1. Expert Q&A: Protecting a person with dementia from financial abuse - Weds 26 June, 3:30-4:30 pm

    Financial abuse can have serious consequences for a person with dementia. Find out how to protect a person with dementia from financial abuse.

    Sam, our Knowledge Officer (Legal and Welfare Rights) is our expert on this topic. She will be here to answer your questions on Wednesday 26 June between 3:30 - 4:30 pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

  1. lorryman

    lorryman Registered User

    Dec 23, 2014
    6
    Spalding area
    Having first carers assessment since pam diagnosed with vasc. dem. on Monday, have had carers assesments before wife had dementia diagnosed because of her other health probs. We presently get no outside help, I am her full time carer (I retired june 2014,) I am 62, on carers allowance pam on state pension and DLA middle rate, I have very small private pension, advice on best way forward with carers ass. on Monday would be welcome, I am sure there are carers out there with more exp. than I,thankyou in advance.
     
  2. Beate

    Beate Registered User

    May 21, 2014
    11,489
    Female
    London
    You need to tell them exactly what your personal situation is like. What are you struggling with and what would make your life easier? What is it you want - day centre, befriending service, carers, respite? If you don't ask you don't get. They can also refer you to telecare for gadgets and an OT for stuff around the house like grab rails. Unfortunately every borough has their own rules on what they can give you and how much you'd have to pay for it, and sometimes you have to shout very loudly to get the help you deserve.

    Good luck.
     
  3. esmeralda

    esmeralda Registered User

    Nov 27, 2014
    3,072
    Devon
    My own experience of the Carer's assessment was fairly superficial lorryman, but things seem to vary a lot between different LA's. Presumably they all have to use the same form though. I would say think about your situation and just what help you need, including respite, before you go for the assessment.

    As I say all LA's seem to be different but as far as the financial assessment goes here, they base it on the partner who has the smallest income. Mobility allowance is disregarded but the Care component of DLA is taken into account. Weirdly here they agreed a care plan and started to pay an allowance to us before they did the financial assessment, then after the assessment said we would have to fund ourselves. Don't know why they didn't do the asssessment first. I think we have to be self funding because my husband has a very small private pension and the higher rate of DLA.

    Hope it all goes well for you, I'm sure other people will give you useful advice.
     
  4. fizzie

    fizzie Registered User

    Jul 20, 2011
    2,740
    I agree with all that. I would set out the stall at the beginning. Find out what they can offer first. They all have different rules and ways of dealing with it but be honest about your very worst day .
    Suggest before they come you write out a wish list of the things that would help you - it is so easy to forget once you get talking
    GL I really hope you get the help you need
     
  5. esmeralda

    esmeralda Registered User

    Nov 27, 2014
    3,072
    Devon
    PS Make sure you tell them if you have health problems of your own.
     
  6. Grey Lad

    Grey Lad Registered User

    Sep 12, 2014
    5,737
    North East Lincs
    Perhaps the flu injection would help some people. G L
     
  7. Scarlett123

    Scarlett123 Registered User

    Apr 30, 2013
    3,802
    Essex
    As others have said, you need to stress everything that impacts on your life, as it happens on "the worst day". Remember, it is the person who has the illness, who has their finances taken into account, not the carer. Unfortunately, every Local Authority is autonomous, but I would assume most of them are having to make cuts in what they can offer, and if it doesn't seem sufficient to meet your needs, you must say so. A meek or stoic acceptance doesn't get you very far.

    I hadn't had any experience of dealing with Social Workers, and I stupidly thought that we would be assigned one, and they would stay with us for as long as we needed one. My late husband had 5 different SWs in 7 months. Every time I requested an extra Day Care session, or help with dressing or undressing, even though I was paying for it, a new SW was assigned, and I had to go over everything again.

    It can be very distressing explaining everything about your spouse when they are present, and I found it helpful to type out a statement, To Whom It May Concern, detailing everything, and give it to the SW on their arrival. That way, John wasn't distressed by how I said his illness affected me. Remember, this is the carer's assessment, and sadly, many people with AD are in complete denial, and will contradict you when you detail the way their illness impacts on you.

    I wish you luck.
     
  8. Grey Lad

    Grey Lad Registered User

    Sep 12, 2014
    5,737
    North East Lincs
    Thanks for that reminder. Must update my TWIMC. It's a bit lke reviewing your C V.
     
  9. esmeralda

    esmeralda Registered User

    Nov 27, 2014
    3,072
    Devon

    It all sounds like a particularly ingenious form of torture Scarlett. I have also been amazed at how professionals will expect you to talk about difficulties in front of the PWD. Incredibly insensitive.
    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
     
  10. Scarlett123

    Scarlett123 Registered User

    Apr 30, 2013
    3,802
    Essex
    I know. :( When the first SW phoned to make an appointment, I gave her a selection of times when I knew John would be at the Day Centre. When she suggested another time, I said that I couldn't manage then, as John would be home, and I was shocked when she said that he had to be there.

    But even more shocking, was the way she asked such direct questions about him. I tried talking in riddles, but wasn't getting anywhere, so eventually, I had to describe some of his actions, and the way they affected me. John denied everything, and was becoming so distressed that I terminated the interview.

    Then I phoned the next day, arranged another appointment, that couldn't be made by the SW for about 3 weeks, but at least this time, I was prepared with my written statement. I also highlighted the fact that it was difficult, felt disloyal, and incredibly distressing for both John and I to have to listen to me saying all this. I would have thought that with all their "training", the professionals would be aware of these problems.
     

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