to say they didn't. It upset him and me. I moved him for other reasons. He justs wants peace and quiet and now not even the TV or radio. My thoughts are with you.
     
  11. Cat27

    Cat27 Volunteer Moderator

    Feb 27, 2015
    10,066
    Merseyside
    Welcome to DTP @barbie61
    I’m sure @LynneMcV will answer soon.
    Please keep posting as you’ll get lots of support here.
     
  12. grpop

    grpop Registered User

    Nov 17, 2016
    2
    My wife has these symptoms too. If anyone comes to see me, she will say, oh stop chattering and making a noise. I have to have the volume of the TV down to barely au
     
  13. Cat27

    Cat27 Volunteer Moderator

    Feb 27, 2015
    10,066
    Merseyside
    Welcome to DTP @grpop.
    Please keep posting as you’ll get lots of support here.
     
  14. grpop

    grpop Registered User

    Nov 17, 2016
    2
    My wife has these symptoms. If anyone comes to see me, she says, oh stop chattering and making a noise. I have to have the volume of the TV down to barely audible and she can't tolerate any household appliances running when she has gone to bed, even though that's the other end of the house
     
  15. LynneMcV

    LynneMcV Volunteer Moderator

    May 9, 2012
    3,459
    south-east London
    Hi @barbie61 and welcome to DTP.
    I was lucky enough to experience the tour when my employers organised for the mobile virtual tour unit to visit our work premises.

    The virtual tour is available across the uk, visiting workplaces, colleges, shopping centres, libraries, hospitals, care centres and other key locations. It might be worth contacting your local authority in the first instance to see if they have anything planned - or if they would consider hosting something local to you.

    It's certainly worth attending, if you get the chance.
     
  16. shartyrr

    shartyrr Registered User

    Apr 29, 2016
    1
    Sadly I can relate to this. When my husband gets up in the morning he prefers no noise and no lights. Have to admit it drives me crazy. He used to, when napping, if I try to watch tv come charging out of the bedroom because it was too loud. I try turning it down but then I can’t hear it. I think the quiet and the dark makes me lonely. All I hear is he needs to get out and do things in order for things not to get worse. I know that isn’t going to happen. I have always hosted Thanksgiving and Christmas here for my rather large family and I just don’t know how I am going to handle it this year. I need the interaction myself. Groan !
     

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