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Ceiling hoists - any views?

stanleypj

Registered User
Dec 8, 2011
10,708
North West
I know that they are expensive. Leave that aside for one moment. I'm interested in finding out about them because even the most ardent hoisters say that they can be safely operated by one person, as opposed to any other type of hoist.

I hate the fact that I can do very little in the way of moving and handling on my own now (I could probably do it, but the repeated cautions have got to me and I'd feel really bad if either of us came to any harm).

I'm interested in hearing from anyone with experience of them.

Thanks.
 

bemused1

Registered User
Mar 4, 2012
3,402
I have one for husband and yes they are perfectly well operated by one person . My husband weighs something around 18st and I am 63 with arthritis in both knees and neck but I can use it just fine. The only slight problem I have is turning him to get the sling on because he is dead Weight. If I can you can.
We paid just over £1000 for ours which is h shaped. Then you have to factor in slings although those were paid fro by others. You also have to include service costs because by law lifting devices have to be kept serviced.
Me I am very ardent, if it wasn't for it I would have my house full of carers we don't want.
Any more help, you know where I am
 

stanleypj

Registered User
Dec 8, 2011
10,708
North West
Many thanks as ever Bemused. Hadn't registered yours was a ceiling hoist. The cost doesn't sound too bad considering how often it would be in use. We already have the council loaned mobile so I'm pretty sure we'd have to pay for the ceiling one.
 

susanh13

Registered User
Oct 23, 2013
17
Hi, yes I would recommend a ceiling hoist. We had a behind the bed hoist supplied by social services but it was very limiting. Mum didn't like it as it swung about too much. We went on holiday to an adapted cottage with a ceiling hoist and she was so much better. Social services wouldn't pay so I went ahead and purchased one privately for the bedroom and lounge. We have not looked back. They are operated singularly be one carer safely. Have had it for a year now and wished had go it earlier. My advice is go for it.
 

Padraig

Registered User
Dec 10, 2009
1,039
Hereford
When I removed my wife from a Nursing Home against advice she was bedridden, we were issued with a hoist, one that moved on wheel. It was the one piece of equipment I didn't pay for.
As my wife was then so very light, about 5 and a half stone, and suffered with pressure sore I chose to put the hoist in the garage. When her condition improved I began to use the hoist. It was quite simple to use as I raised her from bed to commode, to wheel her into the wet room for her daily tooth brush and shower.
Over the final four and a half years of her life I used the hoist daily, I was in my seventies then. Fortunately she gained a little less than three more stone, so I was capable of lifting her in and out of the car from her wheelchair.

Sorry if this is of no help as I'm aware each situation is different, just to say I found it possible.
 

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