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Care packages

Nicola78

New member
May 9, 2020
8
0
I am currently caring for my dad in his home and he receives a care package to which he contributes. In recent months we have had to stay overnight to stop him wandering and making sure he has some kind of routine to represent day and night. At best he stays in his bedroom and uses the toilet - no midnight baking, yet. He does take comfort in knowing that either my brother or I are there. I think I read somewhere that Alzheimer patients fear being alone because they don't really understand what's happening. Anyhow, my brother has now said he won't stay over and that he's prepared for me to have an extension built on my house (which is quite nice) to house my dad (this would come out of dad's house sale). Now I know what you are thinking - he's palming dad off with an extension but I have said I won't do it unless the care package comes to my house too. So does anyone know if this can happen? can he have a care package at my house or will it be assumed as he's moving in with me that I am now on duty 24/7?
I ask this question with no disrespect for all those wonderful people who do this already. I just feel my brother should share the care and not start something he can't finish ie overnight stays. It's very unfair on my poor dad and I am unable to do 7 days.
 

Sarasa

Registered User
Apr 13, 2018
2,365
0
Hi @Nicola78 , and welcome to Dementia Talking Point. This is a wonderfully friendly and supportive community and you'll get loads of help and advice here.
Others will be along shortly who know the ins and outs of care packages better than I do, but I would have thought the package is attached to the person, not to where they live, and there are members on here that care for their loved ones full time either in the loved ones home or their own that have packages.
I would very much question the having the extension built and moving your dad in though. If you have to fund it through the sale of the house, that means your dad will be staying at yours for a few month with all the disruption of major building works. Even if you do it before he arrives there is no guarantee that he will settle in it, or stay in the extension. People with dementia want to be with other people. Also remember he's the best he is every going to be at the moment, and he could well become more difficult to care for. If he did need to go into care and all his house money had been spent on a extension that increased the value of your house I'm not sure if that would be considered deprivation of assets by the Office of the Public Guardian. Again others will know more about that.
I know now isn't the best time to be considering a move to a care home, but I think it might be in all your best interests to consider that.
 

Nicola78

New member
May 9, 2020
8
0
Thank you. Lots of information there. I would be doing a loft conversion so he would be in my house. I know what you mean about settling and this is a very serious consideration. I know he likes his own home. I feel like I should suck it up and stay with him 7 nights a week. Interesting point about the Office of Public Guardian. I look forward to hearing from others.
 

Rosettastone57

Registered User
Oct 27, 2016
1,432
0
Hi @Nicola78 ,my mother in law had a private care package in her own home for 3 years. My husband would not have considered having her with us, because she simply would have refused to stay in any extension. She wanted to be with us all the time, ringing us at all hours. We couldn't have tolerated her in the same house because she was aggressive if we visited her in her own home, when we needed to go away. Unless you have someone with your father 24 /7 you may find the situation intolerable even with carers visits. It gets to the point where constant supervision is required, usually a care home setting
 

Louise7

Registered User
Mar 25, 2016
2,754
0
Hello @Nicola78 welcome from me too. In terms of your dad's care package, you mention that he contributes towards this - is his care currently funded/provided by the local authority? If so, if your dad will have savings in excess of £23,250 (in England) when his house is sold he will be deemed a 'self funder' by the local authority, meaning that he will be required to pay for his own care until such time his savings drop below £23,250. At that point the local authority will conduct a financial assessment and that’s when ‘deprivation of assets’ may be considered if they feel that your dad’s savings have been spent ‘unreasonably’ in order to avoid paying for his care. It tends to vary from local authority to local authority with regards to what constitutes ‘unreasonable’. With regards to transfer of the care package, the situation tends to vary but it’s possible that the local authority could arrange for the transfer of the care package, with your dad funding it himself, but it will become more problematical if he is moving to a different local authority area. It may be a case of you needing to arrange a new care package if he moves in with you.

A separate issue relating to finances is that if you hold financial power of attorney for your dad then you are required to act in his best interests, and not benefit financially from your role. If you are attorney, then you will need to discuss the situation with the OPG as they may consider that paying for a loft conversion on your property using your dad's money is likely to benefit you financially (in terms of adding value to your property). It's all a bit of a minefield and as per the comments above, you will need to think carefully before making any decisions regarding moving your dad in with you. He may need a care home sooner than you think so spending his money now on a loft conversion that may not be used by him for long, will use up savings that he will to spend on his care home fees.

You may find this factsheet about paying for care (at home or in a care home) helpful as it covers the financial assessment process and the upper & lower savings thresholds.


 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
14,385
0
South coast
Even if there is no problem with a care package, he settles in and spending his money on your house is not considered to be deprivation of assets, Im a bit worried that you are doing a loft conversion. Are you expecting him to live up there? Stairs regularly become a huge problem for people with dementia as their mobility decreases and they are no longer safe on stairs, or even a stair lift. Quite often you have to move them, bed etc, totally downstairs. Unless you have separate rooms (including a bathroom) downstairs that he could use in entirety this will be incredibly disruptive to the whole family.

I really do think you would be better off looking for a care home.
 

Nicola78

New member
May 9, 2020
8
0
Thank you all for your input. Absolute minefield. I think I know that in my heart he should stay in his own home until he can no longer. My dad's care package is adequate and I am happy to sell his house when it comes time for more supervision within a care home setting. I will probably be spending every night with him until that point.

I am unable to post anymore replies not sure why but here's an addition and thank you all once again.
Louise 7, Thanks for all this information and the attachment. My dad is part funded by the local authority. I hadn't realised that once his house was sold that it fell into the 'self funder' category. I would only act in his best interests and I think my brother was thinking more of keeping dad out of a care home than me profiting as such. Rather he thought the money would be better with me than lining the pockets of the care home. But as you mention I would need to discuss that with the OPG.



Canary, No he wouldn't be in the loft. I have a downstairs toilet and I would make the lounge his bedroom. Directly opposite lounge. However, given all the information, I would consider him better in his own home until more supervision is required eg a care home.
 
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Nicola78

New member
May 9, 2020
8
0
Hi @Nicola78 ,my mother in law had a private care package in her own home for 3 years. My husband would not have considered having her with us, because she simply would have refused to stay in any extension. She wanted to be with us all the time, ringing us at all hours. We couldn't have tolerated her in the same house because she was aggressive if we visited her in her own home, when we needed to go away. Unless you have someone with your father 24 /7 you may find the situation intolerable even with carers visits. It gets to the point where constant supervision is required, usually a care home setting
The phone calls resonate with me, my dad would phone me constantly. It drove me insane, fortunately he forgot he had a phone, so I took it away. I agree about being with him 24 hours, I know it would be too much.
Thank you.