Care of Aunt - no POA

Discussion in 'I care for a person with dementia' started by Cath59, Apr 19, 2017.

  1. Cath59

    Cath59 Registered User

    Jan 23, 2015
    46
    I haven't visited this forum for some time, but remember wonderful support when my mother was ill - so I'm just hoping someone out there may have some ideas or advice for me.
    I have an 89 year old aunt, who has been living alone, but has recently suffered a mild stroke. She is now very confused, but has been transferred to a rehab ward close to her home. She has no children, but four nieces - myself and three cousins. As the last of our mothers' family, she matters a lot to all of us, but none of us live particularly close. One of my cousins is "only" a couple of hours drive, and has been pretty amazing in keeping an eye on her - but is in no position to put in more time than she already does.
    I'm kicking myself for not having pushed harder for her to sign POAs, but she was always a very private person when it came to finances, and we are where we are. It's no longer appropriate.
    Now the question I'm hoping someone may have some thoughts on - the hospital tells us that they are planning to discharge her to her home. Not immediately, but in the not too distant future. I know about applying to the Court of Protection to be a legal deputy, but I also know from experience that it's a lengthy process - and couldn't be completed quickly enough to be useful here.
    We would all be delighted if she is well enough to return home safely (it would be the best outcome), but are all pretty sceptical that it will really be appropriate for her to be there with a package of a maximum of four short carer visits a day. Unless she shows improvement, and without family close by, it is likely that she would be better in a care home.
    In answer to the obvious question about what she wants herself, her general answer to any question is "I don't know".
    She has a reasonable pension (retired teacher), and I would imagine savings, but obviously without POA we can't access those, and I'm pretty sure that she couldn't deal with it herself. I'm sure the local authority would consider her self funding.
    So, IF we're really concerned that she shouldn't be sent home, is there anything we can do?
    I'm still hoping she may improve before discharge, but at the moment, everyone seems to think her mental function is getting worse rather than better.
    I should probably add that after experiences with my mother and severely disabled brother I have a deep distrust of hospital discharge teams - but that's another story!
     

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