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Changes

lvplbrian

Registered User
Mar 12, 2014
20
0
Am making subtle changes to the days routine etc. My partner seems calmer if I leave the radio on and music is relieving a lot of his anxiety. I have found visual stimulation by the television somehow overloads his system. Does this make sense to people. Have noticed changes and anything out of the normal seem to raise his anxiety and he needs reassurance about the simplest thing. Managed to get our wills witnessed at last its only taken 6months but now its done another positive. I must try something to be thankful about on a daily basis "Life is good and no one can take my dreams".
Brian:)
 

Noorza

Registered User
Jun 8, 2012
6,542
0
I can only relate in terms of autism which I know about due to talking to many specialists over the years for my son. They describe the signals coming into the brain like radio waves but if they try to use audio as well as visual the waves get interrupted. Not for all autistic people but for some, same as with dementia it affects people differently.

But TV v Radio I understand how that could happen, my son was regularly in trouble for not looking at the teachers but if he looked the waves got fuddled and he couldn't hear. The teacher's didn't realise that if he was looking at them, he wasn't listening to them so would test him by asking him to relate what had just been taught and he could always answer.

The teacher's who didn't "get" autism didn't understand how he did it. :D

The answer for us was given again by a specialist so he had to look at the teacher's earlobes to appear he was looking at their face and mouth movements but he wasn't. So yes I can see that a television could be overwhelming while a radio relaxing.

Good for you working it out as it can be so hit and miss.
 

Grannie G

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 3, 2006
76,326
0
Kent
Hello Brian

My husband was soothed by music and I had to censor TV programmes.

He was disturbed by violence on the news, or in drama, thinking he was a part of it, and he couldn`t always follow the language so I didn`t leave him alone to watch television.

He loved DVDs of his favourite music, whether it was an orchestra or his favourite Andrea Bocelli.

It really is a case of trial and error and it sounds as if you are doing well. :)
 

LYN T

Registered User
Aug 30, 2012
6,958
0
Brixham Devon
My husband was soothed by music and I had to censor TV programmes.

He was disturbed by violence on the news, or in drama, thinking he was a part of it, and he couldn`t always follow the language so I didn`t leave him alone to watch television.

He loved DVDs of his favourite music, whether it was an orchestra or his favourite Andrea Bocelli.

It really is a case of trial and error and it sounds as if you are doing well. :)

Same with Pete-he always thought the people on the TV were talking to him, so anything to do with violence he thought was directed at him. Music used to work but now he gets agitated at that also

Take care

Lyn T
 

pamann

Registered User
Oct 28, 2013
2,635
0
Kent
I had to turn the tv off when my husband was watching The Cube he thought Phil Scolfield wanted him to go into the cube but kept saying l can't do it, he got so angry l had to stop him puttung his fist though the screen, he went in the kitchen crying, he loves the tv as he talks to everyone loves the news readers, l don't think he understands much what's going on now with news.

Sent from my GT-P5210 using Talking Point mobile app
 

Shedrech

Volunteer Moderator
Dec 15, 2012
12,473
0
Yorkshire
Yes my dad is very much the same currently. We had a day yesterday of all of what you describe. I thought he'd love watching Tommy Walsh's DIY programme as he had been an avid DIYer in the past - no; he thought he was one of the crew and Tommy was telling him to do things but he didn't understand how, why or what. So much so that he couldn't then recognise his lunch, didn't know what to do with his hot cross bun so became anxious and shirty. Luckily he loves jazz and I have recently bought loads of CDs to play, though I've noticed the more avant garde and quick tempo ones can agitate him (and me to be honest).
He has a smart TV and I'm wondering about using the Y..T..e app as he's enjoyed watching/listening to orchestras play eg the proms - or the links to past TV he has enjoyed but which so far haven't set him off eg Michael Portillo and his train rides. Could you try something similar?
He hadn't had a shower for a week so suggested one before tea - he has done this before but does usually have a shower in the morning. Seemed OK, had shower went to bedroom to get dried and into his pyjamas. Silence. I asked if he was OK - no. He couldn't work out how to fasten his buttons as there was a spare one with no button hole and that thoroughly confused him. Then it seemed as though a switch had been turned on (or off) and he was lost - it must be morning because he was in pyjamas and had a shower, so tea couldn't be tea it had to be breakfast. If it was tea then he'd lost a whole day and how could that happen. I took him through what we'd done that day and he listened but immediately went back to everything was wrong. He got upset and nasty. All I could do was to sit quietly and let him calm eventually and eat his tea with a sour look on his face. Then I found Last of the Summer Wine was on one channel and left him with a coffee to watch - to hear him laughing to it as I did the washing up. Thank goodness.
I do have some routines - and he's got his own compulsions eg spending ages putting the towel back on the rail just so - but the problem is he can decide any moment that he has never done something that way or always done it this way - and I now heartily dislike the words 'should' and 'must' - when he uses them I know I'm on to a loser.
Sorry for the long reply - your post struck a chord - and yes there was a bright moment = buying some plants for the front garden and he actually did chose some himself.
 

steviep

Registered User
Dec 11, 2012
149
0
Lancashire
Mum thinks people on the TV are talking to her and watching her.

We try to explain to her that they can't actually see or hear her but she refuses to believe us and she gets very agitated at times.

I'll try swithcing the TV off for a while today and see if it makes any difference to how she interacts with us.

I don't know if others have noticed the same, but she seems to be very aware of everything around her and picks up on things that we perhaps don't particularly notice - from the TV or conversations either within the room or from people talking or things going on in the corridor - but she just can't seem to assimilate them into reality.

Perhaps dementia is related to autism in some way with audio and visual waves getting mixed and muddled in the brain?
 

lilysmybabypup

Registered User
May 21, 2012
1,263
0
Sydney, Australia
Am making subtle changes to the days routine etc. My partner seems calmer if I leave the radio on and music is relieving a lot of his anxiety. I have found visual stimulation by the television somehow overloads his system. Does this make sense to people. Have noticed changes and anything out of the normal seem to raise his anxiety and he needs reassurance about the simplest thing. Managed to get our wills witnessed at last its only taken 6months but now its done another positive. I must try something to be thankful about on a daily basis "Life is good and no one can take my dreams".
Brian:)

Music is a well-documented assistance for people with dementia. It can not only calm them but also stimulate parts of the brain, such that people have been known to sing along to known songs even if they rarely speak.

For my father, who had Alzheimer's, it was used for his enjoyment, and also to create a familiarity of daily routines. Every time I went to shower him I would pop the same cd on, and then suggest I help him to shower. I bought him cd's of music he had as records, and had loved during the 60's and 70's. He was a great whistler rather than singer, and he would whistle along with the music without skipping a beat. When his shower was all done, we would come back out to the kitchen together and dance together to the song playing at that time. It was usually Sentimental Journey since his shower took about the same time to complete. Dad has since passed, but those songs evoke very strong memories for me now. That one is particularly dear.

Keeping routines seemed to give him security and also made him less resistant, since we would simply say, "You know, we always do this at this time," and he would agree, even though he probably wasn't aware.

Mum had to stop watching the news because it distressed him so much to hear of violence or calamity. He did enjoy nature programs greatly, as long as they were cute and cuddly, not the stalk and kill variety. She also watched some quiz shows and it was a good time for me to sit and watch with Dad and engage in the questions, but I was very careful to not put him on the spot and make him feel inadequate or embarrassed. Sometimes pure conversation was difficult, but something like watching these shows or reading to him made chit chat easier.

Your attitude is great, and the best for keeping life on an even keel. Getting things such as wills ticked off the to-do list will make the future simpler and trouble-free. You sound like you're doing a wonderful job.

Stephanie
 
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